Department of Computer Systems Technology

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/sot/cst/index.html

Clay Gloster, Jr., Chairperson

OBJECTIVES

The Department of Computer Systems Technology prepares students to pursue technical, as well as technical management careers in all employment sectors. The program emphasizes acquisition of sound theoretical studies, as well as intensive “hands-on” experiences in the area of information technology. The department emphasizes development of “real world” competencies demanded by employers. Students receive thorough grounding in information technology; electronics; digital and microprocessor systems; computer networking; communication systems; power and  renewable energy; and computer programming. Additional emphasis is placed on courses in business management that instill an appreciation for the economic and managerial aspects of the business enterprise.

DEGREE OFFERED

Electronics Technology – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Information Technology – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The admission of students into the undergraduate degree program in the Department of Computer Systems Technology (CST) is based upon the general admission requirements of the University.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

Students must complete 126 semester hours of coursework and a minimum grade of “C” in all denoted courses on the curriculum guide.

Graduates of appropriate associate degree programs may receive transfer credit for courses previously taken.  Specific course requirements for these students will have to be determined on an individual basis after their previously earned credits have been assessed.

Any student transferring to the degree programs in the Department of Computer Systems Technology from other disciplines must have a minimum grade point average of 2.5.

ACCREDITATION

The Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE) accredits all undergraduate degree programs in the department.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CST graduates are very successful in receiving employment in both the public and private sectors with positions in technology, engineering technology, engineering, and management. Typical job titles include: process engineer, application engineer, systems analyst, network administrator, project manager, information technologist, test engineer, industrial technologist, and engineering technologist. Major employers include: IBM, Fidelity Investment, Verizon, Bank of America, Dell, Wells-Fargo, John Deere, Cisco Systems, Accenture, State Employees Credit Union, and numerous public agencies.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY

ECT 101. Microcomputer Applications Credit 3(2-2)
This course is designed to provide the student with basic computer skills as required in a typical business and technical environment. Emphasis is on business and technical software packages including spreadsheets, database management, word-processing, etc. as run on a Windows platform. (F;S;SS)

ECT 120. Quantitative Fundamentals of Electronics and Computer Technology Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides the quantitative background needed in the field of electronics, computer, and information technology. Topics include arithmetic review, algebra, basic trigonometry, complex algebra, statistics, and Boolean algebra and fundamental units, as they relate to electronics, information and computer technology. (F;S;SS)

ECT 198. Freshman Project Credits 1(0-3)
Under the direction and guidance of departmental faculty, the student will perform independently selected laboratory experiments to reinforce concepts and experimental techniques learned in the first year of study in the major. In addition, the student will build and test a series of approved software and electronic projects. Each project will be accompanied by an exam which will test the student's understanding of basic concepts underlying the project. Prerequisites: ECT 101, 120, 201, and 211. (F;S;SS)

ECT 201. Introduction to Computer Programming Credit 3(2-2)
This course gives an introduction to computer programming. Topics include structured program development and the use of a high level programming language to develop software applications. Prerequisites: ECT 101. (F;S;SS)

ECT 211. Electric Circuits I Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a study of the fundamentals of direct current electrical circuits. Topics include series, parallel, series-parallel networks, Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Laws, network theorems, and practical applications. Prerequisites: ECT 120 and MATH 110 or 111. (F;S;SS)

ECT 212. Electric Circuits II Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a continuations of Electric Circuits I. Topics include network analysis, power factor correction, complex impedance, polyphase systems, filters, resonance, and simple dynamos. Prerequisite: ECT 211. (F;S;SS)

ECT 213. Digital Circuits Credit 3(2-2)
This course deals with digital logic fundamentals. Topics include combinational and sequential circuits and systems. Karnaugh maps and software tools are utilized. Prerequisite: ECT 211. (F;S;SS)

ECT 298. Sophomore Project Credits 2(0-4)
Under the direction and guidance of departmental faculty, the student will perform independently selected laboratory experiments to reinforce concepts and experimental techniques learned in the second year of study in the major. In addition, the student will build and test a series of approved software and electronic projects. Each project will be accompanied by an exam, which will test the student's understanding of basic concepts underlying the project. Prerequisites: ECT 212, 213, 312, and 313. (F;S;SS)

ECT 299. Survey of Electronics and Computer Technology Credit 3(2-2)
This course provides a comprehensive introductory survey of analog and digital electronics. Some of the topics covered in this course include: voltage, current, resistance, types of electronic components and circuits, semiconductor devices, and hands-on lab instructions. This course is intended as a bridge course for non-majors who are interested in taking more advance electronics, computer and information technology classes. Prerequisites: MATH 102 or 110 or 111 or ECT 120. (F;S;SS)

ECT 312. Electronic Devices and Circuits I Credit 3(2-2)
This course provides a comprehensive treatment of topics in electronic devices. Topics to be covered include basic to advance theories of electronics devices such as diodes, Bipolar-Junction transistors, and Operational amplifiers with hands on laboratories to be complemented by the use of software simulation packages. Prerequisites: ECT 212 or 299. (F;S;SS)

ECT 313. Electronic Microcomputer Systems I Credit 3(2-2)
This course addresses the programming and interfacing of microcomputer based systems. Prerequisite: ECT 213. (F;S;SS)

ECT 314. Electronic Devices and Circuits II Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a continuation of ECT 312. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the fundamental theories and applications of electronic devices such as Junction Field-Effect Transistors, Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors, Operational Amplifiers, Thyristors, and active filters. The course will include hands on laboratories which will be complemented by the use of software simulation packages. Prerequisites: ECT 312. (F;S;SS)

ECT 330. Robotics and Controls I Credit 3(2-2)
This course deals with the fundamentals of first and second order electromechanical dynamic systems, frequency and time domain analysis of the systems, sensors and actuators, structure and specification of industrial robots, and robot control fundamentals. Prerequisites: ECT 312 and MATH 132. (F;S;SS)

ECT 334. Electronic Instrumentation Credit 3(2-2)
This course is designed to develop basic competencies related to components and circuits used in instrumentation to include basic transistor configurations; voltage regulators; integrated circuit operational amplifiers, amplifier feedback principles and DC to DC converters. Prerequisite: ECT 312. (F;S;SS)

ECT 350. Communications Systems Credit 3(2-2)
This course investigates the fundamental concepts of electronic communications systems. Topics include: Amplitude Modulation (AM), Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Modulation (PM), digital modulation schemes, principles of power spectra and time domain analysis. Prerequisite: ECT 312. (F;S;SS)

ECT 355. Electrical Power and Machinery Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a study of electrical machines and power systems. Topics include dc motors, single phase and 3 phase induction motors, synchronous generators, motor drives and power system transmission and distribution. Prerequisite: ECT 212. (F;S;SS)

ECT 360. Industrial Electronics and Controls Credit 3(2-2)
This course addresses the role of electronic circuits and control systems in industry. The topics include application of power semiconductor devices for conversion and control of electrical energy, electromechanical devices, fundamentals of open and closed loop control systems, process control, and Programmable logic controllers. Prerequisite: ECT 312. (F;S;SS)

ECT 390. Special Topics Credit 3(2-2)
This course is used to introduce new topics in the field of electronics, computer or information technology. The subject matter will be identified prior to the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson. (F;S;SS)

ECT 398. Junior Project Credits 2(0-4)
Under the direction and guidance of departmental faculty, the student will perform independently selected laboratory experiments to reinforce concepts and experimental techniques learned during the third year of study.  In addition, the student will build and test a series of approved software and electronic projects. Each project will be accompanied by a formal report on the project. Also examinations will be given to test the student's understanding of basic concepts underlying the projects. Technical writing and project management skills will be emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisites: Junior Standing. (F;S;SS)

ECT 399. Independent Study Credit 3(0-6)
This course allows a student to select a technical problem from the fields of electronics, computer or information technology for special research and study in consultation with a faculty member in the area of interest. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (F;S;SS)

ECT 413. Electronic Microcomputer Systems II – Embedded Systems Credit 3(2-2)
This project oriented course will introduce students to standalone measurement and control systems. Programming and interfacing at both the hardware and software level will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: ECT 313. (F;S;SS)

ECT 414. Introduction to Semiconductor Device Physics and Fabrication Credit 3(2-2)
The course provides basic treatment of the physics of semiconductor materials and of solid state electronics and photonic devices (eg. low frequency diodes, bipolar transistors, microwave Gunn diodes, semiconductor lasers, etc.). Techniques used in micro-, nano-, and mems- technologies for fabricating devices are detailed. Laboratory work includes simple measurements and tests of semiconductor materials and device characteristics. Prerequisites: PHYS 242, 252, ECT 314. (F;S;SS)

ECT 430. Robotics and Controls II Credit 3(2-2)
The course is the continuation of ECT 330. Emphasis of the course will be on the details of control systems, foundations and principle of robotic manipulation, and detailed case studies of the existing systems. The course will also discuss the programming, design and building of a prototype robot. Prerequisite: ECT 330. (F;S;SS)

ECT 460. Industrial Electronics and Controls II Credit 3(2-2)
This course is the continuation of ECT 360. Emphasis is on the analysis of complex industrial control systems, robotics, advanced topics in programmable logic controllers, and the role of electronics in industry. Prerequisite: ECT 360. (F;S;SS)

ECT 598. Senior Project: A Capstone Experience Credit 3(0-6)
Under the direction and guidance of departmental faculty, the student will perform independently selected laboratory experiments to reinforce concepts and experimental techniques learned during the fourth year of study. In addition, the student will build and test a series of approved software and electronic projects. Each project will be accompanied by a formal report on the project. Also examinations will be given to test the student's understanding of basic concepts underlying the projects. Technical writing and project management skills will be stressed throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. (F;S;SS)

ECT 599. Independent Study Credit 3(0-6)
The student selects a technical problem in electronics or computer technology for special research and study in consultation with a faculty member in area of interest. The student will spend a minimum of six (6) hours per week in library research or laboratory experimentation. A technical report in standard format is required for completion and approved by faculty. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing with department chair approval. (F;S;SS)

ITT 236. Applied C Programming I Credit 3(2-2)
This course covers the study of programming language structure concepts for microcomputers. The course emphasizes programming in C and its application to software and hardware development for technological applications. Topics covered in the course include C operators, flow control statements, function, pointers and arrays, I/O structures and library routines. Prerequisite: ECT 201. (F;S;SS)

ITT 237. Applied C++ Programming I Credit 3(2-2)
This is an introductory course in computing in C++. The course places emphasis on algorithm development and problem solving. Particular elements include: careful and methodical development of C++ programs from specifications; documentation and style; appropriate use of control structures, data types and subprograms; data abstraction and verification; numeric and nonnumeric applications; introduction to object-oriented programming and design. Prerequisite: ECT 201. (F;S;SS)

ITT 238. Applied RPG Programming I Credit 3(2-2)
This course introduces computer programming using the Report Program Generator (RPG) programming language. Topics include input/output operations, sequence, selection, iteration, arithmetic operations, arrays/tables, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test, and debug RPG language programs. Prerequisite: ECT 201. (F;S;SS)

ITT 239. Applied Visual Basic Programming I Credit 3(2-2)
A course covering the fundamentals of the Windows GUI (Graphical User Interface) operating system and Visual Basic as a Windows-based application development language. This course will use practical problems to illustrate application-building techniques as well as take advantage of new capabilities of building applications in a graphical environment, such as building special-purpose, professional-looking applications. Topics include input/output operations, sequence, selection, iteration, arithmetic operations, arrays, forms, sequential files, and other related topics. Prerequisite: ECT 201. (F;S;SS)

ITT 240. Applied JAVA Programming Credit 3(2-2)
The course provides a comprehensive overview of basic programming concepts, the Java programming language using an object-oriented approach, and the software development life cycle. The course emphasizes problem solving and good practices for program construction, documentation, testing, and debugging. Prerequisite: ECT 201. (F;S;SS)

ITT 300. Introduction to Project Management for Information Technology Professionals Credit 3(2-2)
This course introduces the concept of project management to information technology majors. It will also teach students to create work breakdown structures, identify task dependencies and prerequisites, and identify a critical path to completion of a project.  Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 301. Managing, Maintaining, and Troubleshooting Hardware Credit 3(2-2)
This course will introduce the student to the practical hardware aspects of personal computers. Topics include installation of hardware, configuration, troubleshooting, and networking. Prerequisites: ECT 213 and sophomore standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 302. Managing, Maintaining, and Troubleshooting Credit 3(2-2)
This course will introduce the student to the practical software aspects of personal computers. Topics include the installation of operating systems, configuration, and troubleshooting, and basic networking. Prerequisite: ITT 301. (F;S;SS)

ITT 303. Introduction to High Performance Computing Credit 3(2-2)
This course provides an overview of the basic system, network, security, and programming aspects of High Performance Computing. Students will be introduced to the advantages and disadvantages of various machine architectures, programming models, and problem types. Students will learn basic high performance computing cluster configuration and use. Prerequisite: ECT 213. (F;S;SS)

ITT 304. High Performance Computing Architecture and System Administration Credit 3(2-2)
Topics covered in this course include: classification and management of high performance computing clusters. The course also includes an in-depth study of high performance system board components, memory management, supporting input and output devices, troubleshooting, and disaster recovery techniques. Prerequisite: ITT 303. (F;S;SS)

ITT 305. Foundations of Storage Technology Credit 3(2-2)
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to data storage technology fundamentals using case studies and laboratory experiments. Students will gain knowledge of the core logical and physical components that make up a storage system’s infrastructure. Prerequisite: ITT 301 or consent of chairperson. (F;S;SS)

ITT 306. Storage Networking Technology Credit 3(2-2)
This course provides an in-depth study of networked storage technologies including Storage Area Networks (SAN) and Networked Attached Storage (NAS) environments. Prerequisites: ITT 305 or consent of chairperson. (F;S;SS)

ITT 307. Storage Networking Management Credit 3(2-2)
This course provides an in-depth study of management and data recovery processes for networked storage devices and systems. Prerequisite: ITT 305 or consent of chairperson. (F;S;SS)

ITT 315. Network Security Applications for Information Technology Professionals Credit 3(2-2)
This course focuses on basic concepts in network security. It aims to introduce students to the fundamental techniques used in implementing secure network communications, and to give them an understanding of common threats and attacks, as well as some practical experience in attacking and defending networked systems.  Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 320. Telecommunications Management Credit 3(2-2)
This course addresses fundamental principles of telecommunications management, which includes network management and administration, the telecommunications marketplace, and the planning and evaluation of systems. The technology of modern telecommunications systems is also reviewed. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 325. Computer Database Management Credit 3(2-2)
This course focuses exclusively on the design and system issues related to distributed database systems. Students will learn the usage of different design strategies for distributed databases, and they will study query processing techniques and algorithms as well as transaction management and concurrency control concepts used in such systems. Design and implementation issues related to multi-database systems also will be discussed. In addition, the course focuses on applying the techniques learned in the course to commercial database management systems. Prerequisite: None. (F;S;SS)

ITT 329. Computer Networking I Credit 3(2-2)
This course introduces the student to Local Area Networks (LAN) and introduction to Wide Area Networks (WAN). The course also will provide the basic understanding of network concepts and router programming. Prerequisites: ECT 212 and 213 or 299. (F;S;SS)

ITT 330. Computer Networking II Credit 3(2-2)
This course covers the advanced study of Local Area Networks (LAN) and Wide Area Networks (WAN). The students will develop competences in designing and implementing enterprise-wide networks using routers and switches. Prerequisite: ITT 329. (F;S;SS)

ITT 337. Applied C++ Programming II Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a continuation of ITT 237 using C++ with structured programming principles. The course will solve representative technology problems using advanced C++ commands, with a focus on: writing in object oriented style, computer control of input/output port control, stand-alone executable code, and library linking for various applications. Prerequisite: ITT 237. (F;S;SS)

ITT 338. Applied RPG Programming II Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a continuation of ITT 238 using RPG with structured programming principles. Emphasis is placed on advanced arrays/tables, file management/processing techniques, sub-programs, interactive processing, sort/merge routines, and libraries. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test, debug, and document programming solutions. Prerequisite: ITT 238. (F;S;SS)

ITT 339. Applied Visual BASIC Programming II Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a continuation of ITT 239. The topics of the course are designed to provide the Visual Basic student with knowledge of additional tools, advanced concepts, and code syntax to create Visual Basic programs that conform to the Windows standards. The intent is to provide the student with advance knowledge to create programs that meet the demand of today's information technology environment. Prerequisite: ITT 239. (F;S;SS)

ITT 340. Introduction to Mainframe Operations Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an introduction to mainframe operations including concepts and functions of the OS/MVS operating system. Topics include virtual storage, Job Control Language (JCL), data management, data set organization, compilers, and linkage editor. Additional, topics include the study of instream data sets, portioned data sets, temporary and cataloged sequential data sets, and cataloged procedures. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 350. Introduction to Database 2 (DB2) Concepts Credit 3(2-2)
This course covers the concepts, approaches, and techniques for using the Database Management Systems (DBMS) included with the Multiple Virtual Storage (MVS) operating system. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 355. Network Servers Credit 3(2-2)
This course covers the activities and methods required to assure productive and reliable operation of network servers. Topics include planning, installing, configuring, and maintaining servers, including knowledge of server-level hardware implementations, operating systems, data storage subsystems, data recovery, and I/O subsystems. Upon completion, students should be able to configure and maintain a network server. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 385. Economic and Social Impacts of Information Technology Credit 3(2-2)
This course is designed to assess critically the institutional forces that shape and create the demand for information technology (IT). It will also discuss how the consumption of IT impacts the economy and society. This course will help participants think about how changing social and economic conditions determine what technologies are consumed and how they are consumed, who consumes them and where they are consumed. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 398. Junior Project Credit 2(0-4)
Under the direction and guidance of departmental faculty, the student will perform independently selected laboratory experiments to reinforce concepts and experimental techniques learned in the first two years of study in the major.  In addition, the student will build and test project(s). Prerequisite: Junior standing. (F;S;SS)

ITT 401. Introduction to Parallel Programming Credit 3(2-2)
This course covers parallel computing fundamentals including models of parallel computing, architecture taxonomy, memory architecture, performance, design, and scalability considerations, parallel programming paradigms, techniques and issues in parallel program creation, and parallel programming examples. Prerequisite: ECT 201 or consent of instructor. (F;S;SS)

ITT 420. Introduction to Unix/Linux Credit 3(2-2)
The course will cover network management utilizing various Unix products, such as Linux and Solaris operating systems. Topics will include networking operating system (NOS) setup, network resource management, user and group management, and the security model. Prerequisite: ECT 201. (F;S;SS)

ITT 423. Computer Systems Architecture Credit 3(2-2)
This course introduces the organization and design philosophy of computer systems with respect to resource management, throughput, and operating system interaction. Topics include instruction sets, registers, data types, memory management and hierarchy, virtual memory, cache, storage management, vector and multi-processing, CPU design, arithmetic algorithms, I/O communication techniques, RISC architectures, and pipelining. Prerequisite: ECT 313. (F;S;SS)

ITT 430. Linux Systems Administration Credit 3(2-2)
This course presents the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to install, manage, and maintain a Linux Operating System. Students will learn to install the system, add users, configure devices, and maintain system security. Prerequisite: ITT 420. (F;S;SS) 

ITT 431. Advanced Programming Techniques with an OOP Language Credit 3 (2-2)
This course uses programming examples (employing an object-oriented programming language such as Visual C++ / J++ to introduce concepts in advanced data structures (stacks, queues, trees, graphs, hash tables, etc.) and algorithms (sorting, searching, etc.). Object-oriented programming techniques are also detailed. Application to design of large scale programs and software engineering. Prerequisite: ECT 201. (F;S;SS)

ITT 598. Senior Project: An Information Technology Capstone Experience Credit 3(0-6)
Under the direction and guidance of departmental faculty, the student will perform independently selected information technology (IT) laboratory experiments to reinforce concepts and experimental techniques learned during the four years of study. In addition, the student will build and test a series of approved IT projects. Each IT project will be accompanied by a formal report on the project. Also, examinations will be given to test the student's understanding of basic concepts underlying the projects. Technical writing and IT project management skills will be stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F;S;SS)

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Rajeev Agrawal
Assistant Professor
B.S., G.B. Pant University; M.S., Thaper University; Ph.D., Wayne State University

Thomas Avery
Assistant Professor
B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Derek Brandon
Adjunct Instructor
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., American Intercontinental University

DeWayne Brown
Professor
B.S., University of South Carolina; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Gina Bullock
Adjunct Instructor
B.S., Shaw University, M.S. North Carolina A&T State University

Naser El-Bathy
Assistant Professor
B.A., Cairo University, M.S., Wayne State University, Ph.D., Lawrence Technological University

Clay Gloster, Jr.
Professor and Chairperson
B.S.,M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Howard Hardiman
Adjunct Instructor
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., Michigan State University

Ibrahim Kateeb
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of Science and Technology (Yarmouk University); M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State University

Cameron Seay
Assistant Professor
B.A., City University of New York; M.B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Georgia State University

Evelyn Sowells
Adjunct Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State University

Li-Shiang Tsay
Associate Professor
B.A., M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Qing-An Zeng
Assistant Professor
B.S., Chengdu University of Information Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Shizuoka University