Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

http://www.ncat.edu/caes/departments/fcs/index.html

Jane T. Walker, Interim Chairperson

OBJECTIVES

The Department of Family and Consumer Sciences prepares students for professional careers that focus on improving the quality of life of individuals and families in a diverse society. These careers include employment in educational institutions, service institutions, community and government agencies, design and manufacturing industries, and other companies and industries that influence the quality of life. Students are also prepared for graduate school and for medical professional schools.
 
Students in Family and Consumer Sciences are prepared to assist families in meeting their quality nutritional needs, understanding human development, developing skills in family and parent education, managing materials and human resources, and acquiring appropriate and affordable living environments. The Department prepares students to apply new technologies and creative discoveries in each of its program areas to address the needs of a diverse and changing society. The Department also empowers students to think critically, to communicate ideas effectively, and to develop leadership skills in the profession.
 
Faculty in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences conduct research and engage in community activities that contribute to the body of knowledge in the areas of Child Development and Early Education, Food Science, Nutrition, Housing, Fashion Merchandising and Design, and Family Consumer issues. Furthermore, the Department has a commitment to provide continuing professional development for family and consumer sciences professionals that affects the quality of life of individuals, families and communities.

DEGREES OFFERED

Child Development and Family Studies (Child Development and Family Relations) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Child Development and Family Studies (Child Development and Family Studies B-K Licensure) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Family and Consumer Sciences – (Fashion Merchandising and Design) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Family and Consumer Sciences – (Consumer Sciences) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Food and Nutritional Sciences – (Food Science) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Food and Nutritional Sciences – (Human Nutrition) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

MINOR OFFERED

Child Development and Family Studies

CERTIFICATE IN FAMILY FINANCIAL PLANNING

The Family Financial Planning Certificate program is an inter-institutional distance education certificate program created by the 1890 Family and Consumer Sciences - Distance Instructional Alliance (FCS-DIA): North Carolina A&T State University, Alabama A&M University, Fort Valley State University, South Carolina State University, Southern University, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Tennessee State University, and the University of Maryland-Eastern Shore. The program is registered with the Certified Financial Planners Board of Standards and is delivered in accordance with a Memorandum of Agreement signed by each institution. The certificate program is available to students matriculating at North Carolina A&T State University as well as to individuals who hold a bachelor’s degree and are not currently enrolled at the University. The purpose of the certificate program is to prepare students for the CFP® Certification Examination. Each participating 1890 Alliance institution will award a certificate in Family Financial Planning to students who successfully complete the course requirements for the certificate and for a Bachelor’s Degree.

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree programs in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences is based upon the general admission requirements of the University.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

Majors in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences and all of the concentrations must complete the required programs of course work. A minimum grade of “C” is required in all core and program area courses for graduation.

ACCREDITATION

All programs in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences are nationally accredited by the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences.

The Child Development and Family Relations concentration is approved by the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) to offer the Certified Family Life Education program.

THE CHILD DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY

The Child Development Laboratory (CDL) is licensed by the North Carolina Division of Child Development.  It is primarily a teaching, learning, discovery, and servicing laboratory for students and faculty in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences. The CDL is also available for use by students and faculty from other majors across the university that have an interest in child development, child behavior, special education, physical education, speech pathology, foreign language, social work, recreation, sociology, and other areas involving children and families. The CDL provides the opportunity for these students in their respective academic disciplines to make observational, instructional, evaluation, comparative and in-depth studies on child behavior and its related areas. The CDL embraces the “Creative Curriculum” which offers a variety of activities that integrate physical, intellectual, and social-emotional stimulation.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The programs in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences prepare students for, but do not limit them to, the following suggested careers as  community/early childhood center providers, family specialists, child-care directors, sport and corporate wellness nutritionists, private practice, nutrition-related business and industries, nutritionists in hospitals and other health care facilities, researchers in universities and medical centers, financial planners, apparel designers, visual merchandisers, retail buyers, managers, sketch artists, product development specialists, global sourcing managers, food production management specialists, quality assurance specialists, technical sales, food inspection specialists, and researchers for federal, state, and local government.

Child Development and Family Studies Relations students are required to select a cognate area, which is designed to allow the student to specialize in a major-related discipline. All students are required to complete 9 hours of coursework in one of the following disciplines, or select from either area to create a multidisciplinary focus. The multidisciplinary focus can be selected only with the approval of the academic advisor or Department Chairperson.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

AGRI 499. Undergraduate Research Credit 3(0-6)
Research under the direction of faculty in the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences. The research may be carried out on campus or in an off-campus industry or business setting. Limited to majors with 3.0 overall GPA. Requires written paper and oral presentation. (F;S)

FCS 104. The Individual and His Family in Contemporary Society Credit 1(1-0)
This course focuses on individual development in the family, the changing needs and roles of individuals due to emerging social forces, and the role of the Family and Consumer Sciences professional in developing strategies for successful families. (DEMAND) 

FCS 133. Family Foods Credit 3(2-2)
This course is study of the application of elementary principles of nutrition and cookery to the planning, preparation and serving of simple meals designed to meet the needs of all family members. (S)

FCS 135. Food and Man’s Survival Credit 3(3-0)
This course acquaints students with the most common information regarding foods, nutrition and health, with attempts to dispel misconceptions about food properties and factors affecting the quality of foods. Areas of discussion include man’s struggle for foods; chemical additives and food safety; modern food preservation; organic and health foods; and nutrition and the consumer. (F;S;SS)

FCS 150. Food Preparation/Meal Management Credit 2(2-0)
This is an introductory foods course that includes basic principles, techniques and management used in food preparation and preservation, which develop skills in planning, preparing and serving nutritious meals for families of various lifestyles. Prerequisites: Major, permission of instructor. (F;S;SS)

FCS 151. Food Preparation/Meal Management Lab Credit 1(0-2)
This course is an introductory course in the planning, selection, preparation, serving, and preservation of nutritious meals to accommodate various food intake needs. Prerequisites: Major or permission of instructor. (F;S;SS)

FCS 155. Food for Weight Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course acquaints students with a basic understanding of good nutrition and safe weight loss techniques. (DEMAND)

FCS 157. Introduction to Human Nutrition Credit 3(3-0)
The course acquaints students with the most common information regarding foods, nutrition and health, with a basic understanding of the biochemistry of nutrients.  The synergy of foods, nutrients and physiology is emphasized with a focus on chronic disease prevention. (F;S;SS)

FCS 160. Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 2(2-0)
This course is designed to assist students in making personal adjustments to college living; it provides an introduction to the broad areas of family and consumer sciences and a study of the curricula and professional opportunities in the field. (F;S)

FCS 180. Introduction to Fashion Merchandising Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to apparel business including discussions of current trends in fashion merchandising, fashion coordination and analysis of the function of fashion merchandising. (F)

FCS 181. Social-Psychological Aspects of Dress Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a basic study of the social, psychological, cultural and economic influences on contemporary fashions. (S)

FCS 183. Textiles Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an introduction to the study of textiles, including their sources, characteristics and production; the selection of fabrics for end-uses based on serviceability, performance, and care requirements is also discussed. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (F;S;SS)

FCS 221. Exploring Professional Careers in CDFS (formerly FCS 201) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide an overview of career options in the child development, early education, and family studies field using a study tour format. Students will be provided the opportunity to visit multiple settings and interact with diverse personnel in the field. (F;S;SS)

FCS 245. Introduction to Food Science Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an introductory study of the nature of raw foods and behavior of food components during handling and processing. Key methods and principles of food preservation will also be discussed. (F)

FCS 246. Purchasing in Food Service Credit 3(3-0)
A study of problems involved in the purchase of food, equipment and other expendable supplies for food service establishments are the major topics of this course. Prerequisites: FCS 150 and AGEC 446. (S)

FCS 257. Obesity and Weight Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course will examine the multifactorial aspects of obesity, weight maintenance, and the relationship of weight status to chronic disease prevention. The prevalence and basic causes of caloric imbalance, along with a wide variety of approaches to weight control and energy balance will be discussed. (F;S;SS)

FCS 260. Introduction to Human Development Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to the human development process covering the life span from prenatal, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging through death. The social, psychological, cognitive, physical and moral characteristics of each stage are studied. (F;S;SS)

FCS 281. Apparel Construction and Evaluation I Credit 3(1-3)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of apparel construction using a commercial pattern with emphasis on fitting, pattern adjustments, and garment construction methods. This course will focus on laboratory experiences. (F;S;SS)

FCS 282. Apparel Construction and Evaluation II Credit 3(1-3)
This course is a continuation of FCS 281 focusing on advanced apparel construction methods, fitting and alteration techniques, and product quality evaluations. Laboratory experience is required. Prerequisites: FCS 183, FCS 281. (F;S;SS)

FCS 300. Program Planning in Family and Consumer Sciences K-12 Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves participation in planning Family & Consumer Sciences programs for occupational education in public schools K-12. (Career awareness, middle school, exploratory, comprehensive occupational family and consumer sciences, youth and adult program). (DEMAND)

FCS 303. Basic Interior Design (formerly FCS 503) Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a study of housing and interior requirements for individuals and families with a focus on plans, design, furnishing and aesthetic. (DEMAND)

FCS 304. Cooperative Extension (formerly FCS 606) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to the organization, philosophy, financing, personnel, clientele and programs of Cooperative Extension Service. (DEMAND)

FCS 305. Residential Management Principles and Technology (formerly FCS 505) Credit 3(1-4)
In this course students will examine the application of management principles involved in the selection, care and use of technology and equipment in the home and the infrastructure that supports it. (F;S;SS)

FCS 314. Human Ecology of the Family Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of the family as environment and within environment. Relations of values, goals, standards and decision-making in the management of the family. The unique role of the family in the social, economics, and political system. Prerequisite: SOCI 100. (DEMAND)

FCS 316. Financial Planning for Families (formerly FCS 577) Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces students to the various financial planning topics that face families such as the financial planning process, client/planner interactions, time value of money applications, personal financial statements, cash flow and debt management, asset acquisition, and education planning. Risk management, investment planning, retirement planning, plan integration, and ethics are also discussed. (F;S;SS)

FCS 317. Insurance Planning for Families (formerly FCS 578) Credit 3(3-0) This course introduces students to risk management and insurance decisions in family financial planning. Topics include insurance for life, health, disability, property and liability risks, as well as annuities, group insurance, and long term care. (F;S;SS)

FCS 318. Income Tax Planning for Families (formerly FCS 579) Credit 3(3-0) This course is an overview of current tax laws, income tax principles, and taxation terminology. It focuses on tax planning considerations, computations, and tax planning strategies including tax pitfalls that impact families’ financial planning. (F;S;SS)

FCS 319. Investment Planning for Families (formerly FCS 580) Credit 3(3-0) This course provides the student with an understanding of the various types of securities traded in financial markets, investment theory and practice, portfolio construction and management, and investment strategies and tactics to meet a family’s investment goals. (F;S;SS)

FCS 321. Child Development: Prenatal Through Early/Middle Childhood Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a study of the child’s sequential development at different stages - conception through late childhood. Historical and theoretical approaches to child development programs for young children will be studied. Field experiences are required. (F;S)

FCS 322. Adolescence and Young Adulthood Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides a comprehensive study of the physical, mental, and psychological factors of development from late childhood through adulthood. Observation required. Prerequisite: FCS 260. (F;S;SS)

FCS 325. Independent Readings in Child Development and Family Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course permits a student to undertake an in-depth analysis of various problems or issues in child development, early education, family studies, teacher preparation, multiculturalism, and developmental learning principles through individual study. The problem or issue may be selected from the scholarly literature in the field or the professional workplace. (F;S;SS)

FCS 331. Family Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an ecological overview of diverse family structures and functioning styles, including multigenerational challenges facing the contemporary family. A family mentor experience with socioculturally diverse families is required. Prerequisite: FCS 260. (F;S;SS)

FCS 334. Foundations of Early Education and Family Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of the historical, sociological and philosophical background of typical and atypical development in young children. This course also reviews the dynamic of the family and current issues related to the teaching profession. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and applying theories to children and families, the integrated day, and scheduling. Prerequisite: FCS 260. (F;S;SS)

FCS 335. Families as Participants in Diverse Learning Settings Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of parental involvement and interactions in the child's development at home, school, community, and the global society. The effective partnership between parents and school personnel working together for children's developmental readiness and school success will be discussed. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 321, FCS 334. (F;S;SS)

FCS 338. Creative Expression in Early Education Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines pedagogical knowledge, creative strategies, materials and evaluation used in language arts, mathematics, and science. In addition, the utilization of play, stories, computer games, cooking activities, and field-based teaching experiences are included. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 321, FCS 334. (F;S;SS)

FCS 339. Practicum in Interdisciplinary Services (formerly FCS 419) Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes practical field experience in community service agencies concerned with all areas of childcare and family development. Emphasis will be placed on services to young children. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 321. (F;S;SS)

FCS 345. Food Chemistry Credit 3(2-2)
This course is the study of food components, their interactions and reactions with emphasis on biochemical changes in fruits and vegetables on post harvest storage, postmortem biochemical changes in meat and fish, browning reactions, lipid oxidation and other chemical alterations in food. Prerequisites: CHEM 245, CHEM 221, CHEM 223. (F;S;SS)

FCS 346. Food Safety and Sanitation Credit 3(3-0)
This course studies the nature of raw foods and behavior of food components during handling and processing. Key methods and principles of food preservation will also be discussed. Prerequisites: FCS 245, BIOL 220. (F;S;SS)

FCS 347. Food Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of the fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid flow, refrigeration, evaporation and other unit operations in the food processing industry. Application of engineering principles and concepts to the processing of food will also be examined. Prerequisites: PHYS 110, PHYS 111. (F;S;SS)

FCS 349. Food Packaging (formerly FCS 541) Credit 3(3-0)
The characteristics of packaging materials, strength, elasticity, permeability, food packaging machines, adhesives, as related to products wholesomeness and package design as a form of advertising will be studied. Prerequisite: CHEM 106 or 107. (DEMAND)

FCS 350. Food Consultant for Older Adults (formerly FCS 549) Credit 3(3-0)
Techniques of consultation with older adults on diets, food choices, food fads, planning, purchasing and preparation procedures will be examined. Menus for limited incomes will be emphasized. Prerequisites: FCS 150, FCS 151. (DEMAND)

FCS 354. Organizational Management in Food Service Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to study the organizations, management and administration of various food service establishments and the inclusion of personnel management. Prerequisite: FCS 150. (F;S;SS)

FCS 355. Nutrition and Metabolism Credit 3(3-0)
This course will examine human physiology, including the digestion, absorption, transport, metabolism, and function of macronutrients and micronutrients and phytochemicals, with emphasis on their roles in health promotion and disease prevention. Prerequisites: FCS 157 (F;S;SS)

FCS 356. Contemporary Nutrition Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an introductory approach to the principles of nutrition as they relate to human requirements for nutrients during the life cycle; influences of nutrition on growth and development; and the influence of contemporary living as it impacts healthy lifestyle. (F)

FCS 358. Quantity Foods Procurement and Production Credit 4(3-2)
This course focuses on the procurement of food, equipment, and other expendable supplies for food service establishments. It includes the application of principles of cookery to the preparation and service of food for group feeding with emphasis on menu planning, work schedules, cost and portion control. These concepts are applied in a laboratory setting. Prerequisites: FCS 150, FCS 151, FCS 354. (F;S;SS)

FCS 359. Maternal Lifespan Nutrition Credit 3(3-0)
This course emphasizes the energy and nutrient requirements and feeding practices for stages of the life span. The nutritional quality of food, physiological development, growth assessment, dietary evaluation and nutrition assessment for various stages of the lifespan are covered. Prerequisite: FCS 157. (F;S;SS)

FCS 380. Visual Merchandising and Promotion Credit 3(2-2)
This course explores the use of visual merchandising and promotional techniques for textile and non-textile products. Prerequisites: FCS 180, FCS 181, FCS 183, FCS 281, FCS 282. (F;S;SS)

FCS 382. Creative Apparel Design I (Flat Pattern) Credit 3(2-2)
This course examines the application of principles of creative design by the use of flat pattern techniques. Laboratory experience is required. Prerequisites: FCS 180, FCS 181, FCS 183, FCS 281, FCS 282. (F;S;SS)

FCS 384. Historic Developments of Western Costumes and Textiles Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the evolution of dress through the study of western dress from ancient to modern times. Individual research is required. Prerequisites: FCS 180, FCS 181, FCS 183, FCS 281, FCS 282, FCS 382. (F;S;SS)

FCS 385. Creative Apparel Design II (Draping) Credit 3(2-2)
This course will focus on the application of principles of creative apparel design by use of the draping method. Laboratory experience is required. Prerequisites: FCS 180, FCS 181, FCS 183, FCS 281, FCS 282, FCS 382. (F;S;SS)

FCS 398. Food and Nutritional Biochemistry Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introductory course for students in agricultural, animal, food, and nutritional sciences. The course emphasizes the cellular metabolism, structure, and function of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Vitamins, mineral, enzymes, and hormones are covered also. Prerequisites: CHEM 106, 116, 107, 117.

FCS 400. Contemporary Housing Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a study of problems in house planning to meet family needs. Emphasis is placed on the study of house designs, methods of financing and location. (S)

FCS 402. Occupational Family and Consumer Sciences (formerly FCS 500) Credit 3(1-4)
This course examines the organization and administration of occupational wage-earning programs at the upper high school level-methods and instructional media. Work experiences require at least one area of Family and Consumer Sciences occupational cluster. (DEMAND)

FCS 403. Family Finance Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of financial planning and budgeting strategies for individuals and families. Consideration is given to consumer issues such as credit, debt management, insurance, investments, housing, taxes, retirement and estate planning. Prerequisite: None. (F;S;SS)

FCS 404. Cooperative Extension Field Experience (formerly FCS 607) Credit 3(0-6)
The course includes field experience to provide an opportunity for students to become acquainted with the role of country personnel, office organizations and programs in Cooperative Extension Service. (DEMAND)

FCS 406. Retirement Planning for Families (formerly FCS 581) Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides information about public and private retirement plans and examines issues faced by individuals during retirement such as life style choices and medical challenges.(F;S;SS)

FCS 407. Estate Planning for Families (formerly FCS 582) Credit 3(3-0) This course focuses on the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth, consistent with the family’s goals. It is a study of the legal, tax, financial and non-financial aspects of this process, covering topics such as trusts, will, probate, advanced directives, charitable giving, wealth transfers and related taxes. (F;S;SS)

FCS 408. Family Financial Planning Capstone Credit 3(3-0)
This capstone course is designed for students to demonstrate the skills to develop integrated financial plans for clients and communicate their planning recommendations to those clients. Prerequisites: FCS 316, FCS 317, FCS 318, FCS 319, FCS 406, FCS 407. (F;S;SS)

FCS 411. Family and Consumer Sciences Field Experience Credit 3(3-0)
The course includes field experience to provide an opportunity for students to become acquainted with the role of professionals in family and consumer sciences. Junior, Senior Year. (F;S;SS)

FCS 415. Materials, Methods and Evaluation II Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the materials, methods and evaluation used in the development of cognitive, effective, and psychomotor behaviors. Focus areas: Social Studies, Science, Math, Health and Safety. Prerequisite: FCS 414. (DEMAND)

FCS 420. Administration of Early Care & Education Programs Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to business administration, organizations, and supervision in diverse early education and family interagency settings. Emphasis is placed on key administrative and human resources concepts, practices, and issues related to the administrating, planning, organizing, staffing, financing, decision-making, supervising, and evaluating early education and family interagency settings. (S)

FCS 421. Administrative Policies & Resource Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to introduce ethical and legal issues, professional liability, budget policies, and resources management problems faced by managers in early education and family interagency settings. Course content and assignments align with the competency requirements for the North Carolina Early Childhood Center Director, and fulfill partial requirements for the National Council on Family Relations Content Area #9 Professional Ethics and Practice. Prerequisite: FCS 420 or permission of the instructor. (F;S;SS)

FCS 422. Parent Child Relations Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of parental interactions in the children's development at home, in the school and in the community. Students will learn the importance of socializing children as a primary caregiving function of parents and the challenges for contemporary parents and children. Prerequisite: FCS 260, FCS 321. (F;S;SS)

FCS 423. Nutrition and Gardening Education for Young Children Credit 3(3-0)
Students will experience an innovative course delivery of the fundamentals of child development, horticulture and nutrition and how to implement gardening activities and nutritious foods lessons to young children. A hands-on experiential learning component of the course will take place with the preschoolers at the NCA&TSU Child Development Laboratory. Prerequisite: None. (F;S;SS)

FCS 427. Emergent Literacy and Numeracy in Young Children (formerly FCS 534) Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on the study of early literacy in preschool for the diverse learner, while utilizing teaching strategies and learning resources that establish a culturally responsive environment. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 321, FCS 334, SPCH 310. (F;S;SS)

FCS 428. Family Life Education Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on the current issues, trends, and methods in developing, teaching, and evaluating family life education and fulfills partial requirements for the National Council on Family Relations Content Area #10 Methodologies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (F;S;SS)

FCS 429. Community of Practice Internships (formerly FCS 539) Credit 6-9
This course focuses on the current issues, trends, and methods in teaching family life education, and fulfills partial requirements for the National Council on Family Relations Content Area #10 Methodologies. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. (F;S;SS)

FCS 430. Assessment and Evaluation of Young Children Credit 3(3-0)
A study of the principles and practices of observing, recording and analyzing behavior and development of young children. Attention is focused on naturalistic observations, developmental theories, diagnostic information and an analysis of interpreting play, language and physical development of young children. Field experiences are included in this course. Prerequisites: FCS 260, 321, and 334. (F;S;SS)

FCS 431. Emotional and Social Development for Young Children Credit 3(3-0)
This course emphasizes the promotion of nurturing and responsive environments and practices related to the development of self-regulating and social skills for infants, toddlers and young children. Attention is also focused on the implementation of supportive guidance practices of child behaviors and emotions, including the facilitation of social skills. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 321, FCS 430 (corequisite). (F;S;SS)

FCS 432. Cultural Responsive Perspectives for Children and Families Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to develop content knowledge, skills, and dispositions focused on multicultural and anti-bias perspectives in the field of early education and family systems. Critical review of case studies and research emphasizing culturally responsive perspectives will be used as a framework. Prerequisite: None. (F;S;SS)

FCS 433. Professional Development and Leadership in Early Childhood Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides students with an overview of the characteristics, qualities, knowledge, skill, and ethical practices which define an early childhood professional. Applied activities will provide students with the opportunity to interact with professionals in the field. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 321, FCS 334, SPCH 250. (F;S;SS)

FCS 434. Applied Field Based Experiences in Early Education Studies Credit (variable)
This course will provide the student with the opportunity to engage in real applied experiences that allow for the student to engage in extensive observation to participation in diverse settings from schools, hospitals, agencies, and the community for a minimum of 20 hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. (F;S;SS)

FCS 435. Applied Principles of Infant and Toddler Curriculum (formerly FCS 535) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to link child development theories, assessments, and culturally responsive practices for infants and toddlers (birth to age three), and their families. An embedded emphasis of health, nutrition, and safety with CPR and First Aid will be included. A field-based experience is required. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 321, FCS 334, FCS 430. (F;S;SS)

FCS 436. Inclusive Environments for Young Children and Families (formerly FCS 536) Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on providing high quality learning environments in interacting with young children and their families in school and home. Emphasis is placed on the developmental assessment and evaluation of young children guided by inclusive curriculum strategies, management standards and practices for an effective learning environment. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 430, FCS 439, SPED 350. (F;S;SS)

FCS 437. Applied Principles of Pre-Kindergarten/Kindergarten Curriculum (formerly FCS 537) Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves the study of instructional methods, materials, and evaluation measures for the development and enhancement of children (aged three to five) in the language/communication, social/emotional, cognitive, physical, and perceptual/motor developmental domains. Simulated teaching and field experiences are required. Prerequisites: FCS 320, FCS 321, FCS 338, FCS 439. (F;S;SS)

FCS 438. Trends Practices in Early Education and Family Studies (formerly FCS 538) Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes a synthesis of selected research for individuals and group study using projects, workshops, and colloquia. The focus is on early education, family studies, special education, developmental learning, assessment and evaluation, leadership development, technological advancements, diversity, and educational partnerships. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. (F;S;SS)

FCS 439. Approaches to Developmental and Culturally Appropriate Curriculum Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides a review of early childhood curricula as it relates to developmental learning patterns and the nature of knowledge, societal forces and interagency services. Special emphasis will be placed on screening and assessment procedures, and formulating objectives and strategies for working with professional team members. Prerequisites: FCS 260, FCS 321, FCS 334, FCS 430. (F;S;SS)

FCS 440. Food Microbiology and Biotechnology Credit 3(3-0)
A survey of selected topics in food microbiology and the impact of biotechnology on food production. The course will cover the metabolic pathways, organisms, genetic tools and processes involved with food production from fermented dairy products, vegetables, fruits and meats. Prerequisites: FCS 245, BIOL 220. (F;S;SS)

FCS 441. Food Product Development Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides experience in the development and testing of new food products. Opportunities are provided for food manufacturing, production, and distribution facility visits. Prerequisites: FCS 347, FCS 345. (F;S;SS)

FCS 442. Sensory Evaluation of Foods Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the color, texture, aroma and flavor of foods by the use of diverse and innovative sensory evaluation methods. Prerequisites: FCS 157, FCS 245, MATH 224. (F;S;SS)

FCS 444. Food Laws Regulations Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers federal and state laws and regulations affecting food production, processing, packaging, marketing, and distribution of food and food products. Prerequisites: FCS 157. (F;S;SS)

FCS 445. Food Preservation Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of current methods of preserving foods - canning, freezing, dehydration, radiation and fermentation. Prerequisite: FCS 245. (F;S;SS)

FCS 446. Special Problems in Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for in depth study of a special topic in family and consumer sciences. Emphasis is placed on individual reading assignments, research, and group discussions. Topics will vary by semester.

FCS 447. Food Analysis (formerly FCS 547) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of fundamental chemicals, physical and sensory aspects of food composition as they relate to physical properties, acceptability and nutritional values of foods. Prerequisites: FCS 245, FCS 345, CHEM 221, CHEM 223. (F;S;SS)

FCS 451. Nutrition and Prevention of Chronic Diseases Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the importance of diet modification in the management of nutrition related diseases and the interactions of diet, genetics and health. Prerequisites: Senior Standing. (F;S;SS)

FCS 452. Medical Nutritional Therapy I Credit 4(4-0)
This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills for assessment of the nutritional status of individuals. Students will develop nutrient based care plans for persons with various disease conditions. Prerequisites: FCS 457, CHEM 251, CHEM 252. (F;S;SS)

FCS 453. Medical Nutritional Therapy II Credit 4(4-0)
This course is a study of the principles of nutritional sciences in the treatment and management of nutrition related diseases. Course content includes etiology, prevalence, pathophysiology, biochemical clinical and nutritional needs and diet modification in the treatment of diseases. Prerequisite: FCS 452. (F;S;SS)

FCS 455. Cultural Aspects of Food Credit 2(2-0)
A study of the influence of cultural and socioeconomic factors on food patterns and nutritional status of selected ethnic groups. Prerequisite: FCS 157. (F;S;SS)

FCS 456. Nutrition Education Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the philosophy, principles, methods and materials involved in nutrition education. The application of nutrition knowledge and skills in the development of the nutrition education curriculum and programs in schools and communities are implemented. Prerequisites: FCS 150, FCS 151, FCS 157. (F;S;SS)

FCS 457. Advanced Nutrition Credit 3(3-0)
Intermediate metabolism and interrelationships of organic and inorganic food nutrients in human biochemical functions will be studied. Prerequisites: FCS 157, CHEM 221, CHEM 223, CHEM 251, CHEM 252. (F;S;SS)

FCS 458. Community Nutrition Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an introduction and review of materials, methods and goals in planning, assessing, organizing and marketing nutrition for health promotion and prevention of disease. Evaluation of food and nutrition programs at state and federal levels will be conducted. Prerequisite: FCS 456. (F;S;SS)

FCS 459. ProfessionalActivity in Dietetics Credit 3(3-0)
The student participates in a temporary period of supervised work experience, which provides an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a work situation. The internship is designed to give students supervised work experience in Food Administration, Nutrition/Dietetics and Food Science. Prerequisite: Senior Standing (with at least 20 hours in field of Dietetics). (F;S;SS)

FCS 460. Applied Research in Family & Consumer Sciences Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide students with a "hands-on" inquiry experience in the acquisition of knowledge and skills in the research and evaluation process. Students will participate in applied research activities preparatory for conducting a research project. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Year. (F;S)

FCS 461. Integrative Approaches to Family and Consumer Sciences (formerly FCS 560) Credit 3(3-0)
This course will emphasize the basic unifying concepts of family and consumer sciences used to assist in the resolution of social, political, economical and ethical issues currently affecting individuals, families and communities. A service learning field experience is required. Prerequisite: Junior, Senior year. (F;S;SS)

FCS 480. Computer Assisted Design for Apparel Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an introduction to the use of the computer for sketching, pattern making, pattern grading and making markers. Laboratory experience is required. Prerequisites: FCS 180, FCS 181, FCS 183, FCS 281, FCS 282, FSC 382. (F;S;SS)

FCS 481. Merchandising Math Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an integrated presentation of merchandising principles, mathematical formulas and real world applications to enable students to understand the concepts of financial management for the merchandising of fashion products. Prerequisites: FCS 180, ACCT 210 (formerly ACCT 203), and Junior Standing. (F;S;SS)

FCS 482. Global Trends and National Perspectives in the Softgoods Chain Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an in-depth investigation of global and national trends as they relate specifically to the softgoods industry. Prerequisites: FCS 180, FCS 181, FCS 183 and senior standing. (F;S;SS)

FCS 483. Apparel Product Development and Evaluation Credit 3(3-0)
This course requires students to apply knowledge from previous courses to design a line of apparel products for specified target markets. Students will learn to use product development processes to design products, analyze patterns, develop full production specifications, and evaluate final product quality. Prerequisites: FCS 180, FCS 181, FCS 183, FCS 281, FCS 282, FCS 382. (F;S;SS)

FCS 484. Fashion Marketing and Merchandising (formerly FCS 485) Credit 3(3-0)
This course emphasizes the functions and responsibilities of the fashion merchandiser, and considers various retail establishments. A synthesis of business knowledge and its application to the fashion field will be included. Prerequisites: FCS 180, FCS 181, FCS 380. (F;S;SS)

FCS 486. Cooperative Training in Business and Industry I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide pre-professional experiences for students majoring in fashion merchandising and design. Emphasis will be placed on career exploration, resume writing, business correspondence, and internship preparation. Prerequisites: Junior Standing, 15 – 18 hours in Fashion M & D courses, and permission of instructor. (F;S;SS)

FCS 487. Cooperative Training in Business and Industry II Credit 3(3-0)
This course allows students to have a temporary supervised work experience applying theoretical knowledge to a work situation in some aspect of the softgoods industry. Prerequisites: FCS 486 and senior standing. (F;S;SS)

FCS 492. Applied Food Science Seminar (formerly 546) Credit 1(1-0)
A review and discussion of selected topics and recent advances in the fields of animal and food science are emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 224, Senior standing. (F;S;SS)

FCS 498. Internship in Food & Nutritional Sciences Credit 3(3-0)
Students will participate in supervised work experiences, which provides an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a work situation. The internship is designed to give students supervised work experience in nutrition and food science. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;SS)

FCS 512. Methods of Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the methods and techniques necessary for teaching family and consumer sciences on the secondary level. Prerequisite: Formal admission to Teacher Education Program. (F;S;SS)

FCS 548. Food Commodity Processing Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers characteristics of raw food material, applying principles of food preservation and food processing techniques, packaging materials and methods, sanitation and water and management. Prerequisites: FCS 245, FCS 543, FCS 545. (S)

FCS 550. Administrative Policies and Resources Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to introduce ethical and legal issues, professional liability, budget policies, and resources management problems faced  by managers in early education and family interagency settings. Prerequisite: FCS 420. (F)

FCS 603. Special Problems in Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 3(1-4)
Problems in the various areas of Family & Consumer Sciences may be chosen for individual study. (DEMAND)

FCS 604. Seminar in Family and Consumer Sciences Education Credit 3(3-0)
Consideration of problems resulting from the impact of social change in the various fields of Human Environment and Family Sciences, and the review of research and professional development will be included in this course. (S)

FCS 605. Family and Consumer Sciences Study Abroad Credit 6(0-12)
This is a course designed to provide opportunity for students and specialists to study historic and contemporary points of interest abroad. Exposure to customs, cultures and industries in an international setting will provide the basis for broader background and experiences in selected areas of human environment and family sciences. (DEMAND)

FCS 608. Teaching Adult and Youth in Out-of-School Groups Credit 3(0-6)
The design and development of informal educational programs for youth and adults in out-of-school settings. Prerequisite: FCS 606. (DEMAND)

FCS 611. Child Development: Prenatal to Middle Childhood Credit 3(3-0)
This course will focus on the advanced study of the child's cognitive, social-emotional, linguistic, physical, and adaptive development through an analysis of theory and research. A sociocultural framework will be used in this study of child development. (F;S)

FCS 613. Substance Abuse Credit 3(3-0)
Alcoholism and drugs, as well as their inherent effects upon the family and society will be examined. Problems in the family, related to the individuals, business and industry. Additional focus will be given to treatment, agencies and methods of recovering self-esteem. (SS)

FCS 618. Food Technology Seminar Credit 1(1-0)
A review and discussion of selected topics and recent advances in the field of animal and food science are emphasized. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

FCS 629. Applied Principles of Infant/Toddler Curriculum Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to link child development theories, assessment, and classroom practices for infant, toddlers, and young children, birth to age three, and their families. A major emphasis of this course is to prepare students to plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally, individually, and culturally appropriate child care practices, teaching strategies and learning environments for infants, toddlers, and young children with and without disabilities. Students will apply content knowledge, skills, and dispositions in the field-based experience. Prerequisites: FCS 600. (F;S)

FCS 635. Introduction to Research Methods in Food and Nutrition Credit 3(0-6)
This course provides laboratory experiences in the use of methods applicable to food and nutrition research. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

FCS 637. Special Problems in Food and Nutrition Credit 3(0-6)
This course provides independent study/research in the areas of Food and Nutrition or Food Science. Prerequisites: Junior, senior, graduate standing, and consent of instructor. (S)

FCS 639. Applied Principles of Preschool/Kindergarten Curriculum Credit 3(2-2)
This course involves the study of basic principles, materials, and evaluation measures underlying acting leading experiences in improving children’s intellectual styles and social relations. Special attention is given to goals and objectives, daily routine, teacher-made materials, questioning techniques and ideas for small and large group activities. Simulated teaching experiences are required. Prerequisites: FCS 310, 311, 414, and 600. (F)

FCS 640. Geriatric Nutrition Credit 3(3-0)
Multi-disciplinary approaches to geriatric foods, nutrition and health problems. Evaluation of nutritional status and nutrition care of the elderly is emphasized. Field experiences: nursing home and other community agencies. Prerequisite: FCS 157. (DEMAND)

FCS 641. Food Protection and Defense Credit 4(4-0)
This course covers foundational and advanced concepts and policies related to protecting the food supply from intentional contamination. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. (F;S;SS)

FCS 645. Risk Assessment in the Food Industry Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of the quantitative impact of foodborne pathogens and chemical contaminants on food and nutrition, the evaluation procedures to determine the effects of contaminants. Prerequisite: FCS 641. (F;S;SS)

FCS 650. International Nutrition Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of an ecological approach to the hunger and malnutrition in technologically developed and developing countries. Focus is on integrated intervention programs, projects, and problems. Opportunities to participate in national and international internships through cooperative arrangements are available. (DEMAND)

FCS 655. Observation and Student Teaching in Early Education and Family Studies (B-12) Credit 9(1-16)
The application and practice of methods, techniques, and materials of instruction in a real classroom situation under supervision will be studied. The course includes teaching purposeful observation, organizing teaching materials, participation in other activities, and parent-teacher association activities. See University Student Teaching Handbook for specific requirements. (DEMAND)

FCS 659. Fundamentals of Emergent Literacy Credit 3(3-0)
This course explores current research, theory, strategies and resources that enable students to acquire theoretical and practical knowledge to design research-based literacy activities and environments. Topics explored include: the social content of literacy learning; stages of language and literacy development; role of families in supporting literacy development; cultural and linguistic similarities and differences; English language learners; performance-based assessments; and adaptations for children with special needs. Prerequisites: FCS 611, SPED 600, CUIN 619. (F;S)

FCS 664. Occupational Exploration in Middle Grades Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed for persons who teach or plan to teach middle grades occupational exploration in the curriculum. Sources and uses of occupational information, approaches to middle school teaching, and philosophy and concepts will be taught in cooperation with the Department of Business Education and Administrative Services, Family and Consumer Sciences and Industrial Education. (DEMAND)

FCS 665. Occupational Exploration in the Middle Grade Family and Consumer Sciences Credit 3(3-0)
Emphasis is placed on curriculum, methods and techniques of teaching and resources and facilities for teaching in the service occupations cluster which involves the areas of consumer and family sciences education, personal service, public service, hospitality and recreation and health occupations. (DEMAND)

FCS 681. Curriculum Instructional Planning and Assessment Credit 3(3-0)
This course addresses the need for planning programs in education. The course covers teaching objectives, curriculum models, evaluation of family and consumer sciences programs, use of advisory groups, organizations, and use of resources and facilities. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor. (F;S)

FCS 682. Advanced Interior Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course will address the current aspects of interior design. Topics to be covered include certification laws, fire-safety and abrasions resistance requirements for furniture and fabrics, accommodations for universal access, and issues of environmentalism. Stylistically, the course will address neoornamentalism, post modernism, and deconstructionism. Additionally. students will be made aware of new composite materials, acoustic controls, and lighting types. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor. (F;S)
 
FCS 683. Consumer Behavior in Fashion Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of how the consumer's world is influenced by the actions of fashion marketers and how fashion marketers are influenced by consumers. Marketing and consumer behavior theories and concepts as they apply to fashion will be discussed. Results of research studies will be used to illustrate marketing and consumer behavior theories and concepts. Students will gain an understanding of how fashion shapes the everyday world of consumers. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. (F;S)

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Lynda Brown
Associate Professor 
B.S., The College of William and Mary; Ph.D., University of Maryland at College Park

Guibing Chen
Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., Dalian University of Technology; Ph.D., Perdue University

Heather L. Colleran
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of North Carolina at Wilmington; M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Devona L. Dixon
Assistant Professor
B.S., Southern A&M University; M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University

Valerie L. Giddings
Associate Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Research
B.S., Bennett College; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Thurman Guy
Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ed.D., University of North Dakota

Sherrell House
Associate Professor
B.S., Howard University; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Michigan State University

Salam A. Ibrahim
Professor
B.S., University of Mosul; M.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Kentucky

Hye Won Kang
Research Assistant Professor
B.S., Dongduk Women’s University; M.S., Korea University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut

Sung-Jin Lee
Research Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., Chungnam National University; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Valerie J. McMillan
Associate Professor
B.S., M.Ed., South Carolina State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University

Elizabeth Newcomb Hopfer
Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. North Carolina State University

Shengmin Sang
Associate Professor
B.S., Shandong Normal University; Ph.D., Shanghgi Institute of Material Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Reza Tahergorabi
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of Sistan and Baluchestan; M.S., Azad University; Ph.D., West Virginia University

Jane T. Walker
Professor and Interim Department Chairperson
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Leonard Williams
Professor and Director of the Center for Post Harvest Technologies
B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; MBA., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., Alabama A&M University

Meeshay Williams-Wheeler
Associate Professor
B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro