Department of Chemistry

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/cas/chemistry/index.html

Zerihun Assefa, Chairperson

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the Department of Chemistry are as follows:

  1. to prepare chemistry majors for graduate study in chemistry or other chemistry-based sciences;
  2. to prepare majors for admittance to medical, dental, and other professional schools;
  3. to prepare majors for careers as professional chemists;
  4. to prepare majors to teach chemistry at the secondary school level;
  5. to provide majors in other departments with a functional understanding of chemistry commensurate with the needs of their chosen fields;
  6. to provide all students served by the department with an insight into the nature of scientific investigations and the scientific enterprise in general;
  7. to offer for graduate students learning experiences and research leading to a M.S. Degree in chemistry;
  8. to offer learning experiences and research leading to a M.S. Degree in education with a concentration in chemistry;
  9. to share the resources (human and physical) of the department with the local and academic community through cooperative programs, workshops, seminars, course offerings, etc.; and
  10. to contribute to the extension of basic knowledge in chemistry and related sciences through applied and basic research, educational experimentation, publications, etc.

DEGREES OFFERED

Chemistry – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Chemistry (Secondary Education) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Chemistry (Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s-ABM) – Bachelor of Science/Master of Science (Curriculum Guide)

GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

For Fall 2017, the admission of students to the undergraduate degree program in the Department of Chemistry are based upon the general admission requirements of the University. For students entering Fall 2016 and thereafter, to be admitted into the undergraduate degree programs of the Department of Chemistry incoming freshmen must meet all of the following requirements:

  • English: Four course units emphasizing grammar, composition, and literature
  • Foreign Language: Two course units in the same language
  • Mathematics: Four course units including Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and a higher level mathematics course for which Algebra II is a prerequisite
  • Science: Three course units including at least one unit in a physical science,  life or biological science, and at least one laboratory course
  • A minimum SAT (math plus reading comprehension) combined score of 850 or an ACT composite score of 17
  • A minimum high school grade point average of 2.8 (unweighted)
  • Transfer students from other colleges and universities and from other disciplines at A&T must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher in all college work.

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Chemistry Major – The professional major in chemistry must complete 120 semester hours of University courses. The student may select one of two options in order to complete the professional major. The options are the American Chemical Society (ACS) Certified Program or the Biochemistry and Biomedical Science Program. The ACS program requires the student to complete 57 semester hours in basic chemistry courses and nine to twelve hours in advanced chemistry courses of which three hours must be the capstone course CHEM 497. The Biochemistry and Biomedical Science Program requires the student to complete 52 semester hours in basic chemistry courses, nine to twelve  hours in advanced chemistry courses and 8 semester hours of biology courses. A minimum grade of “C” must be achieved in all chemistry courses. The capstone course must be CHEM 497.

Chemistry Education – The education major must complete 120 semester hours of University courses to complete the Secondary Education with a Concentration in Chemistry degree. Students must pass PRAXIS I. A minimum grade of “C” must be achieved in all basic chemistry courses. The Secondary Education Program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and approved by the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction.

Bachelor of Science/Master of Science in Chemistry – The curricula are identical in the first two years to the professional major’s program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. It is designed to enable talented undergraduate students to obtain the B.S. and M.S. degrees, in chemistry during a five year period of study and research. Any rising junior in chemistry with a grade point average of 3.25 in chemistry and 2.7 overall average is eligible. Required chemistry courses beyond the B.S. level are: CHEM 611, 701, 702, 722, 732, 743 or 749, 799, and 5 hours from among 600 and 700 level chemistry courses.

ACCREDITATION

The professional curriculum (ACS Certified Program) is approved by the American Chemical Society. All Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and approved by the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

B.S. level graduates in chemistry qualify for employment in many fields. There are many career opportunities for chemists in education, government, and industry.

In industry, the chemistry graduate with a B.S. degree may be employed in manufacturing-plant management, research and development, product development, technical sales, marketing, etc. B.S. level chemists work in research at federal, state, municipal, and university laboratories.

The B.S. degree program prepares students to pursue graduate study in chemistry or other chemistry-based sciences (biochemistry, pharmacology, physiology, chemical physics, material science, etc.), medicine, dentistry, and other health professional areas.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN CHEMISTRY

CHEM 100. Physical Science* Credit 3(3-0)
This is a one semester introductory course designed to make clear the nature of science as an enterprise and illustrate by numerous examples how science really proceeds. Learning experiences are constructed so that they closely approximate real life situations where one has to search for clues and insights from a variety of sources. This course is not open to students who have received credit for CHEM 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, or 107. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 103. Foundation of Chemistry Credit 3(3-0)
This is a course introducing the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry. Topics include matter, structure of the atom, nomenclature, chemical equations, bonding and reactions. Mathematical topics include measurements, scientific notation, basic algebraic calculations and stoichiometry. This course aims to improve the student’s problem solving skills. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 104. General Chemistry IV* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to fundamental techniques and concepts in chemistry, including writing and interpretation of symbols, formulas, equations, atomic structure, composition and reactions of inorganic compounds. This course is not open to majors in chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics and engineering. Corequisite: CHEM 114. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 106. General Chemistry VI* Credit 3(3-0)
This is a course which emphasizes basic principles and important theoretical concepts of chemistry. Topics will include atomic structure, electronic configuration, the wave mechanical model of the atom, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibria, systems of acids and bases, and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: SAT MATH score of 490 or SAT Subject MATH Level II score of 470 or ACT MATH score of 19 or completion of CHEM 103 with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: CHEM 116. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 107. General Chemistry VII* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of CHEM 106. It includes the principles of chemical thermodynamics related to physical properties of liquids and solids and spontaneity of reactions; principles of kinetics; principles of chemical equilibrium and its applications in acids – bases, coordination chemistry and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 106 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 117/CHEM 109 (CHEM 190 restricted only to CHEM majors). (F;S;SS)

CHEM 108. Chemistry Orientation Credit 1(1-0)
This course is a series of lectures and discussions on the nature and requirements of the chemical profession the application of chemistry to modern living, and other selected topics. (F)

CHEM 109. Chemistry Freshman Colloquium Credit 1(1-0)
Topics of interest to freshman chemistry majors are presented and discussed. Topics include advising, retention, scholarship, curriculum, summer internships, career planning, and contemporary issues in chemistry. The course also provides a forum for students to interact with CHEM Faculty and the Department Chair. (F,S)

CHEM 110. Physical Science Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This is a laboratory course designed to bring students into working contact with the essential aspects of scientific experiences. In this course the student develops concrete ideas about the operational meaning of the scientific method and problem solving. Corequisite: CHEM 100. This course is not open to students who have received credit for CHEM 114, 115, 116, or 117. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 114. General Chemistry IV Laboratory Credit 1(0-3)
This course is a study of inorganic reaction and substances and their relation to the processes. Corequisite: CHEM 104. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 116. General Chemistry VI Laboratory Credit 1(0-3)
This is a course which emphasizes quantitative studies of chemical reactions such as acid-base studies, redox reactions, and equilibrium reactions. Emphasis is also placed on the development of manipulative skills in the laboratory. Corequisite: CHEM 106. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 117. General Chemistry VII Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3)
This is a continuation of CHEM 116 with an introduction to qualitative analysis. Corequisite: CHEM 107. Prerequisite: CHEM 116. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 190. Introduction to Chemical Research Credit 1(0-3)
This is an introduction to qualitative analysis with emphasis on the basic concepts of research. Students will be introduced to scientific ethics, good laboratory practices, primary literature and on-line search procedures. Corequisite: CHEM 107. Prerequisite 116. (F;S) 

CHEM 208. Chemistry Sophomore Colloquium I Credit 1(1-0)
Topics of interest to first semester sophomore chemistry majors are presented and discussed. Topics include advising, retention, scholarship, curriculum, summer internships, career planning, and contemporary issues in chemistry. The course also provides a forum for students to interact with CHEM Faculty and the Department Chairperson. (F;S)

CHEM 209. Chemistry Sophomore Colloquium II Credit 1(1-0)
Topics of interest to second semester sophomore chemistry majors are presented and discussed. Topics include advising, retention, scholarship, curriculum, summer internships, career planning, and contemporary issues in chemistry. The course also provides a forum for students to interact with CHEM Faculty and the Department Chair. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in CHEM. (F;S)

CHEM 210. Cooperative Experience I Credit 2(2-0)
This course is a supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental chemical facility. The student’s performance will be evaluated by reports from the supervisor of the experience and the departmental staff. The student must present a seminar regarding the experience upon return to the University. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 221. Organic Chemistry I* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the hydrocarbons (aliphatic and aromatic) and introduction to their derivatives. Prerequisite: CHEM 102, 105, or 107. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 222. Organic Chemistry II* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of the study of derivatives of hydrocarbons and more complex compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 221. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 223. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3)
This laboratory course emphasizes the study of physical and chemical properties of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Modern instrumentation such as gas and column chromatography, infrared and ultraviolet analyses are used. Corequisite: CHEM 221. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 224. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory* Credit 2(0-6)
This course is a continuation of Chemistry CHEM. However, more emphasis is placed on syntheses and qualitative analysis of organic compounds. Corequisite: CHEM 222. Prerequisite 223. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 231. Quantitative Analysis I Credit 3(3-0)
Titrimetric and gravimetric analyses including theory and calculations associated with acid-base equilibria, oxidation reduction, nucleation, and precipitation-complexation processes will be covered in this course. Corequisite: MATH 131. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or 107. (S)

CHEM 232. Quantitative Analysis I Laboratory* Credit 2(0-4)
This laboratory course emphasizes the basic principles of chemical separations. Laboratory studies of gravimetric and titrimetric analyses are also encountered. Corequisite: CHEM 231. Prerequisite: CHEM 117. (S)

CHEM 251. Elementary Biochemistry Credit 2(2-0)
This course is a study of fundamental cellular constituents. Emphasis is placed on physiological applications and analyses. Prerequisite: CHEM 105 or 221. Corequisite: CHEM 252. This course is open to nonchemistry majors only. (F)

CHEM 252. Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3)
Elementary biochemical reactions are studied with emphasis placed on applications to biology, home economics and nursing. Prerequisite: CHEM 115 or 223. Corequisite: CHEM 251. (F)

CHEM 290. Methods in Chemical Research I Credit 1(0-3)
This laboratory course provides instruction in experimental techniques of modern organic chemistry emphasizing chemical separations and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds. Stereochemical modeling and the identification of organic unknowns by spectroscopic and chemical methods are also introduced. Prerequisite: CHEM 190 or CHEM 117. (F;S)

CHEM 291. Methods in Chemical Research II Credit 2(0-6)
Students complete research modules that emphasize the use of  various synthetic and analytical skills. An additional goal is the characterization of the physical and chemical properties of the target molecules as well as the intermediates. Students will develop proficiency in synthetic methods, chromatography, and spectroscopy by working with model compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 290 or CHEM 223. (F;S)

CHEM 301. Current Trends in Chemistry Credit 2(2-0)
This course is a series of lectures and discussions on special problems in chemistry and of the chemical profession not covered in formal courses. (F;S)

CHEM 308. Junior Colloquium I Credit 1(1-0)
This course provides students with exposure to current issues in chemistry. (F;S)

CHEM 309. Junior Colloquium II Credit 1(1-0)
This course provides students with exposure to current issues in chemistry. (F;S)

CHEM 310. Cooperative Experience II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental chemical facility. The student’s performance will be evaluated by reports from the supervisor of the experience and the departmental staff. The student must present a seminar regarding the experience upon return to the University. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 390. Methods in Chemical Research III Credit 2(2-0)
This course will guide students through the stages of writing a research proposal. Topics include planning, research and documentation, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, abstracts, budget creation and oral presentation of the proposal. Prerequisite: CHEM 291. (F;S)

CHEM 391. Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry I Credit 2(0-6)
This course will provide directed research involving one-on-one interaction between faculty mentor and student researcher. In consultation with the faculty mentor, the student will devise a research plan and implement aspects of the plan during the semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 390. (F;S)

CHEM 408. Senior Colloquium I Credit 1(1-0)
This course provides students with exposure to current issues in chemistry. (F;S)

CHEM 411. Inorganic Chemistry (formerly CHEM 511) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introductory survey of structure and bonding in inorganic compounds; coordination compounds of the transition metals; donor-acceptor interactions; bonding theories. Prerequisite: CHEM 441. Corequisite: CHEM 442. (S)

CHEM 412. Inorganic Synthesis (formerly CHEM 610) Credit 2(1-3)
A discussion of theoretical principles and survey of classical synthetic techniques of inorganic compounds, applications of instrumental and optical methods of analysis in inorganic synthesis, metal-assisted reaction processes, ligand synthesis, synthesis of coordination compounds, and non-metallic compounds, inorganic frame-work structures of zeolites and silicates will take place in this course. Prerequisite: CHEM 441 and CHEM 411. (S)

CHEM 421. Organic Chemistry III Credit 3(3-0)
This course further develops many of the concepts introduced in Organic Chemistry I & II. Topics to be discussed may include: chemistry of enolates, enamines, dicarbonyl compounds, and amines, molecular orbital theory, conjugated pi systems, UV/vis spectroscopy, polymers, heterocycles, pericyclic reactions, carbohydrates, and lipids. Prerequisite: CHEM 222. (F)

CHEM 431. Quantitative Analysis II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the theory and the operational features of some of the more important instruments that are currently being used as analytical tools such as ultraviolet, visible-light, and infrared spectrophotometers, electro-analytical instruments, thermometric titrators, fluorimeters, etc. Prerequisite: CHEM 441. Corequisite: CHEM 442, 444. (F)

CHEM 432. Instrumental Analysis Lab Credit 2(0-4)
This laboratory course features the utilization of modern instruments such as ultraviolet, visible and infrared, and atomic absorption spectrophotometers, chromatographs (gas-liquid and liquid), electroanalyzer, and electrophoretic analyzer. Corequisite: CHEM 431. (F;S)

CHEM 441. Physical Chemistry I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the fundamental laws governing matter in the gaseous state, and the laws of thermodynamics and their applications to chemistry; it includes an introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: MATH 132, PHYS 241 and CHEM 231. (F;S)

CHEM 442. Physical Chemistry II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of CHEM 441. Solid and liquid states, solutions, phase equilibria, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry will be studied. Prerequisite: CHEM 441. (S)

CHEM 443. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3)
Thermodynamic and kinetic studies are emphasized in this course. Corequisite: CHEM 441. (F;S)

CHEM 444. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory* Credit 1(0-3)
This is a continuation of CHEM 443. Corequisite: CHEM 442. (F)

CHEM 445. Physical Chemistry III (formerly 545) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of quantum chemistry and its application to studies of atomic and molecular structure. Prerequisite: CHEM 442. (S)

CHEM 451. Biochemistry I Credit 3(3-0)
A study of the structures, properties of biological molecules, amino acids, proteins and enzymes, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and membranes. Also the bioenergetics of biological reactions, and enzyme catalysis, with particular emphasis on the underlying chemical principles, including thermodynamics and kinetics will be included. Prerequisite: CHEM 222 and BIOL 100 or BIOL 101. (F;S)

CHEM 452. Biochemistry I Laboratory Credit 2(0-6)
This is a laboratory course that introduces the basic principles, technologies, and instrumentation of current biochemical research. Students will acquire practical experiences, and application skills for the isolation and characterization of biomolecules. The course will encompass spectroscopic, chromatographic, electrophoretic, and recombinant DNA technologies. Error analysis and statistical analysis of experimental data will be included. Prerequisites: CHEM 224 or 252, and BIOL 100 or BIOL 101 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 451. (F;S)

CHEM 453. Biochemistry II  Credit 3(3-0)
A continuation of the material covered in CHEM 451 with an emphasis on metabolic processes. Prerequisite: CHEM 451. (S)

CHEM 490. Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry II Credit 2(0-6)
This course is a continuation of CHEM 390. In consultation with the faculty mentor, the student will further implement aspects of the research plan devised in CHEM 390. Prerequisite: CHEM 391. (F;S)

CHEM 491. Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry III Credit 2(0-6)
This course is a continuation of CHEM 490. Student will continue his/her directed research. Student will be expected to make a presentation at a state, regional, or national meeting. Prerequisite: CHEM 490. (F;S)

CHEM 492. Seminar (formerly CHEM 501) Credit 1(1-0)
In this course the student will choose a research paper from the literature, critically analyze the paper and make an oral presentation with visual aids to the faculty and students. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (F;S)

CHEM 493. Independent Study (formerly CHEM 504) Credit 4(0-10)
This course involves independent study or research in a particular area of chemistry. Students will submit a written report and make an oral presentation with visual aids. Prerequisites: Permission of the department and advanced standing. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 494. Chemical Research (formerly CHEM 503) Credit 4(0-10)
This course makes use of the laboratory and library facilities in studying minor problems of research. Students will submit a written report and make an oral presentation with visual aids. Prerequisites: Advanced standing and permission of the Department. (F;S;SS)

CHEM 497. Chemistry Thesis (formerly CHEM 499) Credit 3(0-6)
In this course the student will write a thesis in consultation with the faculty mentor. The student will give an oral presentation with visual aids and defend the work that has been performed. Prerequisite: CHEM 491 or permission of the instructor. (F;S)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate

CHEM 611. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0)
This is a course in the theoretical approach to the systematization of inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 442. (F)

CHEM 621. Intermediate Organic Chemistry Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an in-depth examination of various organic mechanisms, reactions, structures, and kinetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 222 and CHEM 442. (F)

CHEM 624. Qualitative Organic Chemistry Credit 5(3-6)
This is a course in the systematic identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: One year of Organic Chemistry. (S)

CHEM 631. Electroanalytical Chemistry Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the theory and practice of polarography, chronopotentiomnetry, potential sweep chronoampereometry and electrodeposition. The theory of diffusion and electrode kinetics will also be discussed along with the factors which influence rate processes, the double layer, adsorption and catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 431 or equivalent. (F)

CHEM 641. Instrumentation of the Modern Scientist Credit 3(1-3)
This course is designed to provide students with practical experience and increase their aptitude in 3 specific areas: 1) Knowledge of the background, fundamental theory and practical application of a broad range of instrumentation; 2) oral and written scientific communication and 3) Data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 442 or graduate standing. (F;S)

CHEM 642. Techniques in X-ray Crystallography Credit 2(1-3)
Methods needed for basic scattering of X-rays from atoms and production of diffraction patterns will be described. Fundamental information regarding crystal systems and space group identifications will also be discussed. Practical hands on laboratory experiments involving crystal growth techniques, crystal choice, mounting and data collection will be given. A laboratory method for solving at least one crystal structure is incorporated in the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 511 or graduate standing. (F;S)

CHEM 643. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics Credit 3(3-0)
Non-relativistic wave mechanics and its application to simple systems by means of the operator formulation will be studied. Prerequisites: CHEM 442 and PHYS 222. Corequisite: MATH 231. (S)

CHEM 651. General Biochemistry Credit 3(3-0)
This is a study of modern biochemistry. The course emphasizes chemical kinetics and energetics associated with biological reactions and includes a study of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, nucleic acids, hormones, photosynthesis, and respiration. Prerequisites: CHEM 431, 442 and 451. (S)

CHEM 652. General Chemistry Laboratory Credit 2(0-6)
This is a companion laboratory to CHEM 651. Experimentation will include isolation and characterization of biochemical substances and studies of physical properties. Students will be introduced to a variety of techniques including high performance liquid chromatography, electrophoresis, and centrifugation. Corequisite: CHEM 651. (S)

*Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for these general education courses.

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Zerihun Assefa
Professor and Chairperson
B.S., Addis Ababa University; Ph.D., University of Maine

Mufeed Basti
Professor
B.S., Baath University; Ph.D., Northern Illinois University

Ming Dong
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Hebei University of Technology; Ph.D., University of Delaware

Jahangir Emrani
Assistant Professor
B.S., Teacher’s University, Ph.D.,Indiana University

Marion Franks
Associate Professor
B.S., Clark-Atlanta University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Etta C. Gravely
Associate Professor
B.S., Howard University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Julius L. Harp
Associate Professor
B.S., York College; Ph.D., Howard University

Peng He
Assistant Professor
B.S., Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Margaret Kanipes-Spinks
Professor
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University

Debasish Kuila
Professor
B.S., University of Calcutta; M.S., Indian Institute of Technology, Madras; M. Phil. The City University of New York; Ph.D. The City University of New York

Claude N. Lamb
Associate Professor and Associate Chairperson
B.S., Mount Union College; M.S., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., Howard University

Tanya Malloy
Assistant Professor
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Wake Forest University

Tanya Pinder
Assistant Professor
B.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; Ph.D., Wake Forest University

Ginger P. Redd
Assistant Professor
B. S., Alcorn University; Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Divi Venteskateswarlu
Associate Professor
B.S., Sri University; M.S., Kakatiya University; M.S., University of Hyderabad; Ph.D., North Eastern Hill University

Zakiya Wilson
Associate Professor and Associate Dean of College of Arts and Sciences
B.S., Jackson State University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University