Inaugural February One Scholars

The February One scholarship program is named for the day in 1960 when North Carolina A&T freshmen Ezell Blair Jr. (Jibreel Khazan), Franklin McCain, Joseph McNeil and David Richmond energized a national sit-in movement by refusing to leave a segregated lunch counter in downtown Greensboro without being served. The A&T Four are celebrated annually at the university’s Feb. 1 celebration and honored in numerous ways across the university.

The scholarship is a fully funded four-year award that covers the costs of tuition, related fees, housing, meals, and participation in University Honors Program activities and enrichment annually for five freshman each from the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, the College of Education and the John R. and Kathy R. Hairston College of Health and Human Sciences. The three colleges partnered to establish the program using a portion of philanthropist MacKenzie Scott’s historic $45 million contribution to the university.

This year’s scholars are listed below in alphabetical order:

  • Zoe Brooks, daughter of Dionne Palmer and Lamont Brooks, is from Chesapeake, Virginia, and a graduate of Oscar F. Smith High School. She is studying elementary education with a minor in sociology. Her career goal is to be a “wonderful teacher and role model” and obtain a master’s degree in education. 
  • Levi Burks, daughter of Paul Burks and Constance Burks, is from Westerville, Ohio, and a graduate of Westerville Central High School. She is studying liberal studies (pre-law concentration) with a minor in English. She plans to earn a Juris Doctor and pursue a career in civil rights law.
  • Kalia Coleman, daughter of Kevin Coleman and Durriyah Coleman, is from Dumfries, Virginia, and a graduate of Potomac Senior High School. She is studying nursing. She intends to become a travel nurse and give back to her community.
  • Laila Garland, daughter of LaTricia Garland and Dr. Jeffery Garland, is from East Orange, New Jersey, and a graduate of Donald M. Payne Sr. School of Technology. She is studying elementary education. She plans to use her knowledge and skills to enhance the minds and self-confidence of the next generation of students.
  • Kaylee Harper, daughter of Elizabeth Harper and Duane Harper, is from Raleigh, North Carolina, and a graduate of Rolesville High School. She is studying psychology. She intends to become a psychologist so she can help fight the stigma of mental health care in the Black community.
  • Adam Henry, son of Alfred Henry Jr. and Jamie V. Henry, is from Atlanta and a graduate of Westlake High School. He is studying psychology with a minor in speech. His goal is to obtain his master’s and doctorate degrees and become a clinical psychologist to open several psychological centers and serve the growing needs to diagnose and support patients with mental health conditions.
  • Camille Jones, daughter of Lynette Jones and Daryl Jones, is from Washington, D.C., and a graduate of Capital City Public Charter School. She is studying criminal justice. She intends to become a criminal justice attorney and help end the prison sentence gap between white people and Black and brown people, as well as reform the justice system to be fair to the members of these communities.
  • Ayana Lee, daughter of Kemba Dennis and Kristopher Lee, is from Laurinburg, North Carolina, and a graduate of Scotland High School. She is studying nursing. She plans to become a nurse practitioner advocate for Black women in health care.
  • Kyla Morrison, daughter of Melette Morrison and Jerry Morrison, is from Charlotte, North Carolina, and a graduate of Merancas Middle College High School. She is studying elementary education with a minor in psychology. She wants to use her teaching degree to make a difference in underserved communities and schools around the country.
  • Amira Poindexter, daughter of Eboni Poindexter and William Poindexter, is from Charlotte and a graduate of Hickory Ridge High School. She is studying criminal justice with a minor in psychology. She intends to pursue a career as a criminal psychologist or behavioral analyst.
  • Lauren Raven, daughter of Pamela Raven and Shannon Raven, is from Sugar Land, Texas, and a graduate of William B. Travis High School. She is studying elementary education with a minor in child development and family studies. She plans to kick-start her career back in Texas and foster and inclusive classroom environment where she can connect and bridge relationships with each of her students.
  • Jayla Richardson, daughter of Felicia Richardson and James Richardson, is from Rocky Mount, North Carolina, and a graduate of Northern Nash High School. She is studying criminal justice with a minor in psychology. She wants to become a defense attorney and provide representation to falsely accused minorities.
  • Jayden Seay, son of Stacy Seay and John Seay, is from Woodbridge, Virginia, and a graduate of C.D. Hylton High School. He is studying elementary education with a minor in African American/African history. His career goal is to become an elementary school teacher so that Black boys can have teacher who look like them, because he hopes to be able to pour into the coming generations and be a bright light and positive influence for them.
  • Destiny Sellers, daughter of Alma Lawton and Clarence Sellers Sr., is from Elloree, South Carolina, and a graduate of Lake Marion High School. She is studying liberal studies (pre-law) with a minor in criminal justice and is participating in the Air Force ROTC. She wants to commission into the Air Force as a second lieutenant and begin preparing to become a Judge Advocate General, then serve for 20 years, retire, and start her own law firm dedicated to civil rights cases and others.
  • Ameileon Williams, daughter of Natalia Stevenson and Steven Williams, is from Supply, North Carolina, and a graduate of Brunswick County Early College High School. She is studying nursing. She plans to become a nurse-midwife and be an agent of change within the labor and delivery field by conducting and utilizing research on the errors commonly made during and after birth that contribute to the mortality rate of minority women globally.

 

Zoe Brooks Ali
Zoe Brooks
Levi Burks
Levi Burks
Kalia Coleman
Kalia Coleman
Lalia Garland
Laila Garland

Kaylee Harper
Kaylee Harper

Adam Henry
Adam Henry

Camille Jones
Camille Jones

Ayana Lee
Ayana Lee

Kyla Morrison
Kyla Morrison

Amria Poindexter
Amira Poindexter

Lauren Raven
Lauren Raven

Jayla Richardson
Jayla Richardson

Jayden Seay
Jayden Seay

Destiny Sellers
Destiny Sellers

Ameileon Williams
Ameileon Williams