Department of Social Work and Sociology

http://www.ncat.edu/chhs/departments/swso/index.html

Arnold Barnes, Interim Chairperson

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The admission of the students to the undergraduate degree program in the Department of Social Work and Sociology is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. All majors are required to take courses in Sociology, Statistics and Research.

DEGREES OFFERED

Sociology – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Social Work – Bachelor of Social Work (Curriculum Guide)

SOCIOLOGY OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the Sociology Program are as follows:

  1. to provide students with analytic and systematic skills necessary to understand the problems inherent in societal relationships and to subsequently attempt to solve them,
  2. to prepare students for graduate study in the discipline,
  3. to provide a sociological background for departmental and university students who must meet major specific, general education or liberal arts requirements.

SOCIOLOGY REQUIREMENTS

Sociology Major – Completion of a minimum of  120 semester hours of University courses. Included in the 120 semester hours are 49 hours of sociology. A minimum grade of “C” must be achieved in these courses; sociology majors are required to complete an 18 hour concentration. Sociology majors are required to successfully complete a one semester internship in their senior year.

Comprehensive Examination: All students prior to graduation from the department must pass the Comprehensive Exam, which is given in the Senior Seminar class during the second semester of the senior year. Those who do not pass the exam will not be able to pass the Senior Seminar course with a “C” or better and hence will not be able to meet all the requirements for graduation from the University. The exam will be administered during the mid-semester and again, for those who need it, during regular exam time. NOTE: the Senior Seminar course can be repeated, if necessary, through Independent Study if recommended by the faculty). All sociology majors are required to join and participate in the Sociology/Social Work Society.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

A degree in sociology is preparatory for graduate study in sociology and can serve as the basic preparation for study of law, social work and public administration, entry into government service positions, applied research and education.

  • A BA in sociology is excellent preparation for future graduate work in sociology in order to become a professor, researcher, or applied sociologist.
  • The undergraduate degree provides a strong liberal arts preparation for entry level positions throughout the business, social service, and government worlds. Employers look for people with the skills that an undergraduate education in sociology provides.
  • Since its subject matter is intrinsically fascinating, sociology offers valuable preparation for careers in journalism, politics, public relations, business, or public administration – fields that involve investigative skills and working with diverse groups.
  • Many students choose sociology because they see it as a broad liberal arts base for professions such as law, education, medicine, social work, and counseling. Sociology provides a rich fund of knowledge the directly pertains to each of these fields.

SOCIAL WORK MISSION AND OBJECTIVES

Historically North Carolina A&T State University played a prominent role in the Civil Rights Movement. In the turbulence of 1960, four freshmen sat down at a segregated lunch counter in Greensboro, NC. Their actions inspired a national sit-in movement. Our history has influenced a program culture that emphasizes the Social Work profession’s commitment to ethical practice and social justice. Community Service opportunities are a part of required class volunteer hours.

The mission of North Carolina A&T State University’s BSW program is to prepare students through classroom interactions, field experiences, and extra curricula activities to engage in competent, ethical and evidence-based generalist practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The goals/objectives of the BSW program are to:

  1. Prepare students for generalist social work practice.
  2. Promote continued learning and critical thinking which builds on the broad knowledge base provided by the liberal arts perspective.
  3. Advance students’ capacity to become change agents in championing human rights and social, economic and environmental justice.
  4. Prepare students for graduate school and ongoing professional development.

North Carolina A&T State University’s BSW program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE); it’s most recent reaffirmation was granted by the Commission on Accreditation in June 2011. NCAT has a proud legacy as one of the oldest accredited BSW programs in the nation.

The mission of the BSW program is evidenced by an infused curriculum reflecting the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) 2015 Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). Our curriculum contains core values of service, social justice, the dignity and worth of the person, integrity, competence, human rights, and scientific inquiry. The curriculum of the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Program is structured to promote critical thinking, an appreciation of diversity, a commitment to high ethical standards, and an understanding of both the art and science of social work practice.

NCAT’s BSW program is grounded in the person and environment perspective. The competencies of the BSW program stem from the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Education Policies and Accreditation Standards (EPAS).

The Social Work competencies are:

  • Competency 1 – Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior
  • Competency 2 – Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice
  • Competency 3 – Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice
  • Competency 4 – Engage in Practice-Informed Research and Research-Informed Practice
  • Competency 5 – Engage in Policy Practice
  • Competency 6 – Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
  • Competency 7 – Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
  • Competency 8 – Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
  • Competency 9 – Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

SOCIAL WORK REQUIREMENTS

Social Work Major – Completion of a minimum of  120 semester hours of University courses. Included in the  120 credit hours are 64 credit hours in social work and cognate courses. A minimum grade of “C” must be achieved in English, Speech and all major courses. Formal program admission is required before taking any upper division social work courses. Students must have and maintain a 2.6 GPA or better. Social Work majors are required to successfully complete an internship their senior year. Professional liability insurance is required before entering the Field. Second degree seeking students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all social work, sociology, English, and speech courses required for the degree.

Students interested in participating in the Child Welfare E Collaborative should make their application during spring semester of their junior year, when they are applying for senior year field practicum placements.

Entering the program – Students desiring to change their major to Social Work (from another major) must have a 2.6 GPA or higher. Students must meet with the Bachelor of Social Work program director for an initial interview to assess the number of courses/semesters remaining for graduation. Students transferring from another university or community college should arrange a meeting with their advisor within the first week of school to assure that they are enrolled in the correct courses. All social work students will participate in a BSW application process prior to taking junior and senior level social work courses. This application process consists of attending an Information Session, completing a Personal Statement and meeting with their advisor.  Students must have successfully completed specific social work courses, maintained an overall 2.6 GPA, and completed a minimum of 45 credit hours. No academic credit is given for previous life experience.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

A degree in Social Work provides students with the competencies essential for immediate entry as a generalist into the professional field of social work. Career opportunities include but are not limited to departments of social services, mental health agencies, centers on aging, non-profit organizations, advocacy services, social justice organizations and various areas in the criminal justice system. The Social Work Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK

SOCI 100. Principles of Sociology Credit 3(3-0)
Basic concepts and principles in sociology as they are used to examine patterned and recurrent forms of social behavior will be studied.

SOCI 101. Basic Quantitative Writing and Computer Skills in Sociology Credit 3(3-0)
This course, to be taken concurrently with SOCI 100 – Principles of Sociology, is designed to provide students with basic computer skills needed to summarize and describe sociological data. The ability to perform elementary calculations, such as percentages, proportions, and ratios, along with utilization of graphing techniques is a prime objective. Other descriptive/summary statistical techniques emphasized include construction and interpretation of one- and two-variable tables. A third objective is to ensure that students can write a clear report in standard English on the methods and findings of elementary research.

SOCI 201. Origins of Social Thought Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes a review of the major historical sources, nature and growth of social thought as well as an introduction to the emergence of Sociological Theory in Europe and America in the 19th and early 20th centuries. (F)

SOCI 202. Social Theories Credit 3(3-0)
Social thought and theory in its development from Comte to the present will be studied. Prerequisite: SOCI 203, SOCI 204, and SOCI 201.

SOCI 203. Social Statistics I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to elementary statistical reasoning, descriptive statistics, frequency distribution, graphics, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Correlation and regression techniques are also taught.

SOCI 204. Social Problems Credit 3(3-0)
Major social problems in American society and their relationship to social structures will be studied. Prerequisite: SOCI 100.

SOCI 213. Social Statistics II Credit 3 (3-0)
Inferential statistics, probability, sampling distribution tests of significance as well as measures of association, analysis of variance, multivariate correlational analysis are taught. Prerequisite: SOCI 302.

SOCI 224. Social Aspects of Human Sexuality Credit 3(3-0)
Social aspects of human sexuality and American sexual behavior and its influence on life styles will be studied. Emphasis will be on social roles.

SOCI 306. Minority Group Relations Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an examination of racial and ethnic relations in society. The main focus is on intergroup relations within the United States, but a global comparative approach is also emphasized. It will present views from numerous perspectives within sociology, with special emphasis on the social psychological aspects of prejudice, discrimination, and differential power structures in society. In addition, the course utilizes a comparative-historical approach to intergroup relations.

SOCI 310. Social Research Method I Credit 3 (3-0)
This is an introductory course in social research methods; basic theory, principles and practical applications of data collection, analysis and interpretation. Includes study of research designs, measurement techniques, and sampling techniques used in survey research methods. Prerequisite: SOCI 203 or concurrent.

SOCI 373. Introduction to Population Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes a review of demographic processes; growth, fertility, mortality and migration in human populations. Focus on causes and consequences of demographic change in relation to social change and economic development. (S)

SOCI 406. Criminology Credit 3(3-0)
The genesis and origin of crime and an analysis of theories of criminal behavior will be studied.

SOCI 408. Independent Study I Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes independent research on a specific topic or a delineated area in sociology. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

SOCI 410. Reading for Honors in Sociology Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes intensive and extensive library research on topics in Sociology. Prerequisite: “B” average. (DEMAND)

SOCI 411. Sociology of Marriage and the Family Credit 3(3-0)
The family as a social institution and family types in cross-cultural perspectives will be studied.

SOCI 412. Social Stratification Credit 3(3-0)
This is a study of social inequalities and differentiation as related to social structures and social systems. Prerequisite: SOCI 203. (DEMAND)

SOCI 470. Senior Seminar Credit 4(4-0)
Research and discussions of professional and field issues related to sociology and social work will be studied. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

SOCI 472. Selected Issues in Sociology Credit 3(3-0)
Topics of current interest to sociologists and the student body are explored.

SOCI 475. Research Methods II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is continuation of SOCI 403. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing; minimum of 6 to 9 credits in statistics and research.

SOCI 498. Sociology/ Internship Credit 5(0-10)
This course is an internship to provide opportunities for students to enhance their employability by supervised experiences in selected agencies. Prerequisites: Senior standing and SOCI 310.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN SOCIAL WORK

SOWK 133. Introduction to Social Work Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to introduce students to the human services professions with emphasis on social work as a profession. It explores the human service professions from historical, sociological, political, and economic viewpoints. Students spend a minimum of 20 hours in a social agency.

SOWK 134. Social Work & Human Diversity Credit 3(3-0)
The purpose of this course is to prepare individuals to understand the impact of culture, ethnicity, race, disabilities, ageism, and sexual orientation on society, as well as on their own professional interactions. Prerequisites: SOWK 133, SOCI 100, or permission of the instructor.

SOWK 230. Social Welfare Policies and Services Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines social welfare legislation and policy. Students spend a minimum of 20 hours in a social agency.

SOWK 260. Major Problems of Family Functioning Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the dynamics of families experiencing major dysfunctions related to poverty, violence, the effects of deviant family members, and the social programs and policies relating to these problem areas. This course will enhance the student’s social work practice with families by increasing understanding of dysfunctional effects of these problems on the family system and its individual members and the relationship of policies and programs to the enhancement or deterioration of family life.

SOWK 270. The Community Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the social areas commonly defined as communities, and analyses of the social processes that occur within their boundaries. Community organization skills are taught as a vehicle to address social ills.

SOWK 285. Interviewing & Recording Skills Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the effective dimensions present in the helping process and an opportunity to learn and practice the skills.

SOWK 303. Juvenile Delinquency Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of sociological and psychological explanation relative to the causes and rehabilitation of juvenile delinquents, probation and treatment of juveniles within the criminal justice system.

SOWK 310. Human Behavior in the Social Environment I Credit 3(3-0)
This sequential course is a study of how biological, psychological, social and cultural dimensions of human behavior impinge upon every stage of the life cycle from infancy through adolescence. Knowledge is provided for the assessment of the development and behavior of families, groups, organizations, and communities. Prerequisites: SOWK 133, 134, 230 and 235. Acceptance into BSW program.

SOWK 315. Human Behavior in the Social Environment II Credit 3(3-0)
HBSE II builds upon content presented in SOWK 410 (HBSE I). Presents social systems theories, psychosocial theories, and developmental theories to examine why people behave as they do and to apply this knowledge to generalist social work practice across the later-half of the life span. This second course in the HBSE sequence explores the impact of socio-cultural, socio-historical, socio-political, and economic forces on individuals and social systems, and utilizes a diversity perspective to evaluate the effects of culture, social class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation. This course also introduces the students to macro issues within social work practice as adults interact with larger social systems. Prerequisites: SOWK 133, 134, 230, and 285. Acceptance into BSW program.

SOWK 320. Feminization of Poverty Credit 3(3-0)
This three credit, upper division social work elective explores the status of women. It gives an historical look at women and the global perceptions of women, then focuses on women in the 20th & 21st centuries, in the U.S.  The status of women is explored through the lenses of feminism with special emphasis on the impoverishment of women.

SOWK 325. Honors Seminar in Social Service Credit 3(3-0)
Selected topics in social welfare are extensively studied and discussed. Prerequisites: Junior standing and “B” average. (DEMAND) 

SOWK 350. Introduction to International Social Work
This course examines international social work, its definition, history, theoretical perspectives, skills, ethical guidelines and the variety of settings and populations served  The topics explored are covered via video conferencing.

SOWK 360. Global Issues in Human Services
This course examines global issues and the strategies used to assess and intervene in social issues from a social work framework. The topics explored are covered via video conferencing.

SOWK 372. Child Welfare I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to develop cognitive skills as they relate to the history and development of child welfare. Students will review needs of children and evaluate the extent to which parents/society are able to meet their needs.

SOWK 390. Independent Study Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes independent research in a delineated area of social welfare. Prerequisites: Only Sociology/Social Work Majors and consent of the instructor.

SOWK 398. Practicum in the Community Credit 5(0-16)
This course includes the selection of a community problem, study and analysis of the problem followed by corrective activities, when possible. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

SOWK 409. Disability and Employment Credit 3(3-0)
This course will focus on selected mental, physical, and social disabilities, and their implications for coping and employment. (DEMAND)

SOWK 423. Introduction to Family Therapy Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the rapidly developing field of family therapy. A brief overview of family therapy will be presented, along with explanation of the similarities and the difference with other therapies. Several models of practices and technique will be presented. (DEMAND)

SOWK 421. Reading for Honors in Social Welfare Credit 3(3-0)
Extensive library research in selected areas of social welfare is required. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and “B” average. (DEMAND)

SOWK 424. Social Work Practice I Credit 3(2-2)
This course is designed to reinforce the knowledge and develop the skills essential for generalist social work practice. Various methods are offered for developing intervention skills with individuals, families and small groups in a variety of settings. SOWK 133, 134, 285, 310, 315 and 430. Taken concurrently with SOWK 487 and 489. Acceptance into BSW program.

SOWK 425. Social Work Practice II Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a continuation of skill development. Emphasis is placed on social work intervention in larger systems (organizations, groups and communities). Attention is given to further understanding the dynamic relationship between people and their environment, the conflicting issues in social work practice, and the impact of various settings on practice. Prerequisites: SOWK 424. Taken concurrently with SOWK 489 and 492. Acceptance into BSW program.

SOWK 472. Child Welfare II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an examination of philosophies and institutional systems that impact on child welfare. This course will examine influences of such issues as racism, sexism, women’s liberation, and child advocacy. Major institutions (educational, court/legal, health care, economic, political) will be examined to identify and evaluate effects. (DEMAND)

SOWK 487. Field Education I Credit 5(0-16)
In this practicum, student will apply course-based knowledge and skills by working in a social service setting. A total of 220 internship hours are required. Prerequisites: SOWK 133, 134, 230, 285, 310, and 315. Taken concurrently with SOWK 424 and 489. Acceptance into BSW program. Professional liability insurance required before entering the Field.

SOWK 489. Field Education Seminar I Credit 1(1-0)
The first of a two-semester sequence, provides the forum for students to discuss their implementation of basic social work skills and interventions in their field practicum settings. Students will examine their personal values, as well as conflicting values and ethical dilemmas regarding the populations with whom they practice. Students are expected to develop skills that are essential to the micro level of social work practice. Prerequisites: SOWK 133, 134, 230, 285, 310 and 315. Taken concurrently with SOWK 424.

SOWK 492. Field Education Seminar II Credit 1(1-0)
The second of a two-semester sequence, provides the forum for students to continue discussing their implementation of generalist social work skills and interventions. Students are encouraged to share a range of learning, experiences encountered in different work settings as they continue to examine and evaluate their professionalism. Students are expected to develop skills and proficiencies that are essential to the micro level of social work practice. Prerequisites: SOWK 489 and 424. Taken concurrently with SOWK 425.

SOWK 497. Senior Seminar Credit 4(4-0)
This course includes research and discussion of professional and field issues related to careers in sociology and social work. Prerequisite: Senior status.

SOWK 498. Field Education II Credit 5(0-16)
In this second sequential practicum, students will build on their generalist foundational knowledge and skills by working in a social service setting providing direct intervention to populations-at-risk, carrying professional level case loads. A total of 220 internship hours are required. SOWK 487, 489 424. Taken concurrently with SOWK 492 and 425.

SOSW 400. Intimate Partner and Domestic Violence
This course builds upon research in the cultural theoretical perspectives of domestic and intimate partner violence at the micro-, exo-, meso-, and macrosystem levels. Student learning will be centered on the cognitive-affective-ecological conceptual framework. Students will explore the various forms of abusive behavior in families belonging to four major ethnic minority communities in the United States as well as international communities. Students will look at other areas of abuse and violence as they relate to religious practices, economic marginalization, and gender. Students are required to explore their own assumptions which have caused them to express prejudices and have supported oppression; address personal issues of abuse behavior and/or domestic and intimate partner violence.

INTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES

SOCI 200. Introduction to Anthropology Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes an analysis and comparison of primitive cultures and further comparisons with modern cultures.

SOCI 300. Topics in Cultural Anthropology Credit 3(3-0)
Selected topics in language, culture, mythology, and religion designed to acquaint students with analyzing cultural patterning in this and other cultures will be studied.

SOCI 301. Sociology of Religion Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to primarily explore the practices, social structures, historical backgrounds, development, universal themes, and roles of religion in society. Course content include the exploration of views of religion from classical sociologists (Marx, Weber, and Durkheim) as well as contemporary sociologists of religion. Various types of religious groups such as ecclesias, denominations, and cults/sects are also discussed.

SOCI 307. Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to introduce students to basic sociological concepts associated with social entrepreneurship. Special emphasis is placed on how non-profit organizations are created, maintained, and structured. (F;S)

SOCI 351. Anthropological Experience Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an exploration of anthropological theories and research methods with an emphasis on qualitative research methods. (DEMAND)

SOCI 416. Sociology of Mental Health Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a sociocultural variation in the assessment of sociopathological and psychopathological aspects of mental disorder. A critical analysis of institutions of mental health care, consideration of the etiology of mental illness, typologies, and social policies relative to the phenomenon of mental health will also be included. Prerequisite: SOCI 100. (DEMAND)

SOCI 420. Human Evolution in Ecological Perspective Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines human cultural and biological evolution using an ecological perspective. (DEMAND)

SOCI 421. Seminar in Cultural Factors in Communication Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed both to sensitize the student to the importance of cultural factors in nonverbal and verbal communication and to equip the student with ways to record and analyze this behavior.

SOCI 450. Independent Study in Anthropology Credit 3(3-0)
This course enables the student to do readings and research in anthropology in cooperation with the instructor. (DEMAND)

SOCI 498. Sociology/Social Service Internship Credit 5(0-10)
This course is an internship to provide opportunities for students to enhance their employability by supervised experiences in selected agencies.

SOWK 280. Black Experience Credit 3(3-0)
This is a topical seminar focusing on commonly shared experiences of American Blacks in selected social institutions. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

SOWK 303. Juvenile Delinquency Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of sociological and psychological explanation relative to the causes and rehabilitation of juvenile delinquents, probation and treatment of juveniles within the criminal justice system.

SOWK 370. Introduction to Gerontology Credit 3(3-0)
Aging and its implication in social institutions are studied.

SOWK 496. Independent Study II Credit 3(3-0)
Prerequisite: Six hours of statistics, and/or research. (DEMAND)

SOSW 415. Medical Sociology Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes sociological analysis of medical services, the role of the sick professional organizations and quasi-professional groups; socializational structure of hospitals; sociodemographic and socioepidemiologic variables in relation to modern societies. Cultural and cross-cultural customs and traditions affecting attitudes toward health and the healing art will also be studied. (DEMAND)

Note: Sociology 100, Sociology 101, Sociology 203, Sociology 204, Social Work 133, and SOSW 669 are the only courses scheduled to be taught each semester. Other courses are taught once per year and students must follow the curriculum sheets.

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Soonok An
Assistant Professor
B.A., M.A., Chungbuk National University; M.S.W., Ph.D., University of Georgia

Arnold Barnes
Associate Professor and Interim Chairperson
B.A., M.S.W., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Washington University (St. Louis, MO)

Phillip Carey
Professor
B.S, M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University

Jilan Li
Assistant Professor of Social Work
B.S., Southwest University People’s Republic of China; M.S., Southwest University, People’s Republic of Chica; M.S.W., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Wayne Moore
Professor
B.S., East Carolina University; M.S.W., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina

Maura Nsonwu
Associate Professor and Interim Director of BSW Program
B.S., University of North Carolina; M.S.W., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Sharon Parker
Associate Professor
B.A., Greensboro College; MSW University of Pittsburgh; PhD., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jeffrey Shears
Professor
BSW., M.Ed., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University; PhD., University of Denver

Elizabeth Watson
Assistant Professor and Co-Director of BSW Field
B.S., Columbia Union College; M.S.W., Howard University; Ph.D., Andrews University

Chiquitia Welch-Brewer
Assistant Professor
B.A., Cleveland State University; M.S.S.A., Case Western Reserve; Ph.D.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill