The Honors Experience

two nc a&T students studying outside

The foundation of the Honors Experience is captured by values and beliefs that guide our community of learners. The Honors Program curriculum, co-curricular engagement, and communities are designed for students to put into practice each experience and provide the guidance and resources for students to develop within the curriculum pathway that matches their academic, personal and career interests.

 

female student smiles at the cameraStudent Organizations

Honors Student Advisory Board: The Honors Student Advisory Board (HSAB) is the active student voice of the University Honors Program. The purpose of the Advisory Board is to enhance the educational experience of every member of the honors student body by providing engaging programming and promoting academic, social and cultural growth. Honors Student Advisory Board members have the opportunity to influence the direction of the Honors Program, while experiencing self-enrichment through planning events, sharing ideas and serving the community.

Honors Learning Assistants: Formerly known as the Aggie Mentoring Program (AMP) was implemented in 2008, and revamped to the Honors Learning Assistants in 2018 to allow participants to serve as tutors and mentors while helping them learn the skills and habits essential for both academic and professional success. Applications are generally available at the start of each fall semester and available to students in all major disciplines.

students discussing medical issues

Honors Society: Honors students are eligible to become members of prestigious national and international honor societies, such as Alpha Lambda Delta (ALD). Students must be enrolled full time, have a minimum 3.5 grade point average and be in the top 20% of their class during their first term or first year of study. Members in such societies often have access to additional scholarship resources, a national network of peers, and leadership opportunities in their local chapters.

Honor Ambassadors: The Honors Ambassadors are a fundamental component of the first-year Honors student experience and aims to foster a sense of community within the program to navigate both social and academic aspects of college life. They serve as both student recruiters and mentors throughout the academic year. As a student recruiter they provide student perspectives at our annual Honors Friday Sessions, University Open House, and other campus events. The mentoring experience begins at the Honors Program Orientation, which takes place the week prior to classes beginning each Fall. Mentors’ main roles are to meet with students and answer any questions new students may have by providing a wealth of information, resources, and support.

DISCIPLINARY HONORS RESEARCH HONORS INTERNATIONAL HONORS
  • Complete 18 credit hours of honors coursework
  • Complete 6 credits of Career Focused Experience:
    • Internship/Co-op
    • Leadership Development
  • Complete 15 credit hours of honors coursework
  • Complete 9 credits of Research Experience:
    • Faculty Mentored
    • Summer Research
    • Research Thesis
    • Service Learning
  • Complete 12 credit hours of honors coursework
  • Complete 12 credits of Global Experience:
    • Study/Travel Abroad
    • Mastery of a Foreign language
    • International Internship

 

  • New members must enroll in at least 6 credit hours of honors coursework within their first year.
  • Entering first-years should also enroll in an Honors First-Year Seminar Course (FRST 101 Honors) unless credit has already been received or major curriculum has a designated Student Success
  • All members should complete at least 12 credit hours of honors coursework within their first 4 semesters.
  • Honors contract can count toward honors course credit. No more than two course contracts can be submitted per semester.
  • Experiential learning, or learning-by-doing, is the personal achievement of knowledge and skill through practice; practices can range from those closely connected to one’s career plans, as with research or internships, to those that shape one’s perspective profoundly but may not be closely connected to professional aspirations, as is often the case with study abroad. Students select those experiential learning opportunities that they expect will cultivate the knowledge and skills that interest them; a reflection process facilitates students' ability to understand and articulate how these experiences will integrate with formal academic learning towards their broader self-conceptions and goals.

Staying in the Program

Members of the University Honors Program are required to maintain a minimum 3.50 cumulative GPA each semester. If a student falls below the required 3.50 cumulative GPA, they will have a one semester probationary period to get back in good standings. If a student falls below a 3.50 for two consecutive semesters, they will be suspended and relinquish all privileges from the program. Students may seek re-admittance once the cumulative 3.50 cumulative GPA is again established and should be prepared to demonstrate readiness to meet and maintain curricular and co-curricular requirements.

Graduating with Honors Distinction

Honors Distinction: Students who are active members of the Honors Program in good standing can be considered for graduation with Honors Distinction. To complete graduation requirements from the Honors Program students are expected to earn 24 hours of honors credit through coursework and experiential learning. All graduating seniors must complete an honors exit survey for consideration of Honors Distinction.

Honors Distinction graduates will receive cords, stoles, or medallions depending on the credits completed. Membership in the program does not guarantee you will graduate with Honors Distinction if requirements have not been met.

University Honors: All students must apply for graduation through Aggie Access Online. University Honors is not associated with the Honors Program and additional information can be reviewed here: Candidate for Graduation.

Each semester, honors students engage in a vigorous calendar of events and activities that promotes learning outside of the classroom through academic enrichment, community service, exposure to the arts, career development, and social networking. The co-curricular experience is an integral part of the honors experience and some are required as part of our graduation distinction criteria.

  • Signature Lecture Series*
  • Cultural Competencies*
  • Service Learning*
  • Signature Travel Abroad
  • Leadership Development
  • Graduate School and Career Preparation
  • Extraordinary Opportunities 

Items above notated with an asterisk (*) require semester participation to earn honors distinction at graduation. Requirement: Two lectures and two cultural competencies per semester; 10 hours of service per semester.

Honors Living Learning Community (LLC): The Honors Programs offers students a chance to step beyond the classroom and utilize the residential community to explore and experience the best that North Carolina A&T State University has to offer. Honors students are housed in a Living Learning Community in Aggie Village (primarily McNeil and Blair Hall). The program takes advantage of classroom space in the residence hall to hold workshops, seminars, and programs designed to expose honors students to leadership development and support their need to do their best work. The goals and objectives for the LLC are based on first-year Honors students who live together in their Honors Living-Learning Community where they collaborate on a variety of activities to collectively explore their interests and needs. They are supported by the Honors LLC Coordinator, Director, Honors Advisor, Honors staff, upper class Honors students and the Honors LLC Activities planning Committee.

Honors Student Advisory Board (HSAB): The Honors Student Advisory Board (HSAB) is the active student voice of the University Honors Program. The purpose of the Advisory Board is to enhance the educational experience of every member of the honors student body by providing engaging programming and promoting academic, social and cultural growth. Honors Student Advisory Board members have the opportunity to influence the direction of the Honors Program, while experiencing self-enrichment through planning events, sharing ideas and serving the community.

Honor Ambassadors: The Honors Ambassadors are a fundamental component of the first-year Honors student experience and aims to foster a sense of community within the program to navigate both social and academic aspects of college life. They serve as both student recruiters and mentors throughout the academic year. As a student recruiter they provide student perspectives at our annual Honors Friday Sessions, University Open House, and other campus events. The mentoring experience begins at the Honors Program Orientation, which takes place the week prior to classes beginning each Fall. Mentors’ main roles are to meet with students and answer any questions new students may have by providing a wealth of information, resources, and support.

Honors Societies: Honor students are eligible to become members of a number of nationally and internationally recognized honor societies. Two that are housed within the University Honors Program are Alpha Lambda Delta (ALD) and Phi Kappa Phi (PKP).

  • Alpha Lambda Delta: Students must be enrolled full time, have a minimum 3.5 grade point average and be in the top 20% of their class during their first term or first year of study. Members in such societies often have access to additional scholarship resources, a national network of peers, and leadership opportunities in their local chapters. Invitations are sent to students to join during the early Spring semester.
  • Phi Kappa Phi: Membership in The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi is earned by invitation only. Juniors must have completed at least 72 credit hours, with at least 24 semester hours at their current institution, and rank in the top 7.5 percent of their class. Seniors must have completed at least 90 credit hours, with at least 24 semester hours at their current institution, and rank in the top 10 percent of their class.