Seminar Presentation

Curriculum Guide

The mission of the Applied Science & Technology PhD program is to prepare students for high-level science and technology careers in industry, research, and government. Graduates will be able to conceive, develop, and conduct original research that applies physical, mathematical, and technological methods to provide solutions to a broad range of emerging local, national, and global problems related to physical and life sciences, energy and environment, and technology.

Additional Admission Requirements

  • B.S. degree in a science, math, technology, engineering or related discipline with a GPA≥3.5/4.0 or a master’s degree in a science, math, technology, engineering or related discipline with a GPA≥3.25/4.0 from a college or university recognized by a regional or general accrediting agency
  • GRE or GMAT verbal and quantitative scores

 

Program Outcomes:

  • Communication Skills – (1) Students completing the Applied Science & Technology PhD program will exhibit effective oral communication skills in terms of customizing presentations to the audience, displaying information, and delivering the presentations. (2) Students completing the Applied Science & Technology PhD program will exhibit effective written communication skills in terms of content/ideas, organization, word choice, and grammar.
  • Critical Thinking Skills - Students completing the Applied Science & Technology PhD program will effectively use quantitative and qualitative analytical problem ­ solving skills in terms of defining hypotheses/research questions, reviewing research literature, developing a research plan, identifying the broader impacts of research, and developing a research timetable.
  • Disciplinary Expertise - Students completing the Applied Science & Technology PhD program will demonstrate discipline ­ specific expertise in terms of the scientific method, applying technical knowledge to answer research questions, experimental plans and data analysis, analytical methods, and research ethics.
  • Research/Creative Engagement - Students completing the Applied Science & Technology PhD program will demonstrate ability to engage productively in the review and conduct of disciplinary research in terms of making conference presentations and publishing refereed journal publications.

 Degree Requirements

Total credit hours: 66 (post baccalaureate)

  • Core courses (9 credits): AST 830, 831, MATH 721
  • Seminar (6 credits): Take AST 992 six times in six semesters
  • Dissertation (AST 997: 15 credits)
  • Pass qualifying exam, preliminary exam, and dissertation defense
  • In consultation with advisor, take 18 credit hours within one of the following concentrations:
    • Atmospheric, Environmental and Energy Science
    • Applied Physics
    • Bioscience
    • Applied Chemistry
    • Data Science and Analytics
    • Information Technology and Technology Management
  • In consultation with advisor, take 18 credit hours of additional courses relevant to research area

 Dissertation Research:

A student may not register for dissertation credits before passing Qualifying Examination. No more than 15 dissertation credits are counted toward the total credit hours requirement for the degree.

 Qualifying Examination:

The Qualifying Examination is given to assess the student’s competence in a broad range of relevant subject areas. Only students with unconditional status and in good academic standing may take the Qualifying Examination. A student who wants to retake the Qualifying Examination must apply to retake the Qualifying Examination by the posted deadline. No student is permitted to take the Qualifying Examination more than twice. A student not recommended for re-examination or who fails the exam on a second attempt may be dismissed from the doctoral program.

 Preliminary Oral Examination:

The Preliminary Oral Examination is conducted by the student's dissertation committee and is a defense of the student’s dissertation proposal. Passing this exam satisfies requirements for Ph.D. Candidacy. Failure on the examination may result in dismissal from the doctoral program. The student's Advisory Committee may permit one re-examination. At least one full semester must elapse before the re-examination. Failure on the second attempt will result in dismissal from the doctoral program.

 Admission to Candidacy

Student will be admitted to candidacy upon successful completion of the Qualifying Exam and the Preliminary oral Exam.

 Final Oral Examination:

The Final Oral Examination is conducted by the student's dissertation committee. This examination is the final dissertation defense presentation that is scheduled after a dissertation is completed. The examination may be held no earlier than one semester (or four months) after admission to candidacy. Failure on the examination may result in dismissal from the doctoral program. The student's Advisory Committee may permit one re-examination. At least one full semester must elapse before the re-examination. Failure on the second attempt will result in dismissal from the doctoral program.

 Submission of Dissertation:

Upon passing the Ph.D. Final Oral Examination, the Ph.D. student must have the dissertation approved by each member of the student's dissertation committee. The approved dissertation must be submitted to The Graduate College by the deadline given in the academic calendar, and must conform to the Graduate College’s guidelines for theses and dissertations.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

AST 800               Introduction to Research Ethics

AST 812               Environmental Chemistry

AST 814                Life Cycle Analysis

AST 821                Energy & Environmental Economics I         

AST 822                Energy & Environmental Economics II

AST 820                Sustainable Energy Systems

AST 830                Foundations of Scientific Research

AST 831                Math & Computational Modeling

AST 841                Biomaterials Characterization  

AST 842                Biomass Thermal Conversion Processes  

AST 843                Biomass Biological Conversion Processes  

AST 844                Environmental and Policy Studies of Biomass Use  

AST 850                Physical Meteorology

AST 851                Dynamic Meteorology  

AST 852                Climatology

AST 853                Numerical Weather Prediction  

AST 854                Advanced Weather Analysis  

AST 855                Principles of Air Quality 

AST 856                Atmospheric Aerosols

AST 857                Advanced Remote Sensing

AST 858                Tropical Meteorology

AST 859                 Advanced Mesoscale Analysis

AST 885                Doctoral Special Topics

 

 Ph.D. Level Pass/Fail Courses

AST 984                Laboratory Internship

AST 985                Doctoral Supervised Practicum

AST 992                Doctoral Seminar

AST 993                Doctoral Supervised Teaching

AST 994                Doctoral Supervised Research

AST 997                Doctoral Dissertation

AST 999                Continuation of Doctoral Degree


AST 800.   Introduction to Research Ethics                                       Credit 1(1-0)

This course will cover the policies regulating research at land grant universities and the ethical principles on which these policies are based.  Topics covered include use of humans in research; use of animals in research; research misconduct; authorship and peer review; intellectual property; proper experimental design, data collection, and statistical interpretation; and discipline-specific issues. Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

AST 812.       Environmental Chemistry                                               Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the chemical aspects of applied environmental science. Topics covered include the sources, reactions, transport, and fates of chemical species in water, soil, and air along with the analytical techniques used to study the chemicals.  Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 813.       Sustainable Energy Systems                                          Credit 3(3-0)

The course will cover the thermodynamic, mass and energy balance, economic, and environmental considerations of sustainable energy systems.  Alternative energy technologies and conventional energy technologies will be compared.  Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 814.       Life Cycle Analysis                                                              Credit 3(2-2)

The course introduces the life cycle assessment (LCA) process with the aid of an LCA software package. Topics covered include life cycle goal and scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment, and reporting and interpretation.  Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 821.       Environmental & Energy Economics I                          Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents theories of natural resource utilization and allocation. Topics covered include externalities, public goods, environmental quality, planning natural resource use and environmental quality, evolution of energy industries, and current energy and environmental regulatory systems. Prerequisites:  Doctoral Standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 822.       Environmental & Energy Economics II                          Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents interrelationships of natural resource use and the environment. Topics covered include applied welfare and benefit-cost analysis, externalities and pollution abatement, and quantitative methodologies for analyzing energy, natural resource, and environmental problems. Prerequisites: EES 711.

 

EES 830.    Foundations of Scientific Research                                    Credit 3(3-0)

This course provides students the foundation needed to successfully design and communicate their dissertation research. Students will improve their ability to perform a literature search, read and understand scientific journal articles, develop clear hypotheses about issues for which there is no answer in the literature, design experiments to test hypotheses, and present them clearly in writing and orally.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 831     Math & Computational Modeling                                   Credit 3(3-0)

This course explores how to mathematically model a system, select an appropriate numerical method, implement computer simulations, and assess the ensuing results. Topics include nonlinear, 2D, and 3D models; nonrectangular domains; systems of partial differential equations; and large algebraic problems requiring high-performance computing.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and consent of instructor.

 AST 841.    Biomaterials Characterization                                           Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the analytical and spectroscopic techniques and tools available for examining molecular and macroscopic structural features of naturally occurring materials with emphasis on the lignocellulosic substrate.  Topics covered will provide an appreciation for the fundamental principles behind the available techniques.  Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 842.    Biomass Thermal Conversion Processes                           Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the available chemical and thermal methods and processes that are available to convert biomass into commodity chemicals and energy as part of a biorefinery concept. Topics covered include the conversion of biomass to specific end products or to complex mixtures of materials such as syngas and pyrolysis oils.  Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 843.    Biomass Biological Conversion Processes                         Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the available biological conversion methods and processes that are available to convert biomass into commodity chemicals and energy as part of a biorefinery concept.  Topics covered will highlight the challenges of bioconversions in terms of cost, dewatering, and limited thermal and pH ranges.  Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 844.    Environmental and Policy Studies of Biomass Use             Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the ways in which biomass technological principles impinge upon policy issues.  Topics covered include lifecycle analysis, management issues, public policy development, and principles of green engineering and sustainability.   Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 850.    Physical Meteorology                                                                  Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents physical principles related to atmospheric environmental systems, processes, and measurements. Topics covered include atmospheric thermodynamics, atmospheric radiation transfer, and cloud microphysical processes.  Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 851.    Dynamic Meteorology                                                                 Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents classical and physical hydrodynamics.  Topics covered include perturbation theory, scale analysis of dynamic equations, atmospheric boundary layers, atmospheric wave motions, the general circulation model, dynamics of tropical convections, middle atmosphere dynamics, atmospheric instabilities, and numerical weather forecasting.  Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 852.    Climatology                                                                                    Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents physical and chemical principles that influence climate. Topics covered include earth climate history and present-day climate, climate equilibrium, earth energy budget, climate in middle and high latitudes, climate change detection, and future climate scenarios.   Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 853.    Numerical Weather Prediction                                                  Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the physical and mathematical basis for numerical weather prediction with computer experiments to demonstrate principles and techniques. Topics covered include derivation of sets of prediction equations consistent with scale analysis and dynamical constraints, atmospheric waves and filtered equations, numerical methods and computational instabilities, filtered and primitive equation models, and National Weather Service operational models.  Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 854.    Advanced Synoptic Weather Analysis                                    Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents advanced analysis of synoptic weather systems, such as extratropical cyclones and their associated fronts and jet streams. Topics covered include the quasigeostrophic theory, isentropic analysis, potential vorticity dynamics, baoclinic instability, fronts and frontogenesis, and cyclones and cyclogenesis.  Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 855.    Principles of Air Quality                                                             Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the chemical interactions, transport, and monitoring of trace gas, aerosol, and particulate pollutants in the atmosphere. Topics covered include geochemical cycles, biogeochemical cycles, climate effects, health effects, regulations, and air quality meteorology.   Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 856.    Atmospheric Aerosols                                                               Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the physics and chemistry of particles and droplets in the atmosphere. Topics covered include optical properties and particle absorption and scattering, solutions of radiative transfer equation in multiple scattering atmospheres, statistics of size distributions, and physical chemistry of atmospheric aerosols.   Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 857.    Advanced Remote Sensing                                                       Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents principles of remote sensing with emphasis on atmospheric science applications. Topics covered include satellite and radar remote sensing, principles of atmospheric radiative transfer, descriptions of important satellite platforms, orbits and sensors, the retrieval of atmospheric variables from active and passive systems, and basic principles of interpretation.   Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 858.    Tropical Meteorology                                                                  Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents the dynamics of circulations, convection, and wave activity in the tropics. Topics covered include various theories of tropical cyclone formations, large scale circulation systems of the tropical atmosphere, El Niňo Southern Oscillations, and wave disturbances in the tropics such as African easterly waves, Rosby waves, Kelvin waves, and waves in the intraseasonal range.   Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 859.    Advanced Mesoscale Analysis                                                   Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents mesoscale atmospheric phenomena and processes attributed to instabilities, topographic forcing, and/or air mass boundaries. Topics covered include mesoscale instabilities, boundary layer convection, mesoscale convective systems, and orographic mesoscale flows.   Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 885.       Doctoral Special Topics                                                             Credit 3(2-4)

This course allows the introduction of new topics on a trial basis at the doctoral level.  The topic of the course will be determined prior to registration.  Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 984.    Laboratory Internship                                                                  Credit 3(0-6)

This course allows a student to explore various research areas first-hand by performing multiple projects in different laboratories under the mentorship of members of the graduate faculty.  It should be taken before a student passes the qualifying exam.  Grading is satisfactory/unsatisfactory evaluation only.   Prerequisites:  Doctoral standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 985.       Doctoral Supervised Practicum                                               Credit 3(0-6)

This course represents the supervised internship for the doctoral student that satisfies the 3 credits of required professional development.  Oral and written presentations on the experience will be provided to the faculty.  Grading is satisfactory/unsatisfactory evaluation only.  Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and consent of instructor.

 

AST 992.       Doctoral Seminar                                                                        Credit 1(1-6)

This course includes presentations delivered by the doctoral students, faculty, and invited speakers on topics related to energy and environmental issues and research.  Grading is satisfactory/unsatisfactory evaluation only. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing.

 

AST 993.       Doctoral Supervised Teaching                                                Credit 3(2-2)

This course represents the supervised teaching for the doctoral student that satisfies required professional development.  This course introduces the doctoral student to classroom or laboratory teaching under the supervision of a faculty mentor.  Doctoral students who serve as teaching assistants or as instructors are required to take this course during the first semester they teach.  Grading is satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing.

 

AST 994.       Doctoral Supervised Research                                               Variable Credit 3(3-9)

This course is supervised research under the mentorship of a member of the graduate faculty before a student passes the preliminary exam.  This research should lead to the identification of a dissertation topic and written research proposal. Grading is satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing.

 

AST 997.       Doctoral Dissertation                                                                Variable Credit 1(1-15)

This course represents the supervised research leading to the dissertation for the doctoral student.  Doctoral dissertation research will be conducted under the supervision of the dissertation committee chairperson and include regular meetings with the dissertation committee to evaluate progress on the dissertation.  Grading is satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing.

 

AST 999.       Continuation/Residency                                                           Credit 1(1-3)

Meets requirement for continuous enrollment during final term prior to graduation when all course credit requirements (including dissertation) have been completed. This course is non-graded, may receive a grade of S/U, and credit for this course does not count toward the degree. May be repeated twice. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing.