Department of Built Environment

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/sot/cm/index.html

Robert B. Pyle, Chairperson

OBJECTIVES

The Department of Built Environment (formerly the Department of Construction Management and Safety) prepares men and women in the scientific, managerial, and supervisory areas required in the programs of Construction Management, Environmental Health and Safety and Geomatics.

The program in Construction Management (CM) emphasizes all areas of construction from the viewpoint of the contractor/constructor. This includes all aspects of construction from planning and operations to materials and structures.

The program in Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) is concerned with the anticipation, recognition, evaluation and control of occupational safety and health hazards associated with mechanical systems, material handling, electrical systems, chemical processes, and illustrates controls through engineering revision, safeguarding and personal protective equipment.

The program in Geomatics is attuned to the unique abilities needed by students that will prepare them to work productively in the area of Geomatics contributing to the welfare, quality of life, protection, and advancement of the community.

DEGREES OFFERED

Construction Management – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Environmental Health and Safety – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Geomatics – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

MINORS OFFERED

Construction Management
Geomatics

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree program in the Department of Built Environment is based upon the general admission requirements of the University.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

Students who desire to matriculate in the Department of Built Environment must have a strong background in math, science and communication. Computer skills are also recommended. All majors in the department are expected to maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0. A minimum grade of “C” must be earned in all major courses.

Any student transferring to the Department of Built Environment from other disciplines within the University must have a minimum of 2.5.

Students majoring in Construction Management, Environmental Health and Safety and Geomatics must complete a minimum of 120 credit hours to meet program degree requirements.

ACCREDITATION

The degree programs in Construction Management and Environmental Health and Safety are accredited by the Association of Technology, Management and Applied Engineering (ATMAE). The Construction Management degree program is also accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE).

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Graduates of our Construction Management, Environmental Health and Safety and Geomatics programs are very successful in gaining employment in industry, government, and business as supervisors, managers, engineers, technical salespersons and researchers.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

CM 100.  Introduction to Construction Management Credit 3(2-2)
This course will give students an introduction to historical perspectives of the construction industry. Emphasis is placed on computer applications, career opportunities, types of processes, specifications and related technology. (F;S;S)

CM 150.  Construction Documents Credit 3(2-3)
This course deals with the analysis and interpretation of construction contract documents. Topics of discussion will include evaluation of different types of written contracts, architectural working drawings, shop drawings, general conditions, specifications, supplementary general conditions, bid proposal, addenda, and agreements. Special emphasis will be placed on case studies involving a variety of contracts. Also, computer applications in construction documents will be examined. Prerequisite: CM 100. (F;S;S)

CM 160. Construction Drawings & Specifications Credit 3(2-2)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of construction drawings and specifications. Emphasis will be placed on drawing interpretations, understanding contract specifications, scopes of work and the Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format. Prerequisite: CM 150. (F;S;S)

CM 190. Construction Materials Credit 3(2-2)
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the structure, properties, and application of construction materials and their integration into building systems. The laboratory exercises will focus on construction materials, soils and concrete testing. The structure of the course will follow the format of the Construction Specification Institute (CSI). Prerequisite: CM 100. (F;S;S)

CM 200. Industrial Experience I Credit 1(0-3)
Students must work in industry during one semester or summer (300 work-hours) in their major field and complete Departmental requirements. They will be evaluated on reports from on-site supervisors and the University coordinators. (F;S;S)

CM 210. Principles of Structures Credit 3(2-2)
This course will focus on analysis and evaluation of structural elements and systems and their integration into building design. Study of forces, force systems, building structural mechanics, statics, and strength of materials will be included. Prerequisites: PHYS 225/235 and CM 215. (F;S;S)

CM 214. Surveying Credit 2(2-0)
This course provides an introduction to surveying theories, principles, and practices. Topics include horizontal measurements, differential and profile leveling, the concept of errors in measurements and their corrections, directional and angular measurements, traverse computations and adjustments, area and volume computations, horizontal and vertical curves, topographic mapping and construction layout. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or above. (F;S;S)

CM 215. Light Construction Methods and Codes Credit 3(2-2)
The content of this course includes the principles of light frame construction, foundations, framing, exterior finish and related areas of layout, estimating, materials procurement and conventional and modular component systems. Special emphasis will be placed on applicable building codes, ordinances, and blueprint reading. Prerequisite: CM 190. (F;S;S)

CM 216. Construction Methods and Equipment Credit 3(2-2)
This course focuses on the construction methods and equipment currently used in building projects. Special emphasis will be placed on site layouts, foundations, structural systems, exterior and interior finishing. Prerequisite: CM 215. (F;S;S)

CM 224. Surveying Lab Credit 1(0-3)
This laboratory course will emphasize the material presented in CM 214 Surveying. Individual laboratory sessions will cover the areas of distance measurement including taping and pacing, differential and profile leveling and traverse and topographic surveying using a differential level, theodolite, and a total station. Emphasis will be on proper field procedures and documentation. Prerequisite (co-requisite): CM 214; MATH 101 or above. (F;S;S)

CM 233. Construction Estimating I Credit 3(2-2)
This course is designed to enable the student to gain competency in estimating the amount of materials, time, labor and equipment required to complete construction projects. A practical approach is emphasized in the estimating process to simplify preparation of formal estimates. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and CM 216. (F;S;S)

CM 256. Introduction to Building Information Modeling (BIM) Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a study of BIM technology as it is applied to various building types and their respective building systems. Emphasis is placed on research and integration of architectural, structural, MEP, specifications and cost estimating of building systems for decision modeling using BIM. Prerequisites: CM 210 or permission by instructor. (F;S;S)

CM 301. Industrial Experience II Credit 1(1-0)
Continuation of CM 200. Students must work in industry during one semester or summer (300 work-hours) in their major field and complete Departmental requirements. They will be evaluated on reports from on-site supervisors and the University coordinators. Prerequisite: CM 200. (F;S;S)

CM 318. Construction Estimating II Credit 3(2-2)
The focus of this course is on the general concepts of computer applications in construction estimating. Special emphasis will involve the utilization of selected commercial estimating software. A comprehensive estimating project is required for completion of the course. Prerequisite: CM 233. (F;S;S)

CM 320. Construction Safety Credit 3(3-0)
This is a study and evaluation of OSHA standards and regulations as they relate to the construction industry. Safety requirements on various construction operations will be analyzed and discussed. Also, students will learn the principles of safety management, accident prevention and safety program development methods. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (F;S;S)

CM 331. Structural Systems Credit 3(2-2)
This course focuses on advanced structural principles and practices in construction. Topics of discussion will include analysis and design of structural elements and building systems such as walls, floors, footings, foundations and roof truss systems; application of structural theories in the design of timber, steel and reinforced concrete members; and code requirements and specifications. Prerequisite: CM 210. (F;S;S)

CM 333. Construction Inspections and Codes Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the basic principles and practices of professional construction inspection. Methods and techniques of visually inspecting construction work, analysis of contract documents, and applicable codes will be studied. Other topics of discussion will include code and contractual compliance, project monitoring and inspection report procedures. Prerequisite: CM 215. (F;S;S)

CM 394. Construction Planning, Scheduling and Control Credit 3(2-2)
This course will focus on actual planning, scheduling and controlling of construction projects. Students will define specific activities and work tasks, prepare work schedules, measure performance and evaluate options. Students will learn to develop presentations of accurate and timely information by appropriate computer software. Prerequisite: CM 216. (F;S;S)

CM 400. Senior Seminar Credit 1(1-0)
This course is for senior construction majors only. Special emphasis will be placed on preparing preliminary design documents for a building project including cost estimate, scheduling, development drawings, site plan drawings and building processes and review. Students will be required to be on site shadowing or working with project manager. Prerequisites: Senior standing, CM 320, 348. (F;S;S)

CM 401. Senior Capstone Project Credit 3(3-0)
This course prepares students to become project managers by having students develop a final set of descriptive specific construction documents; including production drawings and specifications. The students will review and discuss contracts, ethics, construction administration and management as they relate to the project. Prerequisite. Senior Standing and CM 400. (F;S:S)

CM 412. Environmental Control Systems Credit 3(2-2)
This course covers the basic principles and advanced practices in the selection, installation, operation and maintenance of environmental control systems. Topics include mechanical and electrical equipment for buildings, piping systems, water supply and design; sanitary drainage systems and design, HVAC and cooling systems, electrical and lighting and renewal energy systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F;S;S)

CM 438. Construction Management Credit 3(2-2)
This course covers the fundamental principles and practices of professional construction management. Relationships, duties and responsibilities of all parties involved are emphasized. Administration of complex construction projects including bidding, contracting, financing, organizing, coordinating and cost controlling functions and techniques will be covered. Appropriate contract administration software will be utilized. Prerequisites: CM 394, CM 496. (F;S;S)

CM 448. Foundations Soil and Mechanics Credit 3(2-2)
This course focuses on the engineering properties of soils and how they affect the design of foundations including shallow, pile and drilled shaft foundations as well as retaining structures. Other topics of discussion include slope stability analysis, soil pressure, bearing capacity and soil settlement. Prerequisites: PHYS 225/235 and CM 331. (F;S;S)

CM 450. Construction Contracts and Law Credit 3(3-0)
This course deals with contracts and the law in regard to construction company formation, methods of advertising, bidding process, contract formation and awards. Special emphasis is placed on law pertaining to the construction industry. Extensive case studies are reviewed. Prerequisite: CM 394 or equivalent. Senior Standing. (F;S;S)

CM 460. Principals of Sustainable Development and Construction Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on the principles and practices of sustainable development and construction. Topics to be covered include an overview of the historical development of sustainable movement as it relates to construction practices, an in depth analysis of green building systems, planning, assessment, and implementation. Prerequisites: CM 216, CM 412. (F;S;S)

CM 490. Human Relations in Construction Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides a study of work place issues, which will aid the students in getting along with people on the job, in the community, and the home. The units of work in class will include ethics, rights, obligations, employee/employer responsibilities, and state and federal regulations. (F;S;S)

CM 496. Construction Financial Management and Organization Credit 3(2-3)
This course focuses on the setting-up of a construction firm. Students are made to develop plans for setting-up their own firms by developing business plans and business strategies. They are then given a contract to construct a building project, commercial or residential. Construction estimating and scheduling for the comprehensive project are developed and financial reports of the business are prepared using appropriate software. Prerequisites: ACCT 203, MGMT 425, Senior Standing and CM Major. (F;S;S)

CM 497. Industrial Experience I  Credit 3(0-7)
Students must work in industry during one semester or summer (300 work hours) in their major field and complete departmental requirements. They will be evaluated on reports from on-site supervisors and the University coordinator. (F;S;SS)

CM 498. Industrial Experience II Credit 3(0-7)
Students must work in industry during one semester or summer (300) work hours) in their major field and complete departmental requirements.  They will be evaluated on reports from on-site supervisors and the University Coordinator. (F;S;SS)

CM 570. Environmental Controls, AC and Heating Systems Credit 3(2-2)
This course includes the study of principal equipment, design and load calculations for cooling and heating layouts and controls employed in various types of systems. This course is augmented by a practical design problem. Prerequisite: CM 216. (F;S;S)

CM 571. Commercial Refrigeration, Heating and Ventilation Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a study of steam systems, hot water systems, warm air systems and electrical systems used in heating buildings; load calculation for walk-in coolers, deep freezers and drinking water fountains; and special refrigerating devices and applications. Prerequisites: CM 570. (F;S;S)

CM 590. Heavy Construction Methods Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on the methods and equipment used in the heavy construction industry: highway, airport, AND dam construction. The methods will include haulage system design and analysis; fleet design and equipment scheduling; drilling and blasting; compaction and stabilization; dewatering systems and equipment. In addition, the economics of these methods and equipment will also be discussed. Prerequisites: CM 216, Senior Standing, CM Major or Permission of Instructor. (F;S;S)

CM 592. Project Management Credit 3(3-0)
This is an introductory course in project management principles including the development of project management and organizational skills for technology, engineering and business applications. Other topics include materials management, computer applications and ethical issues relevant to project management. (F;S;S)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN GEOMATICS

GEOM 101. Introduction to Geomatics I Credit 1(1-0)
This course will focus on the students’ transition from high school to college and the skills necessary to be successful at the university level and in the Geomatics program.  Course organization, study skills, time management, and topics relevant to Geomatics will be covered. (F;S;S)

GEOM 102. Introduction to Geomatics II Credit 1(1-0)
This course will focus on the students’ transition from high school to college and the skills necessary to be successful at the university level and in the Geomatics program.  Course organization, study skills, time management, and topics relevant to Geomatics will be covered. (F;S;S)

GEOM 202. Geomatics Sophomore Colloquium Credit 0(0-1)
This colloquium assists students in their preparation for the end-of-year exam required for sophomores in Geomatics. Topics include algebra and trigonometry, higher math, physics, written communication, plane survey calculations, graphical communication and mapping, field data acquisition and reduction, boundary law, and computer operations and programming. Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. (F;S;S)

GEOM 205. Surveying II Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces route surveying and roadway planning and layout. Topics include simple, compound, reverse, spiral, and vertical curves, geometric design and layout of roadways, planning of cross-sections and grade lines, mass diagrams and super elevation calculations. Upon completion, students should be able to calculate and layout highway curves; prepare roadway plans, profiles and sections; and perform slope staking. Prerequisite: CAAE 204. (F;S;S)

GEOM 206. Surveying III Credit 4(2-5)
This course introduces boundary surveying, land partitioning, and calculations of areas. Topics include advanced traverses and adjustments, preparation of survey documents, and other related topics. Prerequisites: CAAE 204. (F;S;S)

GEOM 208. Mathematical Applications in Geomatics Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the mathematical aspects of surveying. Topics include trigonometric applications as related to geomatics, angle, bearing and azimuth computations, traverse adjustments, horizontal, vertical, and spiral curve design, and coordinate geometry. Also covered are taping adjustments, area and volume calculations, and leveling adjustments. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and Permission of Instructor. (F;S;S)

GEOM 210. Cartography Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the evolution of cartography by presenting both traditional and computer based cartographic techniques.  Cartographic methods, design, and basic map reading and interpretation are examined. Professional quality maps that adhere to basic cartographic principles involving projections, graphic design and layout, data symbolization, and mapping theory are produced. Prerequisites: None. (F;S;S)

GEOM 215. Surveying II Lab Credit 1(0-3)
This laboratory course will emphasize the material presented in GEOM 205 Surveying II. Individual laboratories will focus on the proper procedures and computational methods for all aspects of route design projects. Field work will cover the collection of topographic data and the processing of that data, roadway stake-out, and the collection of cross-sectional data. Prerequisites: CM 214; Corequisite: GEOM 205. (F;S;S)

GEOM 271. Land Survey Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces the historical development, description, and basic legal land boundary elements related to the land survey systems in the United States. The United States Public Land Survey System material introduces sectionalized land subdivision, corner restoration, resurveys, evidence, and descriptions. Additional topics will include state plane coordinate systems, deed, plat, and other land boundary-related recording systems, and the historical concept of the cadastre. Prerequisites: CAAE 204, CM 214. (F;S;S)

GEOM 300. Internship Credit 1(0-3)
This course is designed to expose the typical student to the field of surveying in a real world environment. Students will be expected to work a minimum of 5 hours per week in some aspect of surveying which could include, but is not limited to, traditional field surveying, CAD office work, photogrammetry, or remote sensing. Prerequisites: CAAE 204, CM 214. (F;S;S)

GEOM 302. Geomatics Junior Colloquium Credit 0(0-1)
This colloquium assists students in their preparation for the end-of-year exam required for juniors in Geomatics. Topics include algebra and trigonometry, higher math, physics, written communication, plane survey calculations, graphical communication and mapping. Other topics will include field data acquisition and reduction, boundary law, computer operations and programming, probability and statistics, measurement analysis, data adjustment, geodesy, geodetic survey calculations, photogrammetry and remote sensing, and geographic information system concepts. Prerequisites: Junior standing. (F;S;S)

GEOM 307. Automated Surveying and Mapping Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the procedures necessary for data collection and dissemination of field-to-finish projects. Topics covered include the use of hardware and software for surveying and mapping computations and drafting, data storage and output from automated devices used in surveying, and the use of total stations and electronic filed data collection systems. Prerequisite: GEOM 205; Corequisite: GEOM 317. (F;S;S)

GEOM 310. Geographic Information Systems in Geomatics Credit 3(2-2)
This course introduces the capabilities, concepts, applications and issues of a Geographic Information System as it relates to areas within Geomatics. Topics include existing sources of data, metadata and representations in GIS, the relationship of CAD-generated data and its incorporation into a GIS, land information system, generation and use of new data through GPS, static surveys, photogrammetry and remote sensing, spatial and attribute data, spatial data processing, and spatial analysis. Prerequisites: CIEN 280, CAAE 204. (F;S;S)

GEOM 317.  Automated Surveying and Mapping Lab Credit 1(0-3)
This laboratory course will emphasize the material presented in GEOM 307 Automated Surveying and Mapping. Individual laboratories will utilize the latest survey technology for field-to-finish surveys. Technologies will include total stations, Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning Systems (RTK – GPS), data collectors, and current production and design software. Prerequisites: GEOM 205, GEOM 215;  Corequisite: GEOM 307. (F,S,S)

GEOM 320. Introduction to Photogrammetry Credit 3(3-0)
This is an introductory course in metric and interpretive photogrammetry. Topics covered include the fundamental principles of photography and imaging, cameras and other imaging devices, coordinate systems and image measurements, vertical photographs, stereoscopic viewing and parallax, tilted photographs, and the role of planimetric mapping in GIS. Material on interpretive photogrammetry will include land use and cover mapping, color infrared photography, the use of multiple images, and satellite and radar mapping. Prerequisites: CAAE 204 CM 214. (F;S;SS)

GEOM 340. Adjustment Computations I Credit 3(3-0)
This course recognizes the basic tenet that no measurement is ever exact and hence will have an error. The fundamentals of errors and the methods of analyzing them will be examined by evaluating graphical representations of data and numerical methods of data description. Random error theory will be covered by examining simple probability and the normal distribution function followed by statistical testing and confidence intervals. Error propagation in surveying measurements of indirectly measured quantities, traverse surveys, and differential leveling will be examined. Weights of observations will be covered for the various types of survey measurements. Prerequisite: MATH 131, GEOM 205. (F;S;S)

GEOM 341. Adjustment Computations II Credit 3(3-0)
This second course in Adjustment Computations will examine the principles of least squares as it applies to error adjustment. Application of the least squares method to adjusting the basic types of surveys will then be presented. The adjustment of level nets, trilateration, triangulation, traverses and horizontal networks, and GPS networks will be covered. Error ellipses will be covered as well as the application of least squares in computing coordinate transformations. Prerequisite/Corequisite: GEOM 340, MATH 450. (F;S;S)

GEOM 350. Subdivision Design Credit 3(3-0)
General concepts governing land development will be examined including the analysis of soil, topography, geometry, environmental impact, aesthetic and economic principles in land planning. The permitting process at local, state and federal levels will be discussed, as well as the applicable federal, state, and municipal platting regulations. Ethical considerations for land planning will also be discussed. A plat and a subdivision design including appropriate infrastructure will be completed. Prerequisites: GEOM 307 pre- or corequisite: GEOM 367. (F;S;S)

GEOM 360. Geodesy and Map Projections Credit 3(3-0)
This course serves as an introduction to the concepts of astronomy, geodesy and map projections currently used in surveying practice. The earth’s gravity field, ellipsoids, datums, geographic and projected coordinate systems, and coordinate transformations are discussed. Prerequisites: GEOM 340; PHYS 241/251. (F;S;S)

GEOM 366. Hydraulics and Piping Systems Credit 2(1-2)
This course covers the theory of fluid statics, the equations of continuity, momentum, and energy, and pipe friction and head loss. Applications and design of pressurized and open channel flow, network pipe flow, sanitary sewer system design and potable water systems will also be covered. Prerequisites: MATH 131. (F;S;S)

GEOM 367. Hydrology Credit 2(1-2)
This course covers the basic processes in a hydrologic system. Topics covered include precipitation, rainfall- runoff relationships, watersheds, hydrograph development methods, drainage conveyance and control, and storm water routing methods. Prerequisite: GEOM 366. (F;S;S)

GEOM 400. Fundamentals of Land Surveying Review Credit 1(0-2)
This course covers and reviews the geomatics topics included in the Fundamentals of Land Surveying (FLS) exam. The course emphasizes extensive problem solving to prepare the student for the exam. Prerequisite: Senior Standing in Geomatics. (F;S;S)

GEOM 420. Analytical Photogrammetry Credit 3(3-0)
This is an advanced course in photogrammetry that emphasizes the metric aspects of photogrammetry. Topics include analytical photogrammetry, mapping and data collection using stereoscopic plotting equipment, digital imaging and processing, elements of Softcopy photogrammetry, establishment of ground control and project planning, aerotriangulation, terrestrial and close range photogrammetry, and photogrammetric applications in GIS. Prerequisites: GEOM 320, GEOM 341. (F;S;S)

GEOM 460. Satellite Positioning Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers precise point positioning as it applies to surveying using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other satellite positioning systems. Types of GPS equipment, their uses and limitations will be discussed. Mission planning and network design for GPS surveys will be covered as well as baseline processing, network adjustment and data management. Real time kinematic (RTK) GPS will be applied to topographic, boundary, and construction surveys. Prerequisites: GEOM 360, GEOM 341. (F;S;S)

GEOM 470. Boundary and Legal Principles Credit 3(3-0)
This course explores the role of the boundary surveyor in retracement of land boundaries, the methods of boundary establishment, and the classification and analysis of boundary evidence. Additional topics include the laws governing riparian boundaries, easements and right of ways, the preparation of deed descriptions and survey plats, the preservation of survey evidence, the surveyor as an expert witness, and ethics, liability, and professionalism in Geomatics. Prerequisites: GEOM 307. (F;S;S)

GEOM 471. Professionalism and Ethics Credit 1(1-0)
This course will emphasize the basic concepts of professionalism and ethics as they apply to Geomatics. Students will learn methods of dealing with various situations both legally and ethically as the surveying and engineering profession requires. Through the use of open ended projects, the students will gain experience in working through actual problems. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;S)

GEOM 474. Real Estate Law Credit 3(3-0)
This course will examine real estate law as it involves the surveyor. Topics include the economic, social, financial, and legal problems involved in acquiring, holding, and disposing of real estate. Property rights and liabilities, real estate instruments, estates, leases, and liens will be covered. Prerequisites: GEOM 470. (F;S;S)

GEOM 496. Senior Project I Credit 1(0-2)
This is the first capstone design course in Geomatics. The objective is to begin the team solution of a practical and comprehensive Geomatics design project. Real world parameters including local, state and national law and codes, ordinances, and relevant surveying practices are emphasized. Professional quality team presentation of Geomatics projects using modern presentation tools/software is required. A final report and presentation are required. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;S)

GEOM 499.  Senior Project II Credit 4(4-0)
This is the second capstone design course in Geomatics and will emphasize a team solution of a practical and comprehensive Geomatics’ project that incorporates data collection, analysis, and design. A comprehensive final report with professional quality drawings and a formal presentation to a panel of faculty and local professionals are required. (F;S;S)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY

EHS 101. Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to the standards of the Environmental Health and Safety Administration, and the job roles of the safety professional and the industrial hygienist. Course material shall include an introduction to quantitative problem solving and units of measure. An emphasis will be placed on the description of workplace environments. (F;S;S)

ESH 205. Sprinklers and Auto Alarms Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces various types of automatic sprinklers, standpipes and fire alarm systems. Topics include wet or dry systems, testing and maintenance, water supply requirements, fire detection and alarm systems and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of various sprinkler and alarm systems and required inspection and maintenance. (F;S;S)

ESH 210. Industrial Accident Prevention Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of accident prevention. An emphasis is placed on educational and training methods; the identification and elimination of physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and fall hazards; and consumer product safety. (F;S;S)

ESH 212. Accident Investigation Analysis and Records Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of accident investigation including the importance, use, scope, and requirements of accident investigation. An emphasis is placed on casual analysis and the people, position, parts, and paper relevant to accident investigation. Topics of discussion also include record-keeping and reporting requirements of federal, state, and local agency standards. Prerequisite: OSH 201. (F;S;S)

ESH 214. Principles of Fire Prevention Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an introduction to the principles of fire prevention and fire theory. An emphasis is placed on the Life Safety Code of the National Fire Protection Agency and pertinent standards from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Prerequisites: CHEM 107 or equivalent, and OSH 312. (F;S;S)

ESH 220. Safety and Security Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides students with the technical know how to effectively communicate after the September 11, 2001 disaster and their need to manage, ensure and receive the necessary resources for organizational success. It examines new risk assessment models and proactive strategic planning concepts. It places emphasis on measurable metrics as applied to dealing with workplace violence, anti-terrorism and other security threats. Prerequisites: OSH 201 or consent of the instructor. (F;S;S)

ESH 293. Safety Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on the industrial manager’s role in preventing accidents, protecting workers’ health and maintaining safety awareness in the workplace. (F;S;S)

ESH 305. Fire Protection Law Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers Fire Protection Law. Topics include torts, legal terms, liability, review of case histories and other related topics. Upon completion the student should be able to discuss laws, codes and ordinances as they relate to the fire service. Prerequisite: OSH 205. (F;S;S)

ESH 311. Hazardous Materials for the Safety Professional Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an introduction to the principles of liquid and solid hazardous waste management. An emphasis is placed on pertinent federal regulatory legislation and environmental effects of released contaminants. Prerequisite: CHEM 107 or equivalent. (F;S;S)

ESH 313. Industrial Hygiene I Credit 4(3-3)
This course is an overview of the principles of industrial hygiene. An emphasis is placed on the quantitative evaluation of physical and chemical work-place hazards and pertinent standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Topics of discussion include industrial noise, particulate, solvents, hazard communication, heat stress, and biohazards. Reference is made to the anatomical systems affected by exposures. Laboratory work emphasizes hands-on experience with state-of-the-art industrial hygiene survey equipment. Prerequisites: PHYS 226 and 236 or equivalent CHEM 107 or equivalent BIOL 361 and MATH 111 or equivalent. (F;S;S)

ESH 316. Industrial Hygiene II Credit 4(3-3)
This course is a continuation of OSH 413. Topics of discussion include ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation, ergonomics, toxicology, industrial ventilation, general ventilation, and respiratory protection. An emphasis is placed on methods of control of work place hazards. Prerequisite: OSH 413. (F;S;S)

ESH 317. Introduction to Job Search, Internship and Work Environment Credit 3(3-0)
A course designed to develop practical job search and internship skills to increase the student’s options and opportunities for locating immediate and appropriate job sites. Emphasis will be placed on developing the self-knowledge, grammar, and skills necessary to write a traditional resume, participate in a job interview, personal profile, and develop a plan of action for employment in the local job market. Prerequisites: OSH 210 or consent of the instructor. (F;S;S)

ESH 342. Electrical Safety Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an overview of the identification and control of the fire and electrocution hazards of electrical wiring and equipment. An emphasis is placed on the National Electric Code and electrical standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration found in the Code of Federal Regulations. Prerequisites: OSH 312 and PHYS 226. (F;S;SS)

ESH 394. Environmental Health Credit 3(3-0)
This course begins with the major concepts and principles of environmental health, emphasizing the chemical, biological and physical agents and factors that constitute a risk to humans. The principles and methods of risk assessment and risk management are identified and used throughout the course as a unifying theme. Prerequisite: OSH 201. (F;S;S)

ESH 405. Portable and Fixed Extinguishing Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides a study of various types of fixed and portable extinguishing systems, their operation, installation and maintenance. Topics include applications, testing and maintenance of Halons, carbon dioxide, dry chemical and special extinguishing agents in fixed portable systems. Upon completion, students should be able to identify various types of fixed and portable systems, including their proper application and maintenance. Prerequisite: OSH 305. (F;S;S)

ESH 408. Evaluation for Environmental Health and Safety Credit 3(1-4)
This course is an introduction to technical writing for the Environmental Health and Safety profession. An emphasis is placed on documentation of calibration and analytical methods for industrial hygiene hazard evaluation. Prerequisite: OSH 210. (F;S;S)

ESH 410. Workplace Violence Prevention and Reaction Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides students with an understanding of the holistic and systems approach towards preventing and responding to workplace violence. Students learn how to design a multidisciplinary strategy involving senior management, union officials, human resource managers, labor law attorneys, employee assistance program professionals, security, safety, public relations and maintenance. Prerequisites. OSH 312 or consent of the instructor. (F;S;S)

ESH 415. Standards and Regulations in Environmental Health and Safety Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an overview of regulatory compliance in the field of Environmental Health and Safety. An emphasis is placed on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards for general industry and construction. Prerequisite: OSH 201. (F;S;S)

ESH 426. Terrorism and Workplace Safety Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides students with the tools and skills to understand theory behind terrorism. Historical background, definitions, tactics, ideologies and terrorism’s impact on twenty-first century civilization around the world will be explored. Both current and historical events are analyzed within course context to provide experiential learning and development of critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: OSH 210 or consent of the instruction. (F;S;S)

ESH 432. Design of Engineering Hazard Controls Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an overview of the design and assessment of engineering controls for the abatement of health and safety hazards in the work-place. An emphasis is placed on cost benefit analysis, and technical and financial feasibility. Topics of discussion include industrial noise abatement, industrial ventilation, machine guarding, and walking and working surfaces. Prerequisites: OSH 416, MFG 191 and 491. Senior or Graduate Standing. (F;S;S)

ESH 433. Human Factors Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an overview of the discipline of human factors. Emphasis is placed on ergonomics and the hazards of physical work, including cumulative trauma disorders, lower back injuries, and over-work. Topics of discussion include system theory and reliability calculation, cost/benefit analysis, signal detection theory, human perception, and anthropometry. Prerequisite: PSYC 445 or equivalent. (F;S;S)

ESH 435. Environmental Health and Safety Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an overview of the application of management principles to the establishment and maintenance of Environmental Health and Safety programs. An emphasis is placed on written safety and health programs in compliance with standards from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Prerequisites OSH 312 and BUAD 422. (F;S;S)

EHS 437. Machine and Welding Safety Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the general safety practices and precautions that all welders and safety professionals should follow during welding procedures. Topics such as health factors, ventilation, hot-work management, safe practices and personal protective equipment are covered. Further hazards related to welding such as: electrical shock, arc radiation, air contamination, fire and explosion and compressed gasses are studied. Prerequisites: OSH 312 and PHYS 226. Senior or graduate standing. (F;S;SS)

ESH 438. Materials Handling for the Safety Professional Credit 3(2-3)
This course is an introduction to the recognition, evaluation, and control of work place hazards associated with the handling of materials. An emphasis is placed on the materials handling and storage standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Prerequisites: OSH 210 and MATH 111 or equivalent. (F;S;S)

ESH 455. Health Physics Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to health physics. Emphasis is placed on the physics of radiation, adverse health effects of radiation, time/distance/shielding control of exposure, and regulations of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission found in the Code of Federal Regulations. Prerequisite: PHYS 226 or approval of instructor. (F;S;S)

ESH 472. System Safety and Other Analytical Methods Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an overview of system theory and process safety management. An emphasis is placed on regulatory compliance with the process safety management standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Topics of discussion include fault tree analysis, failure modes, and risk analysis and management. Prerequisites: MATH 224 or equivalent and OSH 411. Senior or Graduate Standing. (F;S;S)

ESH 497. Industrial Experience I Credit 3(3-0)
Students must work in industry during one semester or summer (300 hours) in their major field and complete all Departmental requirements. They will be evaluated on reports from on-site supervisors and the University coordinator. (F;S;S)

ESH 498. Industrial Experience II Credit 3(3-0)
Students must work in industry during one semester or summer (300 hours) in their major field and complete all Departmental requirements. They will be evaluated on reports from on-site supervisors and the University coordinator. (F;S;S)

ESH 505. Fire Fighting Strategies Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides preparation for command of initial incident operations involving emergencies within both the public and private sector. Topics include incident management, fire-ground tactics and strategies, incident safety and command/control of emergency operations. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the initial incident system as it relates to operations involving various emergencies in fire and non-fire situations. In addition, students study fire strategies as they relate to selected NFPA standards. Prerequisite OSH 405. (F;S;S)

ESH 599. Independent Study in Environmental Health and Safety Credit 3(3-0)
Students who have given evidence of their ability to do serious individual study on a professional level and to plan and carry out a project of their own choosing should consider this course. This course is subject to approval and supervision of a faculty member. (F;S;S)

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Christian A. Bock-Hyeng
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.Sc., Dr. Eng., Russian People’s Friendship University

Peggy A. Fersner
Adjunct Associate Professor
B.S., Virginia Tech; M Engr., Clemson University

Tony Graham
Associate Professor
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., Ph.D., Morgan State University

Iman J. Moore
Adjunct Instructor
B.S., M.S., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Jerry W. Nave
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., East Tennessee State University

Andrea Ofori-Boadu
Adjunct Instructor
B.S., University of Science and Technology, Ghana, M.S., North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., Indiana State University

Robert B. Pyle
Professor and Department Chairperson
B.A., M.A., Trenton State College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

Musibau A. Shofoluwe
Professor
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Pittsburgh State University; DIT University of Northern Iowa

Lewis S. Waller
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D.; Capella University

Frank E. Yeboah
Assistant Professor
M.E.; Technical University of Clausthal, Germany; D.Eng-Sc., Columbia University