Theatre Program

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/cas/vpa/theatre-program/index.html

Frankie Day, Program Director

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the Theatre Arts Program are as follows:

  1. to teach students how to use theatre as a means of self-expression, awareness, and discipline,
  2. to acquaint students with  the great works of the theatre through  reading and producing them,
  3. to prepare students for professional careers in acting and technology,
  4. to prepare students for admission into graduate schools,
  5. to convey the skills necessary to promote theatre as a means of enhancing culture in the community, and,
  6. to assist students in developing the skills necessary to participate in global Theatre opportunities through studies of the histories and cultures of selected peoples, participate in plays, and meetings with dramatists, actors, artists, and intellectuals from other countries and cultures.

DEGREES OFFERED

Professional Theatre (Acting)– Bachelor of Fine Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Professional Theatre (Theatre Technology)– Bachelor of Fine Arts (Curriculum Guide)

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

  1. Admission is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. All majors must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.0. If your GPA drops below 2.0 you will not be cast for any productions or given crew assignments until your GPA is 2.0 or better. Recommendations will be made by your academic advisor to attend tutorial sessions.
  2. Students must pass an annual juried evaluation in acting or technology. The evaluation will be based on the improvement in creativity, technique, attitude, and determination.
  3. The fulfillment of acting, audition, and crew assignments – except when advance exemptions by faculty have been granted – is expected.
  4. Transfer students with previous training will be evaluated by the faculty, who might exempt the student from certain requirements. The exemptions will depend on demonstrated ability and experience.
  5. The students must earn at least a “C” in all theatre courses listed on the curriculum guide in his/her concentration.
  6. Anyone showing a fundamental weakness in an area of study might be requested by the Theatre Arts Program Director to take additional course work in the area.
  7. Active participation is expected in at least two of the following organizations: The Richard B. Harrison Players, Alpha Psi Omega, NCTC, SETC, the Black Theatre Network, or the National Association of Dramatic and Speech Arts.
  8. All students under the acting concentration must audition for all main stage productions, faculty directed studio productions and the Richard B. Harrison Players.
  9. All students must participate in load-ins and strikes of all main stage productions – unless excused beforehand by the executive director of theatre, theatre arts program director, the director of the play, or the technical director.
  10. Only graduating seniors will be allowed to appear or participate in off-campus commercial productions. Exceptions for students other than seniors will be considered once the following steps have been completed: (1) The student submits a letter to the theatre program chair stating the producing organization in which he/she is wanting to work , his/her time commitment to the project,  the reason he/she wishes to participate in  the project and the benefits he/she will receive; (2) An interview with the theatre program director  to review current GPA, completed course work, class attendance, past and present theatre participation; (3) An interview with the faculty along with the program director who will then make the final decision.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.F.A IN PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
(Acting)

In order to become a candidate for the B.F.A. with an option in Acting, the student must:

-     Make as least a “B” in Acting I and II.
-     Candidates must exemplify;
          a.    Attributes of a professional artist, which includes talent, a willingness to learn and develop, discipline, commitment, and cooperation.
          b.   Potential leadership skills.
          c.   Genuine love, respect, and appreciation of the theatre.
          d.   Active involvement during the first year of residency.
-     Pass a ten-minute acting audition and interview. The acting audition should include two or more of the following contrasting pieces: comedy, drama, tragedy, and song and dance. The passing average is 80%.
-     Present a ten-minute one-person show for the senior showcase during the senior year,
-     Perform an audition at two of the following events:
          a.   M.F.A. Program
          b.   North Carolina Theatre Conference (NCTC)
          c.   Southeastern Theatre Conference (SETC)
          d.   Irene Ryan Audition
          e.   University/Regional Theatre Audition (URTA)
          f.   Local, Regional or National Professional Theatre Companies

In addition to the curricular requirements, the students must complete such co-curricular obligations as (a) the pre-qualifying audition, (b) the qualifying audition, (c) the progress evaluation, (d) general audition, (e) production assignment, and  (f) the senior thesis project.

THE QUALIFYING AUDITION

This audition will occur in the student’s second or third semester of residency, at a date and time to be assigned by the Theatre Arts Program Director.

  1. The Qualifying Audition must be at least ten minutes in length.
  2. The judges will consist of the student’s academic advisor, along with two members of the performance faculty.
  3. It will be the student’s responsibility to select the materials performed. The academic advisor, however, must approve the student’s selections.
  4. Approval of the material by a performance faculty member must be obtained by the end of the semester prior to the one in which the student is required to perform. The  performance faculty member must also approve any subsequent changes the student wishes to make in the selection. (NOTE: These stipulations are for the student’s protection. They are designed to guarantee that the student allows sufficient time for preparation and to insure that the material he/she selects is appropriate.)
  5. Preparation of the qualifying material is solely the responsibility of the student.
  6. The BFA Acting audition will be held the first semester of each year. Should a student’s qualifying performance be deemed unsatisfactory, he/she will be required to repeat it the following semester. The Theatre Arts Program Director will assign a new date. The student’s academic advisor must approve any changes in the qualifying material.

The comments and opinions of the student’s adjudicators will be collected by the academic advisor and communicated orally to the student within one week after the performance. In the event of an unsatisfactory rating, a written explanation will be given to the student.

PROGRESS REVIEW EVALUATION

The Theatre Faculty will evaluate each student at the end of each academic year during jury hearings. Evaluation is based on observation of production activities (quality and quantity) and on academic progress toward the degree. Recommendations resulting from the evaluation will be reported to the student by the academic advisor.

AUDITIONS

All Acting students are required to audition for all main stage productions and for the Richard B. Harrison Players, the department’s varsity organization. Each student is also required to make a professional audition at two or more of the following: The North Carolina Theatre Conference, Southeastern Theatre Conference, University/ Resident Theatre Conference, the Irene Ryan Acting Award Competition, M.F.A. Acting Programs, Local, Regional, or National Professional Theatre Companies.

PRODUCTION ASSIGNMENT

Each student must serve as Assistant Director or Stage Manager for at least one major departmental production or Studio production. This requirement must be met at some point during the student’s first six semesters of residency. Evidence of its completion must be furnished in writing by the student to the Theatre Arts program director.

SENIOR THESIS PROJECT

The Acting student’s degree program culminates with a staged  senior showcase, performance. The performance is the student’s final demonstration of his/her craft proficiency and, as such, is a project the student should begin planning as early as possible in his/her residency. To ensure protection of the student’s interests and to provide a reasonable guarantee that a project of the highest quality will result, the Theatre program has adopted specific procedures for the selection, preparation, and execution of the Senior thesis project. This information is listed in detail in the Theatre Arts Student Handbook.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.F.A IN PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
(Theatre Technology)

The Theatre Technology option offers professional training in the crafts and arts of the technician.

The objective is to combine course work in Theatre technology with ample opportunities to construct fully mounted productions. The curriculum is a carefully structured series of courses aimed at covering the full gamut of technical productions. All courses are of practical variety; student technicians are given specific problems and are asked to find workable solutions. Faculty and peer-evaluation assist the student in perfecting skills.

The program presupposes that entering students have little or no background in technical theatre and design. Therefore, we introduce them to design and provide technical background in the crafts. Every student technician spends at least one semester as a costumer, master carpenter, shop foreman, master electrician, stage manager, sound technician, properties master,  costume master, and assistant technical director. During those semesters, the student is given full responsibility for the areas assigned him/her, with, of course, ample assistance from the faculty. Each student serves a senior directing project as the studio theatre’s technical director, allowing him/her the experience of personnel management, purchasing, and scheduling.

It should be noted in this regard that the constant diet of twelve-hour workdays extending to midnight and beyond, which are commonplace for tech students in many institutions is not allowed here. We feel strongly that students spending that much time and energy in shop cannot possibly achieve the full measure of growth in the art. Therefore, all production work is carefully scheduled so that it can be completed no later than 11:00 PM. However, Saturdays and Sundays will be used for specifically called times.

We realize that our students arrive with the kind of total commitment required for success in the theatre. We assume further that they come with basic insights, if not necessarily the kind of training or experience, needed for effective work. We look, therefore, upon our course work as an experimentation and practice. To intensify that experience, the student technician is normally given from four to eight major departmental productions to work on as a technician.

We wish to give the student as much learning time as possible. We assume that students want to leave an undergraduate school ready to deal with the realities of professional theatre work. We consider it our function to provide them with an opportunity to spend at least three years working with what is, in effect, a company with excellent artistic directions that can assist the student in learning and refining skills and broadening experiences. We do not promise to make every student a great technician; we do promise to make every student as good a pre-professional technician as capability allows.

In order to become a candidate for the B.F.A. with an option in Technology, the student must do the following:

-     Make at least a “B” in Stagecraft and Elements of Play Production.
-     Candidates must exemplify
       a.    Attributes of a professional artist, which includes talent, a willingness to learn and develop, discipline, commitment, and cooperation.
       b.    Potential leadership skills
       c.    Genuine love, respect, and appreciation of the theatre
       d.    Active involvement during the first year of residency
-     Pass an interview, resume and portfolio review. The technology review will consist of the student presenting his/her resume, any and all projects along with their portfolio as it presently stands.
-     Design and/or technically direct a main stage production by the end of their senior year.
-     Present Portfolio and interview at two of the following:
       a.    M.F.A. Program
       b.    North Carolina Theatre Conference (NCTC)
       c.    Southeastern Theatre Conference (SETC)
       d.    United States Institute of Theatre Technology (U. S. I.T.T.)
       e.    University/Regional Theatre Audition (URTA)
       f.    Local, Regional or National Professional Theatre Companies

In addition to the curricular requirements, the student must complete such co-curricular obligations as (a) the qualifying interview (b) the progress evaluation, (c) portfolio and resume presentation (d) production assignment, and (e) the senior thesis project.

THE QUALIFYING AUDITION

This interview will occur in the student’s second or third residence at a date and time assigned to the student by the Theatre Arts Program Director.

  1. The Qualifying Interview must include resume and portfolio.
  2. The judges will consist of the student’s academic advisor, along with two members of the technology and design faculty.
  3. It will be the student’s responsibility to select the materials to be included in their resume and portfolio. A member of the technology and design faculty, however, must approve the student’s selections.
  4. Approval of the material by - a member of the technology and design faculty must be obtained by the end of the semester prior to the one in which the student is required to present. The technology and design faculty member must also approve any subsequent changes the student wishes to make in his portfolio. (NOTE: These stipulations are for the student’s protection. They are designed to guarantee that the student allows sufficient time for preparation and to insure that the materials he or she selects is appropriate.)
  5. Preparation of the qualifying material is solely the responsibility of the student.
  6. The B.F.A. Technology interview will be held the first semester of each year. Should a student’s qualifying interview and portfolio presentation be deemed unsatisfactory, he/she will be required to repeat it the following semester. The Theatre Arts Program Director will assign a new date. A member of the technology and design faculty must approve any changes in the qualifying material.
  7. The comments and opinions of the student’s adjudicators will be collected by his/her academic advisor and communicated orally to the student within one week after his/her interview and presentation of portfolio. In the event of an unsatisfactory rating, a written explanation will be given to the student.

PROGRESS EVALUATION

The faculty during jury will evaluate each student at the end of each academic year. Evaluation is based on observation of production activities (quality and quantity) and on academic progress toward the degree. Recommendations resulting from the evaluation will be reported to the student by his/her academic advisor.

INTERVIEWS

All technology students are required to interview for all main stage production positions and for the Richard B. Harrison Players, the department’s varsity organization. Each student is also required to make a professional interview at two or more of the following: the North Carolina Theatre Conference, Southeastern Theatre Conference, University Resident Theatre Conference, the United States Institute of Theatre Technology, M.F.A. Design/Technology Programs, Local, Regional or National Professional Theatre Companies.

PRODUCTION ASSIGNMENT

Each student must serve as a member of the (1) running crew, (2) stage manager or assistant stage manager, (3) assistant technical director, or assistant designer for at least one major departmental production or Studio production. This requirement must be met at some point during the student’s first six semesters of residency. Evidence of its completion must be furnished in writing by the student to the Theatre Arts program director.

SENIOR THESIS PROJECT

The Technology student’s degree program culminates with a final production project supervised by a faculty member in the technology area. The production is the student’s final demonstration of his/her craft proficiency and, as such, is a project the student should begin planning as early as possible in his residency.

To ensure protection of the student’s interests and to provide a reasonable guarantee that a project of the highest quality will result, the Theatre program has adopted specific procedures for the selection, preparation, and execution of the Senior thesis project. This information is listed in detail in the Theatre Arts Student Handbook.

ACCREDITATION

Accredited by the National Association of Schools of Theatre (NAST) since 1988.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN THEATRE

THEA 210. Acting for Non-Theatre Majors Credit 3(3-0)
This course will include an examination and analysis of the actor’s craft through improvisation, sensitivity exercises, sense of emotional memory, and other exercises. These are used in order to free the student’s mind and body for the work of creating the playwright’s world. (F;S)

THEA 211. Acting I Credit 3(2-2)
This course will emphasize acting as organic interrelationship of self and environment. Students will learn to release individuality through improvisational exercises in relaxation and physical freedom, along with observation research, justification of action, objectives, talking and listening, inner focus through senses, all focusing on the Stanislavski Method, and on Dialogue and Text. Culminating projects under faculty supervision will be given. Theatre majors only. (F)

THEA 212. Acting II Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a continuation of Acting I with concentration on working on a role; breakdown of text into actions, objectives, beats; sensory work and its application to script. Students will learn developing and sustaining characters and action in increasingly complex texts. Rehearsals and performance of scenes and one-act plays with faculty and student directors will be emphasized. Prerequisite: THEA 211 or consent of the instructor. (S)

THEA 214. Theatre Movement I Credit 2(1-2)
This course is an introduction to the development of an expressive body. Emphasis will be placed on entering energy flow, harmonious alignment, Yoga exercises, Alexander technique, modern dance and ballet to achieve flexible, free, strong, and restfully alert body. Students will develop imaginative resources and sense of form through structures of improvisation in space. Theatre majors only. (F)

THEA 215. Theatre Movement II Credit 2(1-2)
The focus of this course will be on movement and breathing to increase range in body and voice, along with some dance techniques and styles. Concepts in weight, space, time, and flow; improvisations; and movement using imagination and forms found in music and dance composition will be emphasized. Prerequisite: THEA 214 or the consent of the instructor. (S)

THEA 231. Elements of Play Production Credit 3(2-2)
Study and application of the basic principles of all phases of theatre production and design as they relate to practical experiences in acting, directing, lighting, scenery design, and construction will be emphasized. Laboratory hours and audience attendance are required. (F)

THEA 241. Stagecraft Credit 3(2-2)
This course will consist of the study of basic principles of physical theatre, evolution of modern stages, building scenery and properties, lighting, makeup, and front-of-house practices. Working on crews and lab hours are required. (S)

THEA 317. Stage Voice I (Formerly THEA 217) Credit 3(1-4)
This course is an introduction to the mechanics of voice for the stage. Special attention will be given in good stage diction, articulation, voice projection, and speaking effectively with non-regional dialect. The student will be introduced to the International Phonetics Association language. (F)

THEA 318. Stage Voice II (Formerly THEA 218) Credit 3(1-4)
Stage Voice II is a continuation of Stage Voice I (THEA 317). Students will improve their stage diction, articulation, and voice projection, while strengthening their comprehensive knowledge of the vocal mechanism. Further exploration and usage of the International Phonetics Association language and its application the use of dialects will be examined in the course. Prerequisite: THEA 317 or the consent of the instructor. (S)

THEA 345. Drafting for the Theatre (Formerly THEA 245) Credit 3(2-2)
Students will receive intensive instruction in the techniques of theatrical drafting, in areas of scenery, lighting, and sound. Prerequisite: THEA 241 or the consent of the instructor. (F)

THEA 346. Computer-Aided Design for Theatre (Formerly THEA 246) Credit 3(2-2)
This course will offer students techniques of computer-aided design and drafting. Attention will be given to scenic, lighting, and costume designs. Prerequisite: THEA 345 or the consent of the instructor. (S)

THEA 360. Introduction to Drama and Theatre (Formerly THEA 260) Credit 3(3-0)
This is an introduction to the study of drama and theatre, including playwriting, directing, acting, design, and technical theatre. No experience in dramatic production is required. There will be lecture discussions, performances, demonstrations, films, tapes and guest appearances. (F;S)

THEA 401. Theatre Production Lab (Formerly THEA 300) Credit 1(0-2)
Students will work in various capacities for productions, including scenery, sound, special effects, property, lighting, costume, publicity, house, and/or makeup. Must be repeated for a maximum of three (3) credit hours. (F;S)

THEA 415. Acting III (Formerly THEA 311) Credit 3(3-0)
Students will gain experience in the application of the Stanislavski techniques to define and fulfill the actor’s work in terms of form and content as required by the play and its performance. Examination of the special demands of auditioning and cold readings; development of portfolios and actor’s prompt script books are required. Course fee required. Prerequisite: THEA 212. (F)

THEA 416. Acting IV (Formerly THEA 312) Credit 3(3-0)
Students will learn creating and sustaining character and action in texts since 1900. Emphasis will be on organic interrelation of acting, speech, and movement in scene study. Actor explores deeply the demands made by form and content of each script. Prerequisite: THEA 415. (S)

THEA 422. Directing I (Formerly THEA 321) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a practical beginning study of theories, practices, and techniques of play direction. Attention is given to the principles of analysis and research of casting and rehearsing. Exercises, lectures, and demonstrations will be used. Final project will be a scene or one-act play. (F)

THEA 431. Advanced Play Production (Formerly THEA 331) Credit 3(3-1)
Students will study specific theoretical and practical work in the methods of play production, along with detailed script analysis. Work on crew required. Prerequisite: THEA 231. (S)

THEA 445. Stage Lighting (Formerly THEA 342) Credit 3(3-1)
This is a beginning course in stage lighting that emphasizes the practical aspects of electricity, optics, color, psychology of light, position, control, distribution, and timing. Working on crews is required. (S)

THEA 456. Makeup for the Performing Arts (Formerly THEA 356) Credit 2(0-4)
The student will receive intensive study in the fundamental principles and practices of makeup for stage and media. This course provides drawing and face-painting skills, as well as, practices in the uses of cosmetics, wigs, and hairpieces. The student will work with departmental productions. (S)

THEA 464. History of the Theatre I (Formerly THEA 361) Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the interrelatedness of theatre’s technical, dramatic, and theoretical aspects in the development of the art form from its origins in the dance and ritual of preliterate cultures to the neoclassic France. (F)

THEA 465. History of the Theatre II (Formerly THEA 362) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of Theatre History I. Studies will be the development of technical, dramatic, and theoretical aspects of modern theatre from German Romanticism to the present. Periodic examinations and papers are required. Additionally, each student will research the intellectual, cultural and social background of a particular play or performance style and will apply that research in a performance project. (S)

THEA 466. Playwriting (Formerly THEA 363) Credit 3(3-0)
This course studies the process of creating a play, including plot development, structure, characterization, and dialogue. Students will write a one-act play, which will receive a stage reading at the end of the course. (S)

THEA 467. African American Drama I (Formerly THEA 364) Credit 3(3-0)
This course will study the history and criticism of African American drama and theatre from William A. Brown in 1821 to Lorraine Hansberry. The schools, periods, classes, subclasses, and types of drama will be analyzed. (F)

THEA 468. African American Drama II (Formerly THEA 365) Credit 3(3-0)
This is a continuation of African American Drama I. Course will study the history and criticism of African American drama and theatre from Lorraine Hansberry to the present. The schools, periods, classes, subclasses, and types of drama will be analyzed. (S)

THEA 469. Modern American Drama (Formerly THEA 366) Credit 3(3-0)
This is the study of the major currents in dramatic writing since 1900 in the U.S. as they reflect changes in society, audience, and literary form.

THEA 511. Acting Styles (Formerly THEA 411) Credit 3(3-0)
The student will have a review of historic theatrical styles, including Greek, Shakespeare, Restoration, comedy of manners, and modern. Class projects will focus on work in two styles, one classical, the other contemporary. Movement, voice, and speech, integrated directly with acting concerns in studio instruction and coaching, will be emphasized. Final acting project is required. Prerequisite: THEA 416. (F)

THEA 512. Acting Projects (Formerly THEA 412) Credit 3(3-0)
The student will prepare and perform an individual role of some length and complexity. Individual problems of actors will be emphasized, along with detailed critiques of roles. Prerequisite: THEA 511. (S)

THEA 513. Acting for the Camera (Formerly THEA 413) Credit 3(1-4)
This course will provide practical experience in camera techniques for actors, utilizing commercial, film, and television scripts. Students will work directly with agents and casting directors, allowing them the necessary exposure to marketing the actor for work in the film industry. Prerequisite: THEA 416. (S)

THEA 521. Directing II (Formerly THEA 421) Credit 3(3-0)
The student will study the development of an approach to conceiving a theatre production, including the definition of people, situations, ideas, and action-flow inherent in a script. Also studied will be the identification of form and structure from director’s point of view, along with the fundamental considerations in physical staging. The final directing project is a full-length play. Prerequisites: THEA 422 and 584. (S)

THEA 542. Sound Design for the Theatre (Formerly THEA 442) Credit 3(2-2)
This course is an in-depth study of uses of mixing boards, amplifiers, microphones, and recording devices for the Performing Arts. Prerequisite: THEA 241 or consent of the instructor. (S)

THEA 543. Scene Design (Formerly THEA 443) Credit 3(3-0)
The student will study the fundamentals of set design theory; basic mechanical and conceptual solutions for a variety of theatre spaces; and the development of presentational and research skills. (S)

THEA 550. History of Costume and Décor (Formerly THEA 450) Credit 3(3-0)
This course will examine the styles of costuming, architecture, furnishing, and ornamentation. Students will be exposed to highlights from ancient Egyptian to the present, with emphases on research and development. Prerequisite: THEA 241 or consent of the instructor. (F)

THEA 552. Costume Design  (Formerly THEA 452) Credit 3(2-2)
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of watercolor, chalk, ink, and charcoal mediums; also studied will be costume design and an extensive range of visual, written, and verbal techniques that comprise play analysis and the design-team collaboration. Prerequisite: THEA 550. (F)

THEA 553. Advanced Costume Design (Formerly THEA 453) Credit 3(2-2)
This course is for advanced costume-design students. It emphasizes multi-character and highly complex methods and technologies. There will be continual development of script analyses, styles, research techniques, and rendering skills. Prerequisite: THEA 552. (S)

THEA 561. Creative Dramatics (Formerly THEA 461) Credit 3(3-0)
Students will have an introduction to creative drama through improvisational theatre techniques. Emphasis will be on movement, voice, ensemble, and teaching strategies. Students will learn to use these activities in schools and community centers and with elderly and special-needs populations.

THEA 562. Children’s Theatre (Formerly THEA 462) Credit 3(3-0)
Various techniques used in producing children’s theatre with adult actors in school and community settings will be studied. Experience in design, lighting, costuming, acting, and promotion will be gained. Class work and participation in A Children’s Theatre Production are required.

THEA 563. Theatre Projects (Formerly THEA 463) Credit 3(3-0)
This course is for advanced individuals interested in specialized, concentrated research or production project. Project will be selected by students in collaboration with the instructor. Comprehensive exam is to be taken. Thesis is to be written or project presented. (F)

THEA 571. Theatre Internship (Formerly THEA 471) Credit 3(0-6)
This course is designed to provide the student with a collaborative field experience in the profession. These experiences might or might not be salaried positions in a professional theatre or arts administration company. The student must be a participating performer, manager, or designer/technician. May be repeated for credit.

THEA 572. Independent Study (Formerly THEA 472) Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides opportunities for the individual student to study in a specific area of theatrical production. Establishment of an independent study requires approval of the student’s advisor and the study-supervisor prior to registration. May be repeated for credit. (F;S;SS)

THEA 584. Stage Management (Formerly THEA 484) Credit 3(2-2)
This is the study of the functions and responsibilities of stage managing, including the development of prompt scripts, union (or company) rules, handling of auditions and rehearsals, and the calling of the productions. (S)

THEA 585. Theatre Management (Formerly THEA 485) Credit 3(3-0)
This is a study of theatre organizing and producing. This course will emphasize the analysis of the principles and methods of finances, box office, promotion, and house management. (F)

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Donna Baldwin-Bradby
Visiting Assistant Professor
B.F.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.F.A., Virginia Polytechnic University

Sonya Bennett-Brown
Adjunct Lecturer
B.M., Salem College for Women; M.M., North Carolina School of the Arts

Frankie Day
Professor, Theatre Arts Program Director and Executive Director of The Paul Robeson Theatre
B.A.., South Carolina State College; M.F.A., Southern Illinois University (Carbondale)

Gregory Horton
Associate Professor
B.S., North Carolina Central University; M.F.A., Michigan State University

Ray Collins
Adjunct Assistant Professor
LAMDA; M.F.A. University of New York

Stephen Hyers
Adjunct Assistant Professor
B.A., Carson-Newman College; M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Deborah Kintzing
Adjunct Assistant Professor
B.A., University of Tennessee; M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Tina Yarborough Liggins
Adjunct Assistant Professor
B.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.F.A., Virginia Polytechnic University

Miller Lucky, Jr.
Associate Professor
B.F.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.F.A., University of Florida (Gainesville)

Jeffrey Richardson
Associate Professor
B.A., Morgan State University; M.F.A., Purdue University

Vanita V. Vactor
Associate Professor
B.A., Hiram College; M.A., Western Illinois University; Ph.D., New York University