Researchers in the NSF Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials

Major research projects

North Carolina A&Teach STEM Scholars Program

This $1.2 million award to the NC A&T School of Education, sponsored by the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, recruits high-achieving undergraduate STEM majors at A&T and helps them earn North Carolina teacher certification along with their baccalaureate STEM degrees.  The goal is a sustainable pipeline of new middle and high school teachers in mathematics and the sciences.  The Departments of Curriculum and Instruction, Chemistry, Physics, and Biology are involved in this project.

Project PAPERS

Preparing Adapted Physical Educators to Render Services (PAPERS), a $1.2 million award from the U.S. Department of Education, will enable NC A&T’s School of Education to prepare 40 people over four years to become highly-qualified, master’s level teachers.  These professionals will be equipped to deliver adapted physical education to all students in the least restrictive environment in a variety of school settings. Scholars in the program will meet the criteria of the Adapted Physical Activities Council.


NC A&T’s College of Engineering was awarded $5 million by the Department of Defense’s Air Force Research Laboratory for a Testing, Evaluation, and Control of Autonomous Vehicles (TECHLAV) Center.  In addition to testing and evaluation, the Center will commercialize autonomous vehicle technology for the benefit of the civilian economy as well as national defense.

Project CREED

NC A&T’s School of Education was awarded $1.2 million to recruit 20 well-qualified scholars from underrepresented groups, including persons with disabilities, and to train them to integrate intensive intervention and culturally-responsive practices into their work in urban classrooms and diverse communities. Professional development of teachers as well as evaluation and dissemination of best practices to the education community are additional goals of the project: Culturally Responsive Educators for Diversity (CREED).


The Cooperative Extension Program at N.C. A&T received a $1.3 million award from North Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services (via funding originally from the US Department of Agriculture) to teach participants, including preschoolers, K-12 children, and adults, empowering behaviors related to nutrition and exercise.  Providing knowledge and skills to make healthy lifestyle choices in this outreach effort will benefit both individuals and their communities by lowering rates of obesity and chronic disease, as well as improving quality of life.