N.C. A&T
This is where learning happens.

This is where learning happens.

READ MORE

School of Nursing

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/son/index.html

Inez Tuck, Dean

The School of Nursing offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing (BSN), and there are three entry options to pursue this degree: traditional (generic prelicensure), accelerated second degree (ABSN prelicensure option) and a completion option for registered nurses (BSNC option). The traditional program has been in existence since 1953 when the School of Nursing was established. The accelerated option enrolled its first cohort of second degree students in January 2010. The option for registered nurses began in the mid-1990s and a revised curriculum was implemented with a new cohort of registered nurses in 2014.

DEGREES OFFERED

Nursing – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

PHILOSOPHY

The School of Nursing faculty, as members of the University community, share and extend its mission and core values. The School of Nursing supports the University vision of being “a learner-centered community that develops and preserves intellectual capital through interdisciplinary learning, discovery, engagement, and operational excellence.” We strive to achieve a diverse learning environment that values human dignity, integrity, and social justice, which are fundamental to the discipline of nursing.  We also believe that accountability, responsibility, and professionalism are required attributes of nursing professionals.

We consider professional nursing an art and a science. It is a changing, interactive, evidence-based, patient-centered practice discipline. The focus of the practice of the professional nurse includes the diagnosis and treatment of human responses to actual or potential health problems/life processes (ANA, Social Policy Statement, 2003, p.5). Nurses use the nursing process as a systematic approach to plan and implement safe, quality, patient-centered nursing care and to make clinical judgments in a variety of settings. We are committed to addressing health disparities by supporting and implementing research, training, education, and interventional programs that will improve the health of underserved and vulnerable populations.

We believe that health is a dynamic state of wholeness (mind-body-spirit) influenced by one’s cultural beliefs and personal circumstances. We believe that patients are active participants in their health care and nurses are collaborators in their decisions regarding heath promotion and illness prevention. We believe the nurse practices within a health are system that is diverse and that is constantly changing in response to advances in technology and health-promoting discoveries.

The School of Nursing addresses the health and nursing care needs of patients across the lifespan and in various health care environments. The nursing curriculum provides a foundation for nursing practice built on a body of knowledge derived from the humanities, arts, biological, physical and social sciences, and nursing. The program prepares individuals for professional nursing practice with the skills and knowledge necessary to expand their current practice and pursue graduate education and lifelong learning.

MISSION

The mission of the School of Nursing is to provide an environment of academic excellence in which to educate and prepare students to become professional nurses committed to lifelong learning, scholarly inquiry, civility and service which will enhance the health and wellness of diverse communities. We contribute to the body of nursing knowledge through scholarly activities and the dissemination of findings. We provide service to local, regional, state, national, and global communities by facilitating community engagement.

CORE VALUES

Faculty affirms the University values. The values of the institution are reinforced in classroom and clinical instruction, through the activities of the student nursing organizations, and in interactions between students and their academic faculty coaches. In addition, the faculty of the School of Nursing embrace the core values of accountability, responsibility, and professionalism. The core values of the University and the School of Nursing are expressed in the philosophy and mission statements and are reflected in program goals.

ORGANIZING FRAMEWORK

The Organizing Framework for the School of Nursing is:

  • Based on a foundation of general education knowledge
  • Dedicated to the acquisition and application of knowledge related to the science, art, and practice of nursing
  • Built on a progression from simple to complex concepts
  • Focused on client health needs across the lifespan
  • Grounded in evidence-based practice in a variety of health care environments

PROGRAM  GOALS

The School of Nursing offers undergraduate programs for traditional and second degree pre-licensure students, and a baccalaureate completion program for registered nurses. Competencies of the various programs are derived from the School of Nursing philosophy, mission and organizing framework.

The program goals of the School of Nursing are to:

  1. Educate students to become professional nurses prepared to enter the workforce and provide culturally appropriate safe, evidence-based care.
  2. Conduct research and scholarly activities that contribute to and advance nursing practice and health promotion.
  3. Contribute to the health of our local community, state, regional, national and global societies through our community engagement activities.
  4. Engage and participate in collaborative and interdisciplinary efforts to fulfill the mission of the University.

STUDENT OUTCOMES

At the end of the program the graduate will:

  1. Use the nursing process to provide patient centered care which is culturally appropriate within the context of families, communities, and global societies.
  2. Choose professional behaviors that encompass ethical reasoning, accountability, responsibility, civility, and integrity in the practice of nursing.
  3. Collaborate with members of the interprofessional health care team.
  4. Plan population specific nursing care that includes concepts of health promotion, disease and injury prevention across the lifespan.
  5. Use technology to retrieve evidence to inform the delivery of safe and effective nursing interventions.
  6. Demonstrate leadership ability by enlisting the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of essential nursing actions.
  7. Demonstrate the use of critical thinking and clinical judgment to provide evidenced-based patient-centered care.
  8. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication.
  9. Apply knowledge of patient safety and quality in professional nursing practice.

ROLE SPECIFIC GRADUATE COMPETENCIES

Embedded in these nine student learning outcomes are the following role-specific graduate competencies which are developed over time throughout the curriculum:

  • Nursing process
  • Patient-centered care
  • Culturally appropriate care
  • Ethical reasoning
  • Collaboration
  • Teamwork
  • Health promotion and injury prevention
  • Technology use
  • Safe and effective nursing interventions
  • Leadership
  • Critical thinking
  • Evidence-based care
  • Communication
  • Patient safety and quality.

The structure, content and processes of the curriculum for the traditional, ABSN and BSNC entry options all incorporate professional standards, guidelines, and competencies, including The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice) (AACN, 2008); The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN)’s Quality and Safety Competencies (2011), the ANA Standards of Professional Practice (2010), the American Nurses Association Nursing Scope  and Standards of Practice, and standards set by the North Carolina Board of Nursing.

ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS

The program offered by the School of Nursing is approved by the North Carolina Board of Nursing, 4516 Lake Boone Trail, Raleigh, NC 27607, (919) 782-3211, www.ncbon.com; email@ncbon.com. The School of Nursing is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc., (ACEN) 3343 Peachtree Road, NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, Georgia  30326, Telephone (404) 975-5000, http://www.acenursing.org/.

The School of Nursing is an agency member of the National League for Nursing (NLN), the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), Southern Regional Education Board Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing (SREB) and the Southern Nursing Research Society (SNRS). The School of Nursing has an affiliate chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society.

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The School of Nursing believes that the professional development of a nursing student is essential. A total of 124-125 credit hours are required for graduation with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. A minimum of 36 credit hours must be earned at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. The BSN program has a 1:1 ratio for theory classes, 1:2 ratio for laboratory classes and a 1:3 ratio for clinical practice experiences. Students are required to take nationally normed tests and comprehensive exams throughout the curriculum and to achieve satisfactory scores on such tests. Graduates of the  nursing program are eligible to apply to take the National Council of State Boards of Nursing Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

Students are required to attend Founder’s Day, Honors Convocation, Junior Recognition and Senior Pinning and Recognition Ceremonies, Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society activities such as research day and other events designated by the dean as related to the professional nature of nursing. Students are encouraged to participate in nationally affiliated student organizations and local and global service learning.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

The School of Nursing has more stringent criteria for admission than University policy.

1.    Admission Criteria for Pre-Nursing Majors (Lower Division)

  • Freshman admitted to the University must meet the following criteria to be eligible for admission into the pre-nursing major.

      -   Combined SAT of 930 (math and verbal)

      -   Cumulative high school GPA of 3.0 or higher

  • Students who transfer from other colleges and universities and are without a SAT score may be admitted to the University as a pre-nursing major if they have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher from all academic transcripts.  All transcripts will be evaluated and a cumulative GPA averaged across all programs. Grades of C or higher in nursing prerequisite courses are preferred. Students must complete Biology 100, Chemistry 104 and 114 and Biology 361 (Anatomy and Physiology) with a minimum grade of C or higher on the first attempt. Chemistry and Anatomy and Physiology cannot be more than 5 years old for transfer purposes and currency of content.
  • Freshman and transfer students who are not formally admitted to the University as pre-nursing majors must meet the following criteria to be eligible to change their majors to pre-nursing:

      -   Completion of the first three semesters of the nursing curriculum with a cumulative grade point average of 2.8 or higher on a 4 point scale. Grades transferred from all other institutions will be considered in the computation of the grade point average for transfer students.

      -   Attainment of a grade of C or higher in all courses.

      -   Students must complete BIOL 100, CHEM 104 and 114 and BIOL 361 (Anatomy and Physiology) with a minimum grade of C or higher on the first attempt.

2.    Admission to the Nursing Major

Admission to the University or the pre-nursing major does not guarantee acceptance to the nursing major in the pre-licensure entry options. Admission into the nursing major is competitive.  The transcripts of previous coursework at all institutions are evaluated and a cumulative GPA of all academic work is calculated. Competitive applicants to the pre-licensure entry options will have a grade of “C” or higher on all prerequisite courses on the first attempt.

       A.    Completion of physical and biological science courses with a grade of “C” or higher on the first attempt:
               BIOL 100 (4), CHEM 104 (3), CHEM 114 (1) LAB, BIOL 361 (4)

       B.    Completion of the following additional prerequisites with a grade of “C” or higher.
               MATH 101/111 (3/4)          Statistics (3)               ENGL 101 (3)
               ENGL 100 (3)                     FCS 260 (3)               MATH Logic/Analytical Reasoning (3)
               PSYC 320 (3)                     FCS 357 (3)               BIOL 220 (4)       
               Global Studies (3)              African American Studies (3)

       C.    Completion of the following prerequisite nursing course’s with a grade of “C” or better higher.
               NURS 100, NURS 226 (4), NURS 205 (3)

Students must meet all admission requirements for the entry option and the University and complete prerequisites prior to being admitted to the nursing major. Students enrolled in the nursing major must meet agency requirements for criminal background reviews and drug screenings as well as other requirements. Students must be physically and mentally capable to perform the tasks taught within the nursing discipline with minimal assistance.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, when accompanied by nursing licensure, prepares the graduate for beginning practice in a variety of health care settings and to pursue graduate education. Some possible employment settings include institutions such as hospitals, public health agencies, clinics, military services, travel nursing, home health, and extended care facilities.

POLICY CHANGE

Policies and procedures are subject to change and students will be notified of the changes no later than 30 days prior to their implementation. Changes will be communicated in orientation sessions/student meetings, e-mail and other electronic media, the School of Nursing Student Handbook, and University Bulletin and Policy Handbook. Students are expected to review annually the policies in the School of Nursing Student Handbook.

TRADITIONAL BSN ENTRY OPTION

Pre-nursing and transfer students are admitted to the upper division in the traditional entry option. Students progress through the curriculum as cohort groups. The first semester in the upper division is the summer which follows the sophomore year.

ACCELERATED ENTRY OPTION FOR SECOND (2ND) DEGREE STUDENTS

Students with a bachelor’s degree in another  discipline who wish to pursue nursing are eligible to apply for the accelerated entry option. The Accelerated Option is offered in course blocks, moves rapidly and students spend from 28-32 contact hours per week in classroom and clinical activities. The program is conducted over a 12-month period with 3 one-week breaks. Students must be committed to intense study and have support systems in place that allow for few distractions. Sixty four credits are required beyond the first bachelor’s degree.

BSN ENTRY COMPLETION OPTION GENERAL INFORMATION

The goal of the BSN Completion Option is to provide the registered nurse with an associate’s degree in nursing  an opportunity to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. The program is designed to graduate nurses who will function in a variety of clinical settings, provide leadership with managerial skills, apply research evidence, and be prepared for graduate nursing education. The program can be completed in 12 months of full-time study or 24 months part-time. There are 21 hours of prerequisite courses required prior to entering the nursing major. Previous knowledge and skills are validated by passing the NCLEX-RN examination and maintaining a current RN license. Students must be licensed and eligible to practice in the state of North Carolina prior to enrolling in the major.  A total of 124-125 semester hours of credit are required for graduation. A minimum of 36 credits must be earned at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN NURSING

The courses listed below are required, elective and/or general education courses taught by faculty in the School of Nursing and offered in the three entry options. Refer to the appropriate curriculum guide for the list of required courses.

NURS 100. Student Success I Credit 1(1-0)
This course is designed to facilitate transition to higher education early in an academic program of study. Students will explore a range of personal and professional strategies to achieve academic success and to cope effectively with the requirements of higher education. Prerequisites: Pre-Nursing Majors Only.

NURS 205. Pharmacology in Nursing Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the nurse’s role in medication administration and usage. The course will also increase the student’s knowledge of categories of medications and their effects upon various populations. It will enable the student to determine and evaluate the educational and patient care goals regarding medication administration. The student will learn to use information technology to stay current with new drugs and collaborate with interdisciplinary teams to ensure quality patient-centered care. Corequisites: NURS 226.

NURS 226. Introduction to Professional Nursing Credit 4(4-0)
This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of professional, evidenced-based nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on concepts relevant to nursing care in a rapidly changing health care environment. The essential qualities of nursing as a profession are explored. Prerequisites: BIOL 361, FCS 260, PSYC 320.

NURS 258. Introduction to Forensic Health Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course will provide a foundational overview for students understanding of forensic health science as it applies and interfaces with the legal and health care system. The course will also assist students from various disciplines in analyzing the foundation for ethical decision making with respect to the law and the forensics in multiple areas of practice.

NURS 303. Health Promotion Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on health promotion and disease prevention strategies. Emphasis will be placed on improving the health of the community by empowering individuals, families, and groups to making positive lifestyle choices. This course will focus on integrating skills such as critical thinking, teaching and learning, interdisciplinary collaboration, communication, and cultural competency into experiences in a variety of settings.

NURS 305. Nutrition Healthy Lifestyle Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces fundamentals of human nutrition for the promotion of optimal health and wellness across the life span.

NURS 306. Health Care in an Aging Society Credit 3(3-0)
This course is intended to introduce the student to the principles of health care in an aging society. Students will be exposed to the concepts that are applicable to caring for the elderly as well as being introduced to various interdisciplinary agencies that work with the elderly to ensure a holistic approach to their care. Prerequisites: Senior Standing in the University.

NURS 315. Women’s Health across the Lifespan Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines health and health care from a historical perspective. Implications of female gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and spirituality are examined. The course explores healthcare delivery systems and the impact of environment on health. Prerequisites: ENGL 101.

NURS 320. Health Assessment Credit 3(1-4)
The course prepares the student to perform physical health assessments using a patient-centered holistic approach. Students will have opportunities to practice physical assessment techniques and make clinical judgments in a laboratory and/or clinical setting. Prerequisites: Enrolled in ABSN Entry Option or BIOL 361, NURS 226 and Co-requisite: NURS 326.

NURS 325. Foundations of Professional Nursing Credit 5(3-4)
This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of professional evidence-based nursing. Basic human needs, the nursing process and fundamental nursing skills that are essential to provide patient-centered care are presented and used to guide professional evidence-based nursing practice. There is a laboratory component where skills are practiced and competency is demonstrated. Prerequisites: Enrolled in ABSN Entry Option.

NURS 326. Foundations of Professional Nursing Credit 4(2-4)
This course expands fundamental concepts of professional, evidence-based nursing to include psychomotor skills related to basic human needs. The scientific and physiological basis for nursing practice and clients with special needs are presented. There is a laboratory component where skills are practiced and competency is demonstrated. Prerequisites: Nursing Majors Only. Corequisites: NURS 320.

NURS 335. Pharmacology in Nursing Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the nurse’s role in medication administration and usage. The course will also increase the student’s knowledge of categories of medications and their effects upon various populations. It will enable the student to determine and evaluate the educational and patient care goals regarding medication administration. The student will learn to use information technology to stay current with new drugs and collaborate within interprofessional teams to ensure quality patient-centered care. Prerequisites: Enrolled in ABSN Entry Option or Nursing Upper Division.

NURS 355. Adult Health I Credit 7(3-2-9)
This course focuses on the refinement of cognitive and psychomotor nursing skills. Physiological and psychosocial needs of adults with acute and/or chronic illnesses are explored in the context of professional nursing. The theory and clinical components focus on development of critical thinking skills and clinical judgment. Using evidence-based nursing practice as their foundation, students provide quality patient-centered care as part of an interdisciplinary team. Prerequisites: NURS 320, NURS 326.

NURS 356. Adult Health Credit 7(4-2-6)
This course focuses on the continued development of cognitive and psychomotor nursing skills. Psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual needs of adults with acute and chronic illness are explored in the context of professional nursing. The theory and clinical components focus on critical thinking and clinical judgment. Students learn to work within interprofessional teams and employ evidence-based practice to provide quality patient-centered care. Prerequisites: NURS 325.

NURS 358. Pathophysiology Credit 3(3-0)
The course focuses on the development of nursing knowledge in pathophysiology as a foundation for evidence-based, patient-centered care. Students learn to differentiate normal from abnormal physiological functioning and identify the etiology of pathophysiological alterations in illness across the lifespan. Prerequisites: Nursing Majors Only.

NURS 360. Concepts in Professional Nursing Credit 3(3-0)
An introduction to professional nursing as a discipline is explored. An overview of the development of nursing knowledge is presented. Theories and concepts influencing professional nursing and health care are emphasized. Course assignments develop self awareness, critical thinking skills, written communication, and professional values. Prerequisites: Enrolled in BSN Completion Option.

NURS 361. Nursing Research for Evidence-Based Practice Credit 3(3-0)
An overview of the research process and evidence-based practice are presented. Their contribution to the development of nursing knowledge and practice are emphasized. The historical evolution of nursing research and its impact on current issues are examined. Current research studies are critically appraised for quality and application to evidence-based nursing practice. Ethical considerations and rights of human participants are explored. Prerequisites: Nursing Majors Only.

NURS 362. Student Success I Credits 1(1-0)
The course is designed to support students’ transition to higher education. Students will explore strategies to achieve personal, academic and professional success. Prerequisites: Enrolled in BSN Completion Option.

NURS 363. Advanced Health Assessment Credit 3(1-4)
This course is designed to assist the student to build on prior education and experience to refine history-taking as well as physical and psychosocial assessment skills. It focuses on assessment of diverse populations throughout the lifespan. It includes patient-centered approaches with faculty as facilitators. Students use advanced health assessment techniques and skills to collect and analyze health data using a holistic approach that incorporates cultural, socioeconomic, nutritional, developmental, spiritual, physiological, and psychological assessments. Prerequisites: Enrolled in BSN Completion Option.

NURS 364. Applied Ethics in Professional Nursing Practice Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to examine ethical and moral dilemmas encountered by the professional nurse. Personal value systems related to nursing ethics will also be examined. The course focuses on ethical concepts, theories, and values applied in ethical decision-making. Students have the opportunity to apply ethical principles to selected global health issues, issues related to social and economic disparities, and other complex health issues affecting nursing practice. Prerequisites: Nursing Majors Only.

NURS 365. Collaborative Interprofessional Practice Credit 3(3-0)
This course describes specific values, roles expectations and responsibilities of nurses and health care professionals engaged in interprofessional collaborative practice. Effective communication and collaborative skills and team-based care will be discussed and demonstrated. Students will reflect on their personal and professional values and develop ways to practice in teams that improve patient care outcomes. Prerequisites: Nursing Majors Only.

NURS 366. Contemporary Issues in Nursing Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines current issues and trends influencing nursing and healthcare, including societal and cultural behaviors. The role of the nurse is examined through the presentation of topics important to professional nursing. Prerequisites: Nursing Majors Only.

NURS 367. Student Success II Credit 1(1-0)
This course is designed to support students’ transition into the nursing major. The course emphasizes the development of critical thinking and decision making skills. The course will also focus on strategies to enhance academic success. Prerequisites: Nursing Majors Only.

NURS 412. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Credit 4(2-0-6)
This course provides an introduction to patient-centered nursing care for individuals and families experiencing acute and chronic mental health needs across the life span. The clinical component allows the students the opportunity to construct and implement a therapeutic plan of care based on patient needs. Prerequisites: NURS 355.

NURS 413. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Credit 4(3-0-3)
This course provides an introduction to patient-centered nursing care for individuals and families experiencing acute and chronic mental health needs across the life span. In the clinical portion of the course, the students will learn to work within interprofessional teams and employ evidence-based practice, technology and informatics to provide quality patient-centered care and implement a therapeutic plan of care based on patient needs. Prerequisites: NURS 356.

NURS 415. Health Care in a Global Society Credits 3(3-0)
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to learn about the impact of health and illness on all populations in the United States and selected countries worldwide. Students will be able to compare the major public health concerns in the United States to those in other countries. Prerequisites: Enrolled in one of the nursing entry options or by permission of the instructor.

NURS 418. Childbearing Family and Women’s Health across the Lifespan Credit 4(2-0-6)
This course focuses on the concepts and theories essential in providing nursing care to childbearing families, newborns, and women. Incorporated into the course are methods of adaptation to physiological and psychological stressors inherent in this group of patients. In the clinical portion of the course the students will learn to work with interdisciplinary teams, employ evidence-based practice, technology, and informatics to provide quality patient-centered care. Prerequisites: NURS 355.

NURS 419. Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family and Women’s Health Credit 4(3-0-3)
This course focuses on the concepts and theories essential in providing nursing care to childbearing families, newborns and women. Incorporated into the course are methods of adaptation to physiological and psychological stressors inherent in this group of patients. In the clinical portion of the course, the students will learn to work within interprofessional teams and employ evidence-based practice, technology, and informatics to provide quality patient-centered care. Prerequisites: NURS 356.

NURS 420. Childrearing Family and Child and Adolescent Health Credit 4(2-0-6)
This course focuses on the development of professional knowledge and specialized skills in family centered care. Emphasis is placed on the stages of physiological and psychosocial development and health care needs from infancy to adolescence. The clinical practicum portion of the course assists the student in developing critical skills related to the nursing care of infants, children, adolescents and their families. Prerequisites: NURS 355.

NURS 421. Nursing Care of the Childrearing Family and Child and Adolescent Health Credit 4(3-0-3)
This course focuses on the development of professional knowledge and specialized skills in family centered care. Emphasis is placed on the stages of physiological, cognitive, and psychosocial development and health care needs from infancy to adolescence. In the clinical portion of the course, the students will learn to work within interprofessional teams and employ evidence-based practice, technology, and informatics to provide quality family-centered care.  Prerequisites: NURS 413.

NURS 424. Advanced Adult Health Credit 8(4-0-12)
This course focuses on the integration of knowledge and continued development of cognitive and psychomotor skills. The theory and clinical components enhance critical thinking and clinical judgment through the use of evidence-based practice. Learners provide patient-centered nursing care within interprofessional teams to adults experiencing complex, acute and chronic illnesses in a variety of health care settings. Prerequisites: NURS 356.

NURS 455. Adult Health II Credit 6(3-0-9)
This course builds on the content found in Adult Health I and further refines the cognitive and psychomotor skills in the management and care of adults with increasingly more complex acute and chronic illnesses. The course emphasizes holistic care of an aging population and the genetic influences on health and illness. As in Adult Health I, the theory and clinical components focus on critical thinking and clinical judgment. Students learn to work in interdisciplinary teams and employ evidence-based practice to provide quality patient-centered care. Prerequisites: NURS 355, NURS 358.

NURS 456. Student Success III Credit 1(1-0)
This course is designed to prepare students for a smooth transition into their professional role. Students will explore personal and professional issues that will impact their future practice. Students will be expected to demonstrate higher order critical thinking and decision making skills. The focus will be on professional skill building and portfolio development. Prerequisites: Nursing Majors Only.

NURS 457. Adult Health III Credit 4(2-0-6)
This course focuses on both the theoretical content and its application in a holistic manner to manage patients with complex and high acuity illnesses. The clinical component of this course is designed to provide a practicum with high acuity care experiences. Psychosocial, lifespan, and behavioral issues encountered by patients with high acuity disorders and/or trauma will be discussed. Prerequisites: NURS 455, NURS 412.

NURS 458. Bridge to Professional Nursing Practice Credit 3(0-0-9)
This nursing capstone course provides a focused patient care experience. The course is designed to assist the student to transition to entry level practice. Emphasis is on working within interprofessional teams using leadership skills and evidence-based knowledge. Learning experiences take place in a variety of healthcare settings and faculty-led seminars. Prerequisites: NURS 455 or NURS 424 depending on entry option.

NURS 459. Student Success II Credit 1(1-0)
This course is designed to support students’ transition into the baccalaureate prepared nursing role. The course emphasizes the development of higher order critical thinking and decision making skills. The focus will be on professional skill building and portfolio development. Prerequisite: Enrolled in BSN Completion Option.

NURS 460. Community Health Nursing Credit 6(3-0-9)
This course focuses on the care of clients experiencing health problems as individuals, families, groups and communities. Emphasis is on the utilization of the nursing process in promoting, maintaining and restoring health. The epidemiological approach is introduced as a methodology for the study of populations and high risk groups in various settings. Prerequisites: Enrolled in BSN Completion Option.

NURS 461. Community Health Nursing Credit 4(2-0-6)
This course focuses on the care of clients experiencing health problems as individuals, families, groups and communities. Emphasis is on the utilization of the nursing process in promoting, maintaining and restoring health. The epidemiological approach is introduced as a methodology for the study of populations and high risk groups in various settings. Prerequisites: NURS 455.

NURS 462. Community Health Nursing Credit 4(3-0-3)
The course focuses on the care of clients experiencing health problems as individuals, families, groups and communities. Emphasis is on the utilization of the nursing process in promoting, maintaining and restoring health. The epidemiological approach is introduced as a methodology for the study of populations and high risk groups in various settings. Prerequisites: NURS 421.

NURS 464. Leadership and Management Credit 4(3-0-3)
This course focuses on the identification and development of leadership and management principles within a rapidly changing healthcare environment. Selected concepts, such as quality improvement, change, patient safety, finance and health policy and politics are explored. The course is designed to facilitate the students’ self-assessment of their leadership and management skills. It includes opportunities for scholarly inquiry and professional communication. A precepted practicum with a nurse leader facilitates the transition to professional nurse. Prerequisites: Enrolled in ABSN Entry Option or Corequisite NURS 467.

NURS 465. Synthesis of Professional Nursing Practice Credit 3(0-0-9)
This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to integrate and apply newly acquired knowledge and skills in a variety of settings and roles. The experience allows students to work with a nurse mentor and various experts and engage in collaborative interprofessional practice. Students will observe and demonstrate respectful interactions and knowledge sharing between members of the health care team. Using current knowledge of health disparity populations may be part of this experience. Prerequisites: Enrolled in BSN Completion Option.

NURS 466. Transition to Professional Nursing Practice Credit 0(0-0)
The course is designed to prepare second career students for a smooth transition into their professional nursing role. Students will explore personal and professional issues that will impact future practice. Students will be expected to demonstrate higher order critical thinking and decision making skills. The focus will be on professional skill building and portfolio development. Prerequisites: Enrolled in the ABSN Entry Option.

NURS 467. Nursing Informatics: Application of Patient Care Technology Credit 3(2-2)
Course work focuses on development of knowledge and skills required to use information management and patient care technologies to deliver safe and effective care. Practical experience with a variety of patient care technologies relevant to evidence-based practice is included. Corequisites: NURS 464.

NURS 490. Registered Nurse First Assistant I Credit 3.0(2.5-0.5-0)
This is the first of a two course series that prepares registered nurses (RNs) for the RN First Assistant role according to the guidelines published in the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) Core Curriculum. The course provides the perioperative nurse and advanced practice RNs (APRNs) with the foundational knowledge and skills to function at an expanded practice level. Content includes vascular, orthopedic, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and other surgical procedures; responses to various physiologic complications; team building, communication and conflict resolution; and practice in tissue handling, retracting, exposing, clamping, ligating, suturing, and providing hemostasis. Prerequisites: Student must meet all Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) Registered Nurse First Assistant (RNFA) program entry criteria and have permission of instructor.

NURS 491. Registered Nurse First Assistant II Credit 1.0-3.0(0-0-3 to 0-0-9)
This is the second of a two course series that prepares registered nurses for the RN First Assistant role according to the guidelines published in the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) Core Curriculum. The course builds on the foundational knowledge and skills acquired in NURS 490 to prepare perioperative and advanced practice RNs to function at an expanded practice level. The course takes place in a variety of health care settings through a precepted clinical experience. Pre- or Corequisite:  NURS 490 and with permission of instructor.

NURS 516. Independent Study Credit 1-3([1-3)]-0)
This course is designed to provide a unique experience that offers the nursing student an opportunity to creatively demonstrate learning objectives within the framework of a holistic, patient centered curriculum. Faculty facilitate learning through collaboration with students. Prerequisites: Prior Permission Required.

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

*Sharon Allen
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
B.S.N., Winston Salem State University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Post-master’s certificate, PNP, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

*Charlotte Atkins
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
B.S.N., M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Lorraine Anderson
Assistant Professor
B.S.N., University of Connecticut; M.S., Our Lady of the Lake University; M.P.A., University of Southern California; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University

Cynthia Bacon
Assistant Professor
B.S.N., Notre Dame of Maryland University; M.A.S.; John Hopkins University; M.S.N., John Hopkins University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Cathy Badgett
Clinical Assistant Professor
B.S.N., North Carolina Central University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Ed.D., University of Phoenix

*Andrea Broadnax
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
B.S.N., M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Pamella Chavis
Clinical Associate Professor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Ed.D., University of Phoenix

Charlotte Evans
Clinical Assistant Professor
B.S.N., Avila College; M.N., Witchita State University

Bonnie Fields
Clinical Assistant Professor
B.S.N., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Pandora Goode
Clinical Assistant Professor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.N., Winston-Salem State University; Post-master’s certificate, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; D.N.P., University of Tennessee-Memphis

Evelyn Hoover
Assistant Professor
B.S.N., University of Maryland, M.S., University of Maryland, Ph.D., Binghamton University

Deborah Lekan
Assistant Professor
B.S.N., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, M.S.N., Georgetown University, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

*Wanda Martin
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.P.H., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Yvonne McKoy
Associate Professor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.N., East Carolina University; Ph.D., Florida State University

Annette Millner
Clinical Instructor
B.S.N., Hampton University, M.S.N., Walden University

Frostenia Milner
Clinical Associate Professor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Tiffany Morris
Clinical Assistant Professor
B.S.N., University of Virginia, M.S.N., University of Phoenix

*Debra Neblett
Clinical Assistant Professor
B.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Zula Price
Clinical Assistant Professor
B.A., Clarke Atlanta University; B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Schenita Randolph
Assistant  Professor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.P.H., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Walden University

Ruthie Rogers
Clinical Instructor
B.S.N., Winston-Salem State University, M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

*Christina Saunders
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
B.S. N., M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Patricia Shelton
Associate Professor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Ph.D., University of South Carolina at Columbia

Cynthia Shores
Clinical Instructor
B.S.N., University of North Carolina at Charlotte, M.S.N., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Smriti Shrestha
Lecturer
B.S., M.A., Tribhuvan University, M.S. Kansas State University

*Tanya Stalling
Adjunct Clinical Instructor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Catherine Sykes
Clinical Assistant Professor
B.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S.N., University of Maryland at Baltimore

Inez Tuck
Professor
B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University, M.N., University of Florida; M.B.A., University of Tennessee at Knoxville; M. Div., Virginia Union University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Mary Uzochukwu
Lecturer
A.S.S., Southeast Community College; B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Terry Ward
Associate Professor
B.S.N., M.S.N., University of Mobile, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Wanda Williamson
Clinical Associate Professor
A.D.N., Rockingham Community College; B.S.N., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; D.N.P., University of Alabama

Sonja Wilson
Assistant Professor
B.S.N., Winston Salem State University; M.S.N., Hunter College of the City of New York; Ed.D., Teacher’s College-Columbia University

*Part-Time 

Points of Pride