Department of English

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/cas/english/index.html

Valerie Nieman, Interim Chairperson

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the English Department are as follows:

  1. to provide instruction in reading and writing skills, the humanities, linguistics, and literature;
  2. to prepare English majors and minors to teach and to pursue graduate training in English and other professions;
  3. to train students in professional writing.

DEGREES OFFERED

English – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
English (African-American Literature) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
English (Technical Writing) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
English (Creative Writing) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
English (Secondary Education) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The admission of students to the undergraduate programs in the Department of English is based upon the general admission requirements of the University.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

English major – The English major must complete 120 semester hours of University courses. Included in the 120 semester hours are a minimum of 66 hours of English at the 200 level or above for the professional major. A minimum grade of “C” must be achieved in these courses.

The teaching major in English must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours of University courses. Included in these 120 hours are 54 semester hours of English courses at the 200 level or above with grades of “C” or better.

English (African-American Literature) – To complete a concentration in African American Literature, the student must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours of University courses. Included in these 120 hours are 96 semester hours of English courses at the 200 level or above with grades of “C” or better.

English (Creative Writing) – To complete a concentration in Creative Writing, the student must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours of University courses. Included in these 120 semester hours of University are 75 semester hours of English courses at the 200 level or above with grades of “C” or better.

English (Technical Writing) – To complete a concentration in Technical Writing, the student must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours of University courses. Included in these 120 hours are 75 semester hours of English courses at the 200 level or above with grades of “C” or better.

The Minor in English (teaching and non-teaching) Students desiring a minor in English must complete 18 semester hours in English courses. A total of nine (9) hours must consist of three (3) hours in each of the following areas:

  • English Literature: ENGL 220 or 221 (3 hrs.)
  • African American Literature: ENGL 333 or 334 (3 hrs.)
  • American Literature: ENGL 430 or 431 (3 hrs.)

A student must complete at least 24 hours of academic credits before declaring a minor and must have minimum GPA of 2.0. A Student may not have more than two (2) minors. A student also must take nine (9) hours of English courses from the 200 level or above.

COMMON COURSES FOR ALL CONCENTRATIONS

A.    Required Major Core Courses for All Concentrations in English (24 hours): ENGL 210, ENGL 220, ENGL 410, ENGL 430, ENGL 431

B.    Required English Capstone Course

ENGL 502-I. Independent Study in English

The Capstone Course or the Integrative Capstone Experience is designed to incorporate multiple knowledge areas consistent with the goals and objectives of the English program. The Capstone Course in English provides an opportunity for majors to pursue independently (at home or abroad) in depth study in English Literature, African American Literature, English Technical Writing, Creative Writing, or Linguistics.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

A degree in English prepares students to teach, to conduct research, to pursue graduate and professional degrees (such as law and library science), and to work in government, business, editing, and numerous other jobs requiring mastery of the language.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ENGLISH
Undergraduate

ENGL 100. Ideas and Their Expression I Credit 3(3-0)
This course helps prepare students for academic work by: (1) providing instruction in the foundational elements of writing; (2) focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts; (3) emphasizing the development of ideas through varied rhetorical strategies; and (4) providing an introduction to library research. (F;S;Sum)

ENGL 101. Ideas and Their Expression II Credit 3(3-0)
This course continues the student’s growth as a writer through: (1) providing a review of the foundational elements of writing and methods of developing essays; (2) providing further development of critical thinking and analysis skills; (3) teaching the construction of argument; and (4) providing a study of research skills and writing a research paper.

ENGL 102. Developmental Reading Credit 2(2-0)
This course includes instruction and practice in methods of  increasing rate of reading and techniques of comprehending written material; emphasis is upon vocabulary skills. Limited registration.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN HUMANITIES

ENGL 200. Survey of Humanities I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of interrelationships of literature, music, and the fine arts; it is a study of master works, philosophical ideas, and artistic movements of Western Civilization, with attention given also to non-Western culture. It will survey cultures from ancient times to the end of the Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 201. Survey of Humanities II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of ENGL 200. It will begin with the Baroque period and will include Neo-Classicism. Romanticism, and modern modes of artistic expression. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 and 200. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 202. The Humanities in America Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a survey of the interrelationship of American and African-American literature, music, and art from colonial times to the present. The course will also include a study of the American historical, social, and philosophical experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (DEMAND)

ENGL 203. Humanities Perspectives of the South Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the South from the perspectives of its history, beliefs, literature, music, and art. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S)

ENGL 204. Topics in Humanities: A Multidisciplinary Course Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of selected topics in literature, art, music, philosophy, and other branches of the humanities. It is an elective course primarily for non-English majors. Prerequisite:ENGL 101. (DEMAND)

ENGL 206. Film and Culture Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines film as a legitimate form of artistic expression worthy of serious critical analysis. Consequently, film will be studied as history (including its relationship to other print and non-print media), aesthetic theory, ideology, and cultural artifact. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which film not only reflects, but also shapes, contemporary culture. (F;S)

ENGL 234. Screenwriting: Adapting History for Film Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces students to the craft of screenplay writing based on a specific historical event, person, or place. Students will research a historical phenomenon, adapt it into a compelling story, and employ the craft of screenwriting to share that story. Students will also analyze and evaluate professional screenplays and understand how they are unique to the film medium. Finally, students will apply craft specific techniques to their own creative works and share their screenplays in a workshop environment. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S;S)

ENGL 235. Introduction to the Art and Craft of Screenwriting Credit 3(3-0)
This course is intended to develop the student’s understanding of the business and craft of screenplays. Students will write screenplays through the process of composing and revision. They will also learn about contests, fellowships, agents, registering screenplays and career opportunities. Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and 101. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 420. Humanities III, Great Ideas of World Civilization Credit 3(3-0)
This is a seminar devoted to the identification, analysis, and appreciation of some of the basic ideas or concepts which have underlain world culture in the arts, religion, philosophy, and social attitudes from ancient times to the present. (DEMAND)

LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

ENGL 226. The Basic Grammar and Mechanics of Writing Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes instruction and review of the most troubling grammatical and mechanical errors that plague college students’ writing. All writing in this course will be limited to the context of well-developed paragraphs. There will be frequent practice in identifying and avoiding common grammatical and mechanical errors. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 240. Advanced Grammar and Argumentation Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the techniques of argumentation and the logic of grammar essential to both higher level writing and teaching in middle and high schools. (F)

ENGL 300. Advanced Composition Credit 3(3-0)
This is a course for non-English majors in which techniques of narrative, descriptive, expository and argumentative composition are studied. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 404. Writing in the Discipline of English Credit 3(3-0)
This course offers practice in critical, scholarly, and expository writing that emphasizes writing within the discipline of English. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (DEMAND)

ENGL 405. Introduction to Linguistics and the History of the Language Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the nature of language, levels of linguistic analysis, dialectology, comparative linguistics, and the development of the English language. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

ENGL 445. Independent Study in English Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue independently (at home and abroad) in-depth study in English Literature, African American Literature, English Technical Writing, Creative Writing, or Linguistics, culminating in a manuscript, report, or scholarly article suitable for publication. Prerequisites: Senior standing, completion of all General Education requirements, and prior consultation with department faculty. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 490. Professional Writing Internship Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes on-the-job training with an appropriate agency and compilation of a portfolio of high caliber. Prerequisites: ENGL 261 and 480. (DEMAND)

ENGL 629. Dimensions of Literacy
This course introduces students to the various dimensions of Literacy. Literacy will be studied from linguistic, cognitive, sociocultural, developmental and educational perspectives, linking theory and research to practice. The topical foci include the nature of language, oral-written language relations, reading comprehension, writing processes, literacy as social practice and the teaching of literacy skills. Prerequisite: Senior standing or by Permission of Instructor. (F;S; Sum)

ENGL 630. Sociolinguistics Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces students to the study of language in social contexts. Students will explore the relationship between language and society by examining language variations among difference cultures, genders and societal positions. The course focuses on how language both constructs and is constructed by identity in reference to language and power, vernacular dialects, pidgins and creoles, language and gender differences, and technologies’ impact on language use and reception. Prerequisites: Senior Standing or above, or by Permission of Instructor. (F;S;Sum)

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

ENGL 209. The History, Literary Connections, and Social Relevance of Hip-Hop Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on the study of hip-hop as an artistic literary phenomenon which reflects elements of the Black experience and voices the concerns of a large and diverse segment of African-Americans in contemporary society. The following will be examined: the origins of hip-hop; the relationship of hip-hop to the oral literary tradition; the literary elements of hip-hop, as well as hip-hop’s connection to literary movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement; the ability of hip-hop to articulate social ills as well as the concerns of urban and poor African-Americans; and significant hip-hop artists, their lyrics, performances, and impact. Prerequisites: ENGL 101This course is open to non-majors. (F;S)

ENGL 316. Hip-Hop Discourse Credit 3(3-0)
This course will analyze, critique, and discuss the literature and critical discourses that examine hip-hop culture. Assigned readings will consist of the most current theoretical, political, and social dialogue/texts that provide a framework for class discussion and writing assignments. Some of the major areas of focus are as follows: the major movements and themes of hip-hop; the relationship between the predominant American culture and hip-hop; the new Black Renaissance – hip-hop culture literature, and the commercialization of hip-hop. Prerequisites:ENGL 101. This course is open to non-majors of sophomore, junior, or senior standing. (F;S)

ENGL 318. African-American Film and Culture Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines African-American film as an interpreter of the history and culture of African-Americans. Attention will be given to the aesthetic theory and ideology of Black film and culture. Prerequisites:ENGL 101. This course is open to non-majors. (F;S)

ENGL 333. Survey of African-American Literature I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of prose, poetry, and drama by American authors of African ancestry from the 18th century to the turn of the 20th century. Students will explore African-American literature, tracing its origins through the Diaspora and the period of slavery in America to the beginning of the 20th century. Important movements, authors, and works will be examined in both a literary and historical sense so that an understanding and knowledge of the Black experience through its literature may be acquired. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. (F;S)

ENGL 334. Survey of African-American Literature II Credit 3 (3-0)
This is a survey course focusing on literature written by African-Americans from the beginning of the 20th century to the present.  Students will study exciting literary periods, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement, as well as modern and contemporary Black writers. Important movements, authors, and works will be examined in both a literary and historical sense. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. (F;S)

ENGL 342. African-American Male Writers Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the poetry, short stories, and novels of significant African-American male writers from the 20th century to the present. Focus will be given to the literary and historical elements which reflect the African-American male’s experience in America, as well as his contributions to and place within the African-American literary tradition. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. This course is open to non-majors. (F;S)

ENGL 343. African-American Women Writers Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the poetry, short stories, and novels of significant Black women writers from the 20th century to the present. Focus will be given to the literary and historical elements which reflect the African-American woman’s experience as well as her place within and contribution to the African-American literary tradition. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. This course is open to non-majors. (F;S)

ENGL 345. The Survey of African-American Men’s and Women’s Autobiographical Writings Credit 3(3-0)
This course surveys the genre of autobiographical writing from the 18th century to the 20th century as expression of the Black experience in America from slavery to freedom. Focus will be given to the historical and literary importance of major autobiographical writers, as well as their works – particularly slave narratives, letters, and other forms of autobiographical writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 333 or ENGL 334.

ENGL 407. African-American Drama Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the dramatic literature of African-Americans, from the 20th century to the present. Focus will be given to the literary, historical, and cultural elements of the Black tradition of drama. Prerequisites: UNST 110; ENGL 333 or 334. This course is open to non-majors. (F)

ENGL 408. The African-American Novel Credit 3(3-0)
This course will focus on the careful reading and discussion of the African-American novel from the 20th century to the present. Attention will be given to the various aspects of the traditions that have nourished the African-American novel as an art form and cultural interpreter of the Black experience in America. Among the authors’ works to be examined are Zora Neale Hurston, John A. Williams, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, and Gloria Naylor. Prerequisites:ENGL 101; ENGL 334 or 334. This course is open to non-majors. (S)

ENGL 416. Major African Women Writers Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the works by major women writers from modern Africa. The thematic focus may be, but should not be exclusive to critical issues like feminism ad the contestation with colonialism and patriarchy. Old and new generation post-independence African women’s works will be studied. Readings from fiction, poetry, and drama will be selected from the works of Bessie Head, Tsitsi Dangaremba, Flora Nwapa, Efua Sutherland, Theodora Akachi Ezeigbo, Chimamanda Adichie, Yvonne Vera, Nawal El Saadawi, Nadine Gordimer, Buchi Emecheta, Zulu Sofola, Rebecca Njau, Mariama Ba, Ngcobo and so on. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F)

EENGL 417. African Literature Credit 3(3-0)
This course surveys the literary genres and major authors of African literature and shows the relationship between modern African literature and African oral traditions, culture, and history. Texts will be selected from West, East, South, and North Africa. Prerequisites: ENGL 101.

ENGL 494. Interdisciplinary Research Methods in African-American Literary Studies (formerly ENGL 505) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is open only to junior and senior English majors and minors. It involves an interdisciplinary approach as well as practice in the research, documentation, and critical analyses of African-American literary studies. Students will discover, compile, and evaluate resources from across the disciplines that relate to the impact African-American literature and literary studies through using computer-based and traditional sources. This course will culminate in the students’ completion of a final project which will include a writing assignment in conjunction with hosting an interdisciplinary literary colloquium, organizing and participating in an interdisciplinary literary conference, or publishing their papers. Prerequisites: This course is only open to junior and senior English majors and minors. (S)

CREATIVE WRITING

ENGL 105. Introduction to Creative Writing Credit 3(3-0)
This course is for beginners in creative writing which introduces students to writing in various genres by means of creative exercises and assignments, workshops, and individual conferences. A multi-genre text on creative writing will be assigned to support the reading and analyses of published works. (Genres may include poetry, fiction, plays, and creative non-fiction.) Course may be repeated for a different focus, and there are no prerequisites. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 208. Spoken Word Performance Poetry Troupe I: A Practicum Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to develop and enhance the skills of individual student performers of the A&T Premier Spoken Word Troupe. Students will be instructed in the history and practice of the genre Spoken Word Performance Poetry through the study of the art form’s development since the late sixties and seventies through to the current period. Influences on the art form such as Blues, Jazz, and Hip-hop will be covered. (This course can be taken more than once.) Student enrollment in this course is based on individual audition and/or by permission of the instructor. (F;S)

ENGL 311. Intermediate Fiction Writing Credit 3(3-0)
Students will write and revise short fiction. A text on fiction writing will be assigned to support the reading and analyses of published fiction, including the following: developing characters, writing dialogue and managing point of view, as well as exploring techniques in narrative design in published stories. Students will also receive encouragement and constructive criticism from other writers in class, and develop the ability to criticize their own work. Contemporary authors such as Raymond Carver, Alice Walker, John Edgar Wideman, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, Edwidge Danticat and Eudora Welty will be studied. Prerequisites: ENGL 105, 210, and a survey course in British, American, or World Literature. (F)

ENGL 312. Intermediate Poetry Writing Credit 3(3-0)
Students will study the craft of writing and revising poetry. A text on contemporary poetry writing will be assigned to support the reading and analyses of published poetry. The course will examine literary devices, such as diction, imagery, metaphor, rhyme, sound values, line units, meter, and forms. This study will be supported by a workshop devoted entirely to analyzing and discussing student poems. Contemporary authors such as Lucille Clifton, Joy Harjo, Yusef Kumunyakaa, Thylias Moss, Adrienne Rich, Michael Harper, Sharon Olds, Audre Lorde, Amira Baraka, Ethridge Knight, Naomi Shihab, Nye Haki Madhubuti, and Rita Dove will be studied.  Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 210, and a survey course in British, American, and World Literature. (F)

ENGL 313. Drama Writing Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces the student to the study and practice of the various elements of contemporary dramatic writing. A text on contemporary dramatic writing will be assigned to support the reading and analyses of published plays. Course topics will include format, story structure, character development, dialogue, building scenes and writing for a visual medium. Prerequisites: ENGL 101, and 210, and a survey course in British, American, or World Literature. (DEMAND)

ENGL 314. Workshop in Creative Nonfiction Writing Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces the student to the study and practice of the various forms of literary nonfiction. A text on creative nonfiction writing will be assigned to support the reading and analyses of published works. The student writer will develop skill in the incorporation of techniques from creative writing, such as point of view, voice, characterization and dialogue. Discussion will center around works in progress as well as works by contemporary essayists, such as Katha Pollitt, Alice Walker, James Baldwin, Jewelle Gomez and Barry Lopez. Other areas of nonfiction which may be covered can include memoir, autobiography, nature writing and the personal essay. Prerequisites: ENGL 105 and 210. (DEMAND)

ENGL 315. Editing Encore I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is one in which students assist the student editor-in-chief in selecting, editing, and laying out editions of the University literary magazine sponsored by the Creative Writing Program. Prerequisites: ENGL 311, 312, 313 or 314. May be repeated. (F;S)

ENGL 327. Editing Encore II Credit 3(3-0)
This course, at the discretion of the program director, permits a student to serve as editor-in-chief. The student will work in conjunction with academic literary advisors and other student editors to edit the University literary magazine sponsored by the Creative Writing Program. Copy editing, layout, design, and aspects of distribution will be covered. Aptitude with digital and online media, as well as desktop and print publishing is essential. May be repeated. Prerequisites: ENGL 311, 312, or 313, 315, 327. (F;S) 

ENGL 330. Creative Literary Production and Service in Society Credit 3(3-0)
The goal of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to apply their practice and understanding of creative writing to practical and concrete situations in their communities with groups such as the elderly in community and senior centers, teen groups and elementary students. Students will work in a variety of community settings – educational, political, and/or social service agencies – according to the availability/needs of such groups. Prerequisites: ENGL 105, 311, 312, 313 or 314. (DEMAND)

ENGL 421. Advanced Fiction Workshop Credit 3(3-0)
This course offers advanced work in techniques of writing fiction for students with substantial experience in writing fiction. Classes are conducted as workshop sessions primarily where each student must comment on the manuscript of fellow students. In the course of critiquing techniques of fiction writing, such as establishment of character, manipulation of viewpoint, use of setting, and such matters as consistency, motivation, imagery, plotting, and theme will be covered. Prerequisites: An “A” of “B” in ENGL 311 or permission of the instructor upon review of a writing sample. (This course is limited to students with a concentration in creative writing, who have completed one of the following advanced courses: ENGL 311, 312, 313, or 314.) (F)

ENGL 422. Advanced Poetry Workshop Credit 3(3-0)
This course offers advanced work in techniques of writing poetry for students with substantial experience in writing poetry. The course will consist of workshop sessions with students commenting on each other’s work.  Students will be asked to pick several poets for a paper and an oral report. Prerequisites: An “A” or “B” in ENGL 312 or permission of the instructor. (This course is limited to students with a concentration in creative writing, who have completed one of the following advanced courses: ENGL 311, 312, 313, or 314.) (F)

ENGL 418. Special Topics in Creative Writing Credit 3(3-0)
Topics in this course might include “Style and Technique in African American Writing,” “Style and Technique in Third World Writing,” “Autobiography,” “Prose and Poetry,” “Poetry and Performance,” “Novel Writing,” “Science Fiction Writing,” “Literature of Protest,” “Poetry Translation,” “Literature and Film,” “Literature of the Black Diaspora,” and “Oral History.” The course may be repeated for a different focus. Prerequisites: ENGL 311, 312, or 313. (S;S)

ENGL 419. Writer in Residence Writing Workshop Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes a two day writing workshop in Poetry, Fiction, Creative Nonfiction. A course in writing is taught by the Visiting Writer in Residence. Enrollment is limited to specially selected students. Prospective enrollees should apply to the seminar committee and be prepared to submit writing samples for admittance before registering. The course is structured as a workshop and may be repeated for credit if the specific title and instructors are different. Prerequisites: ENGL 311, 312, 313 or 314. (F;S)

ENGL 495. Creative Senior Seminar (formerly ENGL 504) Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes intensive reading, creative writing and discussion. The course will also entail practice and studies of the form, craft, and theory of various genres. Topics may include: “Women’s Poetics –  Ancient to Contemporary,”  “Multicultural Poetics,”  “Problems of Adaptation, Poetry, Personae, and Author,”  “Studies in Manuscript Development,” “Studies in Short Fiction,” “Literature and Translation,” and “Political Poetry.” Prerequisites: Completion of one workshop sequence (Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Workshop) in at least one genre. (F)

ENGL 497. Creative Thesis (formerly ENGL 506) Credit 3(3-0)
Students will propose a special writing project  to be completed in conference and workshop. The project will be suitable for inclusion in a portfolio for graduate school applications and, in some instances, for submission to a publisher. The semester’s work will include a project proposal and the compilation of a creative manuscript draft. The semester’s work will also include the completion of a critical analysis and the defense and final edition of the thesis. Prerequisites: Completion of one workshop sequence (Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced Workshop) in at least one genre. (F;S)

LITERATURE

ENGL 205. Topics in Literature Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of selected topics in literature. It is an elective course primarily for non-English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (DEMAND)

ENGL 210. Introduction to Literary Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course is required of English majors and minors and open to others only with approval of instructor; the critical analysis, literary criticism, investigative and bibliographical techniques necessary to advanced study in English will be studied. This course is a prerequisite for all advanced courses in literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S)

ENGL 220. English Literature I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a survey of the literary movements and major authors of English literature in relation to the cultural history of England from Beowulf to 1660 Prerequisites: ENGL 101, HIST 100 and 101. (F)

ENGL 221. English Literature II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of ENGL 220 from 1660 to 1830. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. (S)

ENGL 224. Contemporary Women’s Literature: A World View Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed as an introduction to world literature focusing on the twentieth century and features literature from geographically and culturally diverse peoples. It is not intended to serve as a survey (historically or geographically) of world literature. This course allows students to work closely with a limited number of texts (poetry, fiction, essay and drama), which will reflect a view of world cultures from a decidedly feminist vantage point. The class will analyze how this literature is unique and similar to western literature. The class will view films and other works related to intercultural experiences and clashes. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (DEMAND) (F;S;SS)

ENGL 230. World Literature I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a survey of selected major world writers from ancient times to about 1600. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and ENGL 101. (F)

ENGL 231. World Literature II Credit 3(3-0)
This course surveys selected major world writers from about 1600 to the present, excluding English and American. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (S)

ENGL 232. Women Writers in Science Fiction Credit 3(3-0)
This survey course will look at Science Fiction written by women, examine their work, their themes, and their values.

ENGL 245. American Crime Fiction: Violent Literature of Place, Race, and Class Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on the study and practice of literature through reading crime fiction. Students will study how literature functions and how literature is used.  Short stories, novels, and nonfiction will be examined for their historical, social, cultural, and psychological significance. Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and 101. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 233. Images of Women in Literature Credit 3(3-0)
This course uses period literature by both male and female authors to examine the changing roles and attitudes toward women in Europe and American societies. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 236. A Survey of Early African-American Women’s Poetry Credit 3(3-0)
This survey course focuses on poetry written by African American women from the 18th century to the end of Reconstruction. Students will gain an understanding and knowledge of the African American experience from the perspective of African American women.

ENGL 237. Standing and Testifying: African American Women Poets of the Harlem Renaissance Credit 3(3-0)
This is a survey course focusing on the poetry written by African American women during the period of the Harlem Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (DEMAND)

ENGL 239. American Griots: Black Women Storytellers in the 20th Century Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on the short stories written by African American women during the 20th century. It examines the diversity, history, and literary techniques of Black women short story writers and shows how their work has evolved along with formal practices of the genre to the present time. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (DEMAND)

ENGL 241. Women Writers Credit 3(3-0)
This course offers a study of literature and feminist theories by women from the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (DEMAND)

ENGL 242. Postcolonial Women Writers Credit 3(3-0)
This course offers a study of literature and feminist theories by postcolonial women from the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, India, Oceania, Asia, and the Balkans. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 243. Literature by Women of Africa and the African Diaspora Credit 3(3-0)
This course offers a study of literature and feminist/womanist theories by Anglo-African, African American, Caribbean, Latin-American, and African women. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (DEMAND)

ENGL 336. Postcolonial Novel Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces novels and theory post-1960 from areas including the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, the Balkans, India, Asia, and Oceania. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (S)

ENGL 401. Drama Credit 3(3-0)
This course surveys the history, literature, criticism, and arts of the theatre. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (S)

ENGL 406. Critical Theory Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines interpretive strategies and theoretical assumptions of contemporary approaches to literary criticism. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (S)

ENGL 410. Shakespeare Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to a study of the works of William Shakespeare through a detailed examination of representative works selected from the major periods of his development as a dramatist. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (S)

ENGL 430. American Literature I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the literary movements and major authors of American literature in relation to the cultural history of America from the Colonial Period to 1865. Prerequisites: ENGL 210, ENGL 200, and 201. (F)

ENGL 431. American Literature II Credit 3(3-0)
This is a continuation of English 430, from 1865 to the present. Prerequisites: ENGL 210, ENGL 200, and 201. (S)

ENGL 435. The Novel Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the novel as an art form, with attention to significant English novelists from 1750 to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (F)

ENGL 436. Poetry Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of poetry as an art form, with attention to significant English and American poets of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 210. (S)

ENGL 445. Independent Study in English Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue independently in-depth study in literature, linguistics, or professional writing. Prerequisites: Second semester junior or senior standing, and prior consultation with department faculty. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 460. Technology and the Teaching of English Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides knowledge of how technology, especially the computer and non-print media, can be utilized effectively in the teaching of English and in classroom management. Students will acquire knowledge of various instructional strategies appropriate for diverse backgrounds and learning styles. Development of appropriate professional attitudes and incorporation of research findings in the instructional program will also be included. (S)

ENGL 475. British and American Literary History Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to develop a sense of the continuity of British and American literary history, supported by a reading of major works. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (DEMAND)

ENGL 492. Senior Seminar Credits 3(3-0)
This course intensively explores major figures, periods, or ideas in African American, American, British, World or Comparative Literature while emphasizing independent study and refines the techniques of literary research and critical analysis. Prerequisites: ENGL 404 and 406. (F;S)

ENGL 503. Senior Honors Thesis Credits 3(3-0)
This course allows students with a GPA in English of 3.2 or above to complete an in-depth research project in their area of interest. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S)

TECHNICAL WRITING

ENGL 320. International Technical Writing Credits 3(3-0)
This course will examine white papers and government documents related to business development from emerging business markets. Students will also look at documentaries and read literature about global markets to understand existing business and cultural relationships. Finally, students will examine the effect of NATO and the United Nations on these emerging markets by looking at websites, brochures, and business proposals written by countries that seek entry into the global economy. Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and 101.

ENGL 324. Writing for Careers in Government Credits 3(3-0)
This course examines government documents and web pages. The student will master the theory, principles and ethics in government writing while exploring the social interchanges and cultural contexts out of which government documents are created. Students will turn in portfolios for this course for final evaluation. Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and 101. (F;S;Sum)

ENGL 331. Writing for Science and Technology Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes the study and practice of the basic techniques of writing and editing scientific and technical materials for both the general audience and the specialist. Prerequisite: ECT 101. (The prerequisite applies to students who are Technical Writing Concentration majors within the English department. All other students may take ENGL 331 without a prerequisite. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 411. Visual Rhetoric for Technical and Scientific Writer Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an introduction to the theory and techniques used by scientific and technical communicators. It covers elements of layout, design, and typography, giving students practice with short and long print texts and non-print texts and non-print media. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 412. Writing Reports and Proposals Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an intensive study of the principles and processes involved in preparing technical and scientific reports and proposals. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 413. Feature Writing and Editing for Technical Journals, Magazines and Trade Publications Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides theory and practice in writing and marketing articles for scientific publications with students submitting articles to commercial and scientific publications. This course also examines principles and practice of editors of scientific and technical publications. Students edit other students’ works and that of outside clients. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 414. Designing and Testing User Documents for Scientific and Technical Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an advanced study of theories and practices associated with the production of user documents, instructional manuals and other media. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 415. Practicum for Technical and Scientific Communicators Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to give students practical writing experience related to scientific and technical fields. Offered as an on-campus and off-campus-directed internship, the experience teaches students the importance of client relationships, problem-solving skills, and professionalism in conduct and product. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 432. Writing for Health Professions Credit 3(3-0)
This course will consider specific forms of written and oral communications in the health professions, particularly in working with the NC A&T Department of Nursing. As an introductory writing course promoting effective communication skills, the course will ultimately contribute to the protection of the health and welfare of the public. (F;S;SS)

ENGL 434. Writing Case Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course offers an intensive study of the principles and processes involved in writing case studies and histories. The focus will center around medical case studies and case studies dealing with engineering projects. The course is designed for both technical writing students and those in other fields such as nursing, engineering, and the sciences. (F;S;SS)

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Anjail R. Ahmad
Associate Professor
B.A., Agnes Scott College; M. A., New York University; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Jason DePolo
Assistant Professor
B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Claudia Drieling
Assistant Professor
B.A., Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel; M.A., Federal Institute of Higher Education, Stuttgart; Ph.D., Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel and Indiana University

Michael Greene
Professor
B.A., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University

Letitia Guran
Lecturer
B.A., University of Bucharest (Romania); M.A., University of Richmond; Ph.D., University of Georgia

Kimberly Harper
Assistant Professor
B.A. North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., East Carolina University

Marlene Hendricks
Lecturer
B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University

Moussa Issifou
Lecturer
B.A., M.A., Universite du Benin; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Hope Jackson
Lecturer
B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Adri-Anne Jones
Lecturer
B.A., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Elon Kulii
Professor
B.A., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Indiana University

Veloisa Marsh
Lecturer
B.A.; Spelman College; M.A., University of Memphis

Gregory D. Meyerson
Associate Professor
B. A., Miami University of Ohio; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University

Valerie Nieman
Professor and Interim Chairperson
B.S., West Virginia University; M.F.A., Queens University of Charlotte

Jeffrey D. Parker
Associate Professor
B.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina

Kevin Rippin
Lecturer
B.A, M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh

Robert Randolph
Lecturer and Director of University Writing Center
B.A., University of North Carolina-Greensboro; M.A., North Carolina A&T State University

Myrtle B. Solomon
Lecturer
B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University

Faye Spencer Maor
Associate Professor
B.S., Florida A & M University; M.A., University of Colorado at Boulder; Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Jawanna Southerland-Little
Lecturer
B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Bryon Turman
Lecturer
B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University

Pauline A. Uwakweh
Associate Professor
B.A., University of Port Harcourt; Ph.D., Temple University