Department of Liberal Studies

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/cas/academic-departments/liberal-studies/index.html

Regina Williams, Interim Chairperson

OBJECTIVES

The Department of Liberal Studies (and Foreign Languages) offers interdisciplinary degrees designed to prepare students for employment, civic participation and life-long learning in a complex, global environment. A Liberal Studies Bachelor of Arts degree requires students to complete 124-125 semester hours in designated areas of competency including 24 hours of Concentration Studies, 6 hours of Related Electives and a Senior Research Project. The program seeks to provide students with a solid liberal arts education. The degree affords students a breath of academic experience as well as depth in a particular concentration field. The broad-based interdisciplinary nature of Liberal Studies provides the knowledge base and the communication and analytical skills appropriate for graduate work, entrepreneurial endeavors and numerous careers and occupations in the public and private sectors of the economy. Currently, the Department of Liberal Studies (and Foreign Languages) offers concentration options in African-American Studies, Cultural Change and Social Development, Dance, International Studies, Pre-Law,  Race, Class and Culture, Women’s Studies and the customized Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration. The Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration option allows students to tailor a degree that meets their educational and career goals and is especially helpful to non-traditional students who are returning to college after a break for family or career pursuits.

DEGREES OFFERED

Liberal Studies (African American Studies) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Liberal Studies (Cultural Change and Social Development) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Liberal Studies (Dance) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Liberal Studies (International Studies) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Liberal Studies (Pre-Law) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Liberal Studies (Race, Class and Culture) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Liberal Studies (Women’s Studies) – Bachelor of Arts (Curriculum Guide)
Liberal Studies (Interdisciplinary Studies) – Bachelor of Arts

MINORS OFFERED

French
Spanish

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The admission of students to the Liberal Studies undergraduate degree program is based upon general admission requirements of the University. Transfer into the Liberal Studies Program requires a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average. A minimum grade of a “C” is required for all concentration, related electives, LIBS 200 (Introduction to Liberal Studies, LIBS 300 (Research Methods) and LIBS 449 (the required Senior Research Project), and six to twelve semester hours of courses required by the specific concentration.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE PLACEMENT EXAMINATION

A foreign language placement examination will be administered to entering freshmen whose programs have a language requirement and who have taken at least two consecutive years of the same foreign language in high school. The placement test is web-based an can be accessed at: http://webcape.byuhtrsc.org/?acct=ncat. Students will need a Banner ID for taking the test. The highest level in which a student can be placed is the Intermediate II. A student cannot satisfy a language requirement by taking this examination. The foreign language placement examination will be given in order to place students in the appropriate levels only.

MINORS IN FRENCH AND SPANISH

A minor may be achieved in French or Spanish by students who complete a minimum of 18 semester hours in French or Spanish.

MINOR IN FRENCH

Students must successfully complete eighteen (18) semester hours in French courses. A minimum of twelve (12) of the eighteen semester hours must be in courses at the 200-level or above. A student must complete at least twenty-four (24) academic credit hours before declaring a minor, and must have a GPA of 2.0. A student may not have more than two minors. The minor will be printed on the student’s transcript but not on the student’s diploma.

Recommended Course Sequence

FREN 101 FREN 102 FREN 201
FREN 201 FREN 304 FRENCH elective

MINOR IN SPANISH

Students must successfully complete eighteen (18) semester hours in Spanish courses. A minimum of twelve (12) of the eighteen semester hours must be in courses at the 200-level or above. A student must complete at least twenty-four (24) academic credit hours before declaring a minor, and must have a GPA of 2.0. A student may not have more than two minors. The minor will be printed on the student’s transcript but not on the student’s diploma.

Recommended Course Sequence

SPAN 101 SPAN 102 SPAN 201
SPAN 202 SPAN 301 SPAN 302
SPAN 303 SPAN 304 SPAN 305

STUDY ABROAD

The Department of Liberal Studies and Foreign Languages encourages all students to study abroad. The Office of International Programs, (336) 334-7104, provides opportunities for A&T students to study in over 100 countries around the world while earning academic credit towards graduation.

Culture courses: SPAN 451, SPAN 452, SPAN 453, SPAN 454, SPAN 455, SPAN 456, (SPAN 406, SPAN 501: Content must be cultural).

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN LIBERAL STUDIES

LIBS 200. Introduction to Liberal Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This is a course that provides students with broad knowledge and a strong comprehensive understanding of ethics and civil engagement; that exposes the interconnected relationships among the disciplines, society and humanity. This course surveys each concentration offered in the Liberal Studies Department.

LIBS 201. Introduction to Race, Class and Culture Credit 3(3-0)
This course explores the history and theories of race and class and their impact on culture.

LIBS 202. Introduction to African American Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide freshmen and sophomores with a critical understanding of the field of African-American studies. The course will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective, emphasizing critical thinking and communication skills.

LIBS 203. Introduction to Women’s Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide Women’s Studies concentrators with a critical understanding of the role of women in the U.S. and global economy, society and politics. It will emphasize critical thinking and communication skills through reading, writing and oral presentations.

LIBS 209. History, Literary Connections and Social Relevance of Hip-Hop Credit 3(3-0)
This course expands the course offerings of two existing LIBS Concentrations: African-American Studies and Race, Class and Culture. It draws from several disciplines within the Social Sciences and Humanities and contributes to students’ ability to critically analyze the interrelationships between popular culture and the large society.

LIBS 220. Race, Class and Environmental Quality Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the relationships between race, class and environmental quality within the context of a global economy that seeks to maximize profits while minimizing responsibility. It also examines the concept of environmental justice as a means to restore positive connections within communities between environmental use and environmental quality.

LIBS 221. Genetics, Race and Society Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the historical development of theories of “race” in the Western world. It provides the student with a basic understanding of the principles of evolutionary/population biology, genetics, and taxonomy as they relate to biological and social conceptions of race.

LIBS 223. African-American Culture Through Sports Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines how sports have historically formed and currently shape the contours of African-American culture. Particular attention is given to such questions as the ethical dimension of segregation, the locus of gender equity, cultural images, and their potential effects for African-American athletes and the African-American community.

LIBS 225. Race, Crime and Social Injustice Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines how social structure impacts the race-crime relationship in terms of theory, policy and practice. It explores the phenomenon from multiple perspectives, including those involved in the criminal justice process. Students are encouraged to think critically about the social construction of race and social class in crime and crime control.

LIBS 227. Race, Class and Culture in South Africa Credit 3(3-0)
This course acquaints students with the economic, social, political and cultural forces that have shaped contemporary South Africa. It explores the role of race, class, gender and culture during the apartheid and post-apartheid eras.

LIBS 235. African-American Anti-Imperialism Credit 3(3-0)
This course addresses African-American political interventions and debates against European and U.S. colonialism and imperialism during the first three-quarters of the twentieth century. It also examines the parallel development of the U.S. civil rights movement and African-American support for African independence movements.

LIBS 236. Africana Thought and Practice Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines in depth a broad range of Black thought of scholars/activists, from W.E.B. DuBois and Marcus Garvey to Leopold Senghor and Frantz Fanon.

LIBS 241. Black Situation in TV Comedies Credit 3(3-0)
This course will provide students with the skills to critically analyze black situation comedies, from the 1950s to the present. The course will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective (literature, history, political science, sociology, law) and emphasize critical thinking and communication skills.

LIBS 301. Ethno-Nationalism and the Reconstruction of Nations Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines how the breakup of the USSR led to the rise of ethno-nationalism in the process of national reconstruction. Exploring the myths, symbols and histories of those competing populations within the Soviet Union or its power, we discover a paradigm that applies to the wider postcolonial world as well.

LIBS 302. Media Analysis Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the shaping of information in popular media, with special emphasis on the creation of news. Examining institutional configurations and conglomeration, it focuses on the role of news media within national discourses, on the shaping of ideological consensus and the marginalization of dissent. It asks questions about the limitations of political discourse, about bias and objectivity, about how news is defined, presented, and disseminated.

LIBS 303. Consumer Culture Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the creation of consumer culture during the last two centuries. It looks at the development of advertising, public relations, mass marketing, and the construction of consumer consciousness. It also considers the consequences of global consumerism upon the environment, cultural tradition, human social relations and economic conditions.

LIBS 304. The American South Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines mythologies and realities of the American South: the antebellum period, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Civil Rights era, and the New South. It looks at how these historical moments have been written and rewritten, in academic and popular discourses, in response to racial beliefs and ideological needs. It considers the South as a geographical, social, and cultural entity and as an important element within the shaping of an American national mythos.

LIBS 305. Race and Class in Caribbean Culture Credit 3(3-0)
This course will examine the ethnic, racial and cultural diversity of the Caribbean, including the impact of foreign cultures on the area, and the export of its unique cultural forms to the global society.

LIBS 306. Gender and Technology Credit 3(3-0)
This course will explore technology’s interaction with the concept of gender and how gender is embodied in technologies, and conversely, how technologies shape societal notions of gender. Students will critically assess the gender relations produced in areas such as entertainment and games, work, identity, education, culture, globalism, race and ethnicity.

LIBS 307. Food and The Global Community Credit 3(3-0)
This course uses multidisciplinary perspectives to examine the connections between food and human life ways. Focusing on varied ethnic food traditions and people around the world, this course will explore 1) the interplay of class and gender in the preparation of food, 2) the role of political and economic power in the accessibility and distribution of food, and 3) the religious and cultural symbolism of eating.

LIBS 308. Historical, Social, and Cultural Perspectives of Technology Credit 3(3-0)
This course explores the interrelationships between the human race and technology, the range of determinism between the two, and the possible paths for technology and humans in the global world. Global perspectives -- including Eastern and western, Northern and Southern -- will be covered in the course.

LIBS 309. Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Extraordinary Violence Credits 3(3-0)
This course composes a critical study of the notion of "evil" by considering how the term has been employed historically to explain and sometimes justify radical violence such as genocide. It will consider the multi-disciplinary spectrum of theories that seek to explain how ordinary people come to participate in extraordinary acts of brutality and mass murder of their fellow human beings.

LIBS 311. The Idea of Africa Credits 3(3-0)
This course will provide students with the skills to critically analyze the way Africa has been portrayed historically in the West, in fiction, the academy, books, magazines, film, television and other popular media. The development of critical thinking skills in written and oral communication are at the core of this course which asks students to rethink common assumptions, perceptions and stereotypes.

LIBS 312. Gender and Development in Africa Credits 3(3-0)
This course examines women's roles in African economies, the gendered nature of legal rights under customary law, political participation, female genital mutilation, and the impact of conflict, war, genocide and the HIV/AIDS pandemic on African women.

LIBS 320. Doing Culture Credits 3(3-0)
This course examines the significance of culture in human societies. It assumes that culture is more than the objects of cultural production. The course explores how culture is the continual construction and reconstruction of social, economic and political institutions.

LIBS 401. War and Culture Credit 3(3-0)
This course investigates the nature of war, its causes and consequences, its depiction in news accounts, memoirs, literary texts, and popular media. This course asks questions about the function of war economically and ideologically. It considers the intersection of war with race and gender. It also considers the ways war is commonly represented within national discourses.

LIBS 402. Historical Memory Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the nature of historical truth within a mass-mediated culture and against a prevailing postmodern skepticism. It also looks at the processes by which historical events are defined and represented. It asks questions about the intersections of nationalism and history, about the determining power of school curricula, textbooks, museums, academic experts, and popular media.

LIBS 501. Reading and Writing Cultural Critiques Credit 3(3-0)
This writing intensive course emphasizes both critical analysis and writing, with particular attention on writing for a specific setting and audience.

LIBS 601. Independent Study I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed for students to conduct advanced research and study on a special topic.

LIBS 602. Independent Study II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed for students to conduct advanced research and study on a special topic. Prerequisite: LIBS 601.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES

FRENCH

FREN 101. Elementary French I* Credit 3(3-0)
This is a course for beginners which emphasizes the four language skills-listening, speaking, reading, and writing. (F;S)

FREN 102. Elementary French II* Credit 3(3-0)
This is a continuation of FOLA 100 with further emphasis placed on the oral-aural approach. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or equivalent. (F;S)

FREN 201. Intermediate French I* Credit 3(3-0)
This course consists of a brief review of pronunciation. Grammar is stressed with emphasis on cultural readings. Prerequisites: FREN 101 and 102, or two units of high school French. (F)

FREN 202. Intermediate French II* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of FREN 201. Stress is placed on grammar, cultural reading and conversation. Prerequisite: FREN 201 or equivalent. (S)

FREN 301. French Composition Credit 3(3-0)
This intensive review focuses on refining, through written expression, the grammar structures learned in previous courses. The course will prepare students for formal, academic writing, while expanding their vocabulary and polishing their style. It is conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 202. (F;S)

FREN 302. French Grammar I Credit 3(3-0)
An intensive study of French grammar, this course pays particular attention to the more challenging structures of the French verb system, such as the perfect and the imperfect, the subjunctive, and the sequence of tenses in multiple-clause constructions. It is conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 201. (F;S)

FREN 303. French Grammar II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of FREN 302. French Grammar I. Among  the topics examined are: the passive voice, impersonal constructions, relative clauses, adverbial clauses, and uses or por and para. It is conducted in French. Prerequisites: FREN 302 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

FREN 304. Phonetics Credit 3(3-0)
This is a course in French sounds and diction. It is required of all students majoring and minoring in French, and recommended for those who wish to improve pronunciation. Prerequisites:FREN 201 and 202. (F;S)

FREN 305. Intermediate French Conversation Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides practice in oral French, focusing principally on the real-life contexts of social, commercial and workplace settings. In addition, practice is provided in discussing topics of current interest, using national and international media as springboards for conversation. The course is conducted in French. It may be taken simultaneously with FREN 202. Prerequisites: FREN 201-202 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

FREN 306. Advanced French Conversation Credit 3(3-0)
This course offers students intensive training in self-expression and an opportunity to improve pronunciation, diction, reading and speaking. Prerequisite: FREN 305. (F;S)

FREN 400. Introduction to Literary Analysis Credit 3(3-0)
This course teaches the basic techniques of literary analysis, as well as the terminology and concepts used in understanding a variety of literary genres. Students will read both Caribbean and Afro-French texts. It is conducted in French. Prerequisites: FREN 202 and FREN 301. (F;S)

FREN 401. Afro-French Expression Credit 3(3-0)
The course is designed to provide the student with a general knowledge of Afro-French literature in its many manifestations throughout Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Representative texts will be read within the context of the socio-historic and cultural influences that have shaped the black experience in Francophone Africa. The course is conducted in French. (F;S)

FREN 402. Survey of French Literature I - The Middle Ages through the Enlightenment Credit 3(3-0)
A study of representative works and literary movements in French literature from the Middle Ages through the Enlightenment. Students will learn to use the methods and language of literary analysis. Prerequisite: FREN 400. (F;S)

FREN 403. Survey of French Literature II - Romanticism through the New Novel Credit 3(3-0)
A study of representative works and literary movements in French literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will learn to use the methods and language of literary analysis. Prerequisite: FREN 400 and FREN 402 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

FREN 404. French Civilization Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a general survey of the history of France, with emphasis on the social, political and economic development designed to give students an understanding of present conditions and events. A detailed study of such French institutions as art, music, and education is included. This course is also offered in conjunction with reports of collateral readings. (F;S)

FREN 406. Special Topics Credit 3(3-0)
Selected topics in French. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: FREN 400. (F;S)

FREN 452. Introduction to Business French Credit 3(3-0)
This course will enhance the student’s ability to communicate in a multilingual environment. It will equip students with the necessary tools to conduct international business transactions. The course is conducted in French. Prerequisites: FREN 201 and 202. (F;S)

FREN 453. Advanced French for Business Credit 3(3-0)
This course completes FREN 452, instructing students in more advanced vocabulary and grammar, as well as offering further practice employing French in a business context. The course is conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 452.

FREN 456.  French Studies Abroad Credit 3(3-0)
Primarily intended for transfer credit earned abroad in courses on French language, civilization, or culture. 1-16 credits per semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (F;S)

FREN 457. French Conversation and Phonetics Credit 3(3-0)
This course completes FREN 305, Intermediate French Conversation. Current techniques and their uses in attaining mastery in oral French. Prerequisites: FREN 305 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

FREN 501. Independent Study in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes independent study and research in a special area of the foreign language. Prerequisites: FREN 201 or 304. (F;S)

FREN 502. Seminar in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes discussion of readings and special topics in French. Presentations from students, faculty and guest lecturers will supplement the discussion. Prerequisites: FREN 202 or 304. (F;S)

FREN 503. Structural Linguistics in the Teaching of French Credit 3(3-0)
This course applies structural linguistic forms, doctrine and methodology to the teaching of French historical development of the French language. Presentation of dialogues and drills in French will be included. Emphasis is on phonemics, morphology and syntax. (F;S)

FREN 504. Selected Tales, Legends and Proverbs on Francophone Africa Credit 3(3-0)
This course on the Francophone tales of Africa will introduce the student to African culture and oral literary thoughts. Based on the analysis of these tales and proverbs, students will gain a better understanding of the African family structure and social organization. The course is conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 305. (F;S)

FREN 505. Selected Poetry and Prose from Francophone Writers of Central Africa Credit 3(3-0)
The study of poetry and prose from francophone writers of Central Africa is an advanced francophone course. Its goal is to give the students a solid knowledge through analysis of poetry and prose of African lyricism, politics, and philosophical themes. The course is conducted in French. Prerequisites: FREN 305 and 306. (F;S)

Advanced Undergraduate

FREN 604. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century Credit 3(3-0)
This course presents Classicism through masterpieces of Comeille, Racine, Moliere and other authors of the “Golden Period” in French letters. (F;S)

FREN 605. French Literature in the Eighteenth Century Credit 3(3-0)
This course presents the life and works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau as the main emphasis. (F;S)

FREN 606. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century Credit 3(3-0)
The great literary currents of the nineteenth century Romanticism and Realism will be studied. (F;S)

FREN 607. The French Theatre Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a thorough study of the French theatre from the Middle Ages to the present. (F;S)

FREN 608. The French Novel Credit 3(3-0)
The novel from the Seventeenth Century to the present will be studied. (F;S)

FREN 609. French Syntax Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to teach grammar on the advanced level. (F;S)

FREN 610. Contemporary French Literature Credit 3(3-0)
This course deals with the chief writers and literary currents from 1900 to the present. (F;S)

FREN 611. Selected Afro-French Poets Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study and analysis of the most representative works of Afro-French poets of South America, Africa and the Caribbean. Prerequisite: FREN 305, 306 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

*Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for this course.

SPANISH

SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish I* Credit 3(3-0)
This course for beginners focuses on the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will be asked to take the Spanish Placement Test. The course is conducted primarily in Spanish. (F;S;SS)

SPAN 102. Elementary Spanish II* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the continuation of SPAN 101. It continues practice in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will be asked to take the Spanish Placement Test. The course is conducted primarily in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or consent of instructor. (F;S;SS)

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a review of elementary Spanish and offers further study of vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Emphasis is placed on improving the four basic skills of language acquisition. Intermediate-level readings in literature and culture, as well as a service-learning component, complement the study of language. Students will be asked to take the Spanish Placement Test. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or consent of instructor. (F;S;SS)

SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II* Credit 3(3-0)
The sequel to SPAN 201, this course reviews and completes the basic study of Spanish grammar. Practice continues with the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Intermediate-level readings in literature and culture, as well as a service-learning component, complement the study of language. Students will be asked to take the Spanish Placement Test. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or consent of instructor. (F;S;SS)

SPAN 301. Spanish Composition Credit 3(3-0)
This intensive review focuses on refining, through written expression, the grammar structures learned in previous courses. The course will prepare students for formal, academic writing, while expanding their vocabulary and polishing their style. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. (F;S)

SPAN 302. Spanish Grammar I Credit 3(3-0)
An intensive study of Spanish grammar, this course pays particular attention to the more challenging structures of the Spanish verb system, such as the preterit and the imperfect, the subjunctive, and the sequence of tenses in multiple-clause constructions. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 201. (F;S)

SPAN 303. Spanish Grammar II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of SPAN 302, Spanish Grammar I. Among the topics examined are: The passive voice, impersonal constructions, relative clauses, adverbial clauses, and uses of por and para. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 302 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

SPAN 304. Spanish Phonetics Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes a systematic analysis of speech sounds, and the operation of phonetic laws of the Spanish language. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span 201 or consent of instructor.  (F;S)

SPAN 305. Intermediate Spanish Conversation Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides practice in oral Spanish, focusing principally on the real-life contexts of social, commercial, and workplace settings. In addition, practice is provided in discussing topics of current interest, using national and international media as springboards for conversation. The course is conducted in Spanish. It may be taken simultaneously with SPAN 202.Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

SPAN 400. Introduction to Literary Analysis Credit 3(3-0)
This course teaches the basic techniques of literary analysis, as well as the terminology and concepts used in understanding a variety of literary genres. Students will read both Latin American and Peninsular texts. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 and SPAN 301. (F;S)

SPAN 401. Afro-Hispanic Literature Credit 3(3-0)
The course is designed to provide the student with a general knowledge of Afro-Hispanic literature in its many manifestations throughout Spanish America and the Caribbean. Representative texts will be read within the context of the socio- historic and cultural influences that have shaped the black experience in Spanish America. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 400. (F;S)

SPAN 402. Survey of Latin American Literature I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an overview of early Latin American literature, beginning with the Pre-Columbian period and ending with the wars of independence. It covers literary texts from several genres and offers a sampling of Latin America’s complex and diverse cultures. The works of canonical and non-canonical writers will be studied through close readings of the texts and the application of literary analysis techniques. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 400. (F;S)

SPAN 403. Survey of Latin American Literature II Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers representative texts from a variety of genres. Beginning with the modernista movement and ending at the present day, it examines the Latin American “Boom,” Latino writers in the U.S., and testimonial literature, among others. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 400, and SPAN 402 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

SPAN 404. Survey of Spanish Literature I Credit 3(3-0)
This course studies the literature of Spain from the Cid through the Golden Age. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 400. (F;S)

SPAN 405. Survey of Spanish Literature II Credit 3(3-0)
A continuation of SPAN 404, this course focuses on the literature of Spain from the seventeenth century to the present. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 400. (F;S)

SPAN 406. Special Topics Credit 3(3-0)
Topics to be studied may include linguistics, cinema, and specific literary periods, genres, or figures. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 400. (F;S)

SPAN 451. Spanish and Latino Culture Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces students to the geography, history, literature, arts, and economics of the diverse peoples of Spain and the AmericAS. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

SPAN 452. Introduction to Spanish for Business Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to enhance the student’s ability to relate to a business environment in an increasingly important commercial language both nationally and internationally. It will introduce the student to the vocabulary and discourse related to business topics and functional areas as well as to the cultural setting of business. These topics will be interwoven with a grammar review taught in a business context. The course will be conducted in Spanish and will include some translating activities. Prerequisite: FOLA 321. (F;S)

SPAN 453. Advanced Spanish for Business Credit 3(3-0)
This course completes SPAN 452, instructing students in more advanced vocabulary and grammar, as well as offering further practice employing Spanish in a business context. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 452. (F;S)

SPAN 454. Introduction to Spanish for Health Care Professionals Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to enhance the student’s ability to succeed in a medical environment in which a facility with both English and Spanish is beneficial or required. SPAN 454 introduces students to vocabulary and modes of discourse related to the health care profession, as well as to a variety of health care settings. The course will be conducted in Spanish and will include grammar review and translation activities. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. (F;S)

SPAN 455. Advanced Spanish for Health Care Professionals Credit 3(3-0)
This course completes SPAN 454, instructing students in more advanced vocabulary and grammar, as well as offering further practice employing Spanish in a health care context. It is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 454. (F;S)

SPAN 456. Americanos:  Latino Culture in the United States Credit 3(3-0)
This course studies different topics affecting Hispanic-Americans in the United States, like reasons for emigrating, U.S. immigration policy, assimilation, discrimination, affirmative action, bilingual education, alliance and conflict with African Americans in political and economic arenas, etc. The class will be conducted in Spanish, with an emphasis on discussion and composition. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

SPAN 501. Independent Study in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes independent study and research in a special area of the foreign language. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or FOLA 300. (F;S)

SPAN 502. Seminar in Foreign Languages Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes discussion of readings and special topics in French and Spanish. Presentations from students, faculty and guest lecturers will supplement the discussion. Papers employing research techniques in literary studies are required of all candidates for a degree with concentrations within the Foreign Languages Department. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or FOLA 300. (F;S)

GERMAN

FOLA 102. Elementary German I Credit 3(3-0)
The fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar will be studied. Attention is given to prepared and sight translations and vocabulary building. (F;S)

FOLA 103. Elementary German II* Credit 3(3-0)
This course continues the emphasis on grammar, vocabulary building, prepared and sight translations. Maximum attention given to graded readings in German prose and drama. (F;S)

FOLA 202. German Readings in the Natural Social Sciences and Technical Field Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes individualized readings in the natural, social sciences and technical fields for students desirous of developing competency in German. (F;S)

FOLA 204. Introduction to Business German Credit 3(3-0)
This course will introduce students to the German language of everyday business dealings. Emphasis will be placed on those aspects that have an impact on the average citizen such as daily business dealings, social and environmental problems, and the dependence of the population on international trade. Prerequisites: FOLA 102 and 103. (F;S)

FOLA 420. Conversational German Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes intensive practice in everyday German. Prerequisite: German 102, 103, or approval of instructor. (F;S)

FOLA 422. Intermediate German I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is open to students who have completed German 102 and 103. The students read a cross-section of the simpler writings in German literature and German newspapers. (F;S)

FOLA 423. Intermediate German II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of FOLA 422. Readings from German literature are included. (F;S)

FOLA 424. Afro-German Studies Credit 3(3-0)
Afro-German Studies will explore and discuss manuscripts either written by or written about Africans living in Germany and manuscripts written about or by Germans living in Africa. The manuscripts will be older and written in the older German script: some of the manuscripts will be current and modern. Prerequisites: FOLA 422 and 423. (F;S)

FOLA 427. Survey of German Literature Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides general introduction to the study of German literature. It is intended to give an overall picture of German literature and an opportunity to read outstanding works not offered in other German courses. (F;S)

RUSSIAN

FOLA 106. Elementary Russian I* Credit 3(3-0)
This is an elementary course for beginners which consists of grammar translation, practice in pronunciation and limited use of the spoken language. (F;S)

FOLA 107. Elementary Russian II* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of Elementary Russian 106. Attention is given to more advanced grammar. Reading in Russian is stressed. Prerequisite: FOLA 106. (F;S)

FOLA 310. Literature of American Communism and Soviet Russia Credit 3(3-0)
This course surveys literature of communism from the depression era through present day in the United States and literature of Soviet Russia. Course materials will focus on autobiographies of the period, with an emphasis upon the black experience with communism in both the United States and Soviet Russia. The course is designed to give students a broader cultural understanding of how Americans and Russians view one another. The course is taught in translation. (F;S)

FOLA 311. Technical Russian Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to teach basic reading and translation skills as well as vocabulary building, with an emphasis on the sciences/engineering. Course readings will be selected based on enrolled students’ majors. The course is taught in translation. Prerequisites: FOLA 106 and 107. (F;S)

FOLA 322. Intermediate Russian I Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of basic Russian grammar. There is emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: FOLA 107. (F;S)

FOLA 323. Intermediate Russian II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of Intermediate Russian I. Students will analyze well-known Russian works in order to develop a competency in Russian. Emphasis will also be placed on conversation and composition. Prerequisite: FOLA 322. (F;S)

JAPANESE

FOLA 108. Elementary Japanese I* Credit 3(3-0)
This is an elementary course for beginners, which consists of practice in pronunciation and usage of the spoken language. This course is designed to offer the basic foundation for the development of listening comprehension and speaking skills, and also provides an introduction into the Japanese culture. (F;S)

FOLA 109. Elementary Japanese II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of Elementary Japanese I. The focus will be to examine the elementary Japanese alphabet called Hiragana through reading and writing. Prerequisite: FOLA 108. (F;S)

FOLA 308. Intermediate Japanese I Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on development of conversational skills, with practice of reading skills and Japanese characters. Speaking and listening practice will be aided through the usage of videotapes and other media. (F;S)

FOLA 309. Intermediate Japanese II* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of FOLA 308. In addition to practice to improve oral proficiency, this course will reinforce reading and writing skills, with emphasis on composition and oral presentation. (F;S)

PORTUGUESE

FOLA 110. Elementary Portuguese I* Credit 3(3-0)
This is a course for beginners, which emphasizes the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course is conducted in Portuguese. (F;S)

FOLA 111. Elementary Portuguese II* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of Elementary Portuguese I and introduces students to more advanced grammar. There is emphasis on improving the four skills taught in Elementary Portuguese I. The course is taught in Portuguese. (F;S)

FOLA 314. Intermediate Portuguese I* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation from Elementary Portuguese II. There is a review of grammar and introduction to more advanced grammar. The course places an emphasis on improving the skills taught in Elementary Portuguese II. The course is taught in Portuguese, and students begin reading essays and short stories in Portuguese. (F;S)

FOLA 315. Intermediate Portuguese II* Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of Intermediate Portuguese I. There are reviews and completion of Portuguese grammar. The course places an emphasis on improving the four skills of reading, listening, speaking, and writing. Students will also read short stories and essays. The course is conducted in Portuguese. (F;S)

*Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for these courses.

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

José Alberto Bravo de Rueda
Associate Professor
B.A., Pontificia Universidad Católica; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland – College Park

Luz Marina Beuchner
Lecturer
B.A. University Leon, Leon-Spain, M.A. Spanish

Stephen C. Ferguson
Associate Professor
B.A., University of Missouri; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas

Beverly Grier
Professor and Associate Dean
B.A., University of Michigan; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University

Wendy C. Hamblet
Professor
B.A., M.A., Brock University; M.A., Ph.D., Penn State University

John F. Humphrey
Associate Professor
B.A., Manchester College; M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research

Aaron West
Lecturer
B.A., University of Maryland, Baltimore County, M.A., North Carolina A&T State University

Regina Williams
Associate Professor and Interim Chairperson
B.A., Hampton University, M.HR. University of Oklahoma, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Greensboro