Center for Academic Excellence

http://www.ncat.edu/divisions/academic-affairs/cae/

Regina Williams Davis, Assistant Provost for Student Success and Academic Support

The Center for Academic Excellence (CAE) is a  full-service learning support unit designed to assist all university students in reaching high levels of academic success. The CAE mission is to equip students with success skills and learning support by helping them to: chart efficient learning paths, achieve their academic goals and become productive citizens and global contributors to society. The primary goal of CAE is to increase the retention of all freshmen, sophomores and student athletes by providing quality academic support programs and intrusive advising. The services provided by the Center for Academic Excellence include: academic coaching and walk-in advising services, freshman seminar College Success Course (FRST 101), tutorial services (group & individual appointments), supplemental instruction (structured learning assistance), early alert campaign outreach (academic progress reporting), “Aggies Help” online help request and mentoring programs. The Academic Coaches are instructors for the College Success Course and serve as leaders and organizers for academic skills workshops, mentoring programs for two living learning communities, and retention initiatives for special populations of students.

Objectives

The objectives of the Center for Academic Excellence are:

  • To serve as the university’s central academic advising unit that provides academic guidance and support services for tutoring, supplemental instruction, developmental mathematics courses and instructors for the College Success Course.
  • To collaborate with academic and student affairs departments to provide a cohesive network of support services aimed to increase student academic achievement.
  • To develop and implement strategies designed to increase retention rates of all freshmen and sophomores.

Goals

The goals of the Center for Academic Excellence are:

  1. To increase the retention and graduation of students admitted to the University;
  2. To provide intensive quality academic advising and academic support services that foster academic success;
  3. To assist students in their transition to the university;
  4. To prepare undeclared students for their prospective majors;
  5. To provide students on academic probation a support network that will assist them in obtaining good academic standing;
  6. To enhance students’ mathematics skills.

Courses with Descriptions

FRST 100. University Survival Credit 1 This course is intended to introduce students to academic and personal skills essential for success in college and in life. The course focuses on fundamental principles of study skills such as reading and study strategies, note-taking practices, and test-taking as well as general academic skills such as goal setting, time-management, and critical thinking. This course is also designed to orient students to university life and provide information regarding university organizational structures, as well as policies and procedures, all with the aim of encouraging them to utilize these resources to attain their academic goals.

FRST 101. College Success Credit 1 This course is intended to provide academic and personal skills and resources essential for success in college and in life. Students will gain knowledge and experiences to guide them through the major/career decision making process based on ability and aptitude. Students will gain necessary information to build financial aid and financial literacy awareness and receive tools for financial and debt management. Additionally, health and wellness topics will be addressed to promote and identify prevention strategies for healthy living and student success.

MATH 099. Intermediate Mathematics Credit 3 This course provides elementary properties of real numbers and basic algebra through solving of quadratic equations by various means. Students are assigned to this course based on their math placement exam score. Students whose major curriculum includes Math 101 or Math 111 are also required to take this course.

Credit

Credit is given for math courses taken in The Center for Academic Excellence, however, no quality points are received toward the completion of a degree.

Directory of Faculty

Ahmed Ahmed, B.S., University of Khartoum; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Katrina Allen-Norris, B.S., James Madison University; M.Ed., National-Louis University

Amy Anderson, B.A., Mercer University; M.Ed., Georgia Southern University; Ed.S., University of Georgia

Anjan Basu, B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University

Torrey Burden, B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.S., Kellogg Institute (ASU); Ed.S., Appalachian State University

Kimberly Burke, B.S., State University of New York at Geneseo; M.A., Nazareth College of Rochester

Antja Caldwell, B.A., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Lorraine W Cook, B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Daniel Ferguson, B.S., South Carolina State University; M.Ed., Clemson University

Andrea Fernandez, B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Tanisha George, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Maurice D. Gregory, B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Ella Hairston, B.A., Johnson C. Smith University; M.A., North Carolina A&T State University

Tonia Hamilton, B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

W. Grant Hill, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.B.A., Winston Salem State University

Renisha Howard, B.A., M.P.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Wilson Jones, B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.S., Kellogg Institute (ASU); Ed.S., Appalachian State University

Melinda Lee, B.S., Elizabeth City State University; M.S., American InterContinental University; Ph.D., Capella University

Michael Murphy, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Dawn Nail, B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Austin Peay State University; Ed.D., Capella University

Juanita Painter, B.S., M.A., Norfolk State University

Leslie Rowls, B.S., University of West Alabama; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Constance Williams, B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Deborah Williamson, B.A., M.Ed., North Carolina A&T State University

Regina Williams Davis, B.S., Hampton University; M.H.R., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro