Department of Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience Education

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/saes/academics/agribus/index.html

Anthony Yeboah, Chairperson

OBJECTIVES

The Department of Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience Education offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Agricultural Education. It also offers programs leading to Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Agricultural and Environmental Systems with a concentration in Agribusiness and Food Industry Management. Students who pursue the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Education may concentrate in Secondary Education or Agricultural Professional Service. In addition, students may take prescribed courses in Rural Sociology and Sociology.

The objectives of the Agricultural Education programs are to train students to understand and apply the educational concepts in order to identify, analyze, and resolve management problems of the farm, agribusiness firms, rural communities, and government agencies, as well as preparing students for further study in Agricultural Education.

The Agricultural Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction for the preparation of teachers in agriculture in the public school system. Agricultural Education majors in both the Secondary Education and Agricultural Professional Service study tracks are expected to complete a second major concentration in a basic academic discipline to include 24-27 semester credit hours. The second major concentration requirement consists of a combination of specified technical classes in addition to classes taken from the general education and technical agriculture core as determined by the student’s advisor. The major options available include agricultural science, animal science, agribusiness and marketing, agricultural communications, natural and environmental science, plant and soil science, and rural sociology.

The Agricultural and Environmental Systems (Agribusiness and Food Industry Management) programs provide a course of study that develops the requisite interpersonal and communication skills, knowledge base, critical thinking skills, and applied business skills that are required to have a successful career in an ever-changing economic, technological, political, and social environment. The programs teach the application of business concepts to the agricultural industry. The core is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic functions of business and the application of theory and practice to the agribusiness industry. The directed and free electives enable students to generally emphasize some aspect of marketing or management with courses in both agriculture and business.

DEGREES OFFERED

Agricultural Education (Secondary Education) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Agricultural Education (Agricultural Professional Service) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Agricultural and Environmental Systems (Agribusiness and Food Industry Management) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

Interdisciplinary certificate programs are offered to students enrolled in Bachelor of Science programs at the University. Areas of specialization include Entrepreneurship (18 credit hours), Biotechnology (18 credit hours) and Waste Management (18 to 20 credits hours) and Agricultural and Natural Resources Information Science (18 credit hours).

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The admission of students to the undergraduate degree program is based upon the general admission requirements of the University.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

Undergraduate majors in Agricultural Education must complete 127 semester hours of University courses. Students must earn an average grade of “C” in all Agricultural Education courses in order to meet the major field requirements.. Agricultural education majors must earn a minimum grade point average of 2.8 to be admitted to the teacher education program, in addition to other admission requirements.

As mandated by the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction, all candidates for teacher licensure will need to show evidence of computer competency. A basic skills test will need to be passed. Additionally, students must produce an electronic portfolio showing advanced technology for teaching skills during their program of study. The University, through course work, will provide opportunities for students to produce materials necessary to fulfill the technology portfolio requirement.

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM

The goals and objectives of the Teacher Education Program in agricultural education, as mandated by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction (SDPI), address the development of competencies in the areas of animal science, soil science, plant science, agricultural and natural resources, horticulture, agricultural economics, agricultural mechanics, and agricultural communication. The goals of the program are twofold and are listed below:

  1. Develop an understanding of and appreciation for teaching agricultural education; and
  2. Develop competencies needed by individuals to teach agriculture in North Carolina public secondary schools.

The fourteen objectives of the agricultural education teacher preparation program are listed below:

  1. To promote the agricultural education program in secondary schools; to meet the needs and interests of students and to satisfy employment demands;
  2. To plan for effective public relations;
  3. To plan for effective and comprehensive instruction;
  4. To manage the classrooms and laboratories effectively;
  5. To aid students in making career decisions;
  6. To evaluate vocational agriculture programs and student progress;
  7. To advise and manage the Future Farmers of America (FFA) as an integral part of instruction;
  8. To extend learning experiences for students beyond the classroom through Supervised Occupational Experience Program;
  9. To plan and conduct a program of career exploration and guidance and provide hands-on learning experiences in technical agriculture including animal science, soil science, plant science, agricultural and natural resources, agricultural economics and agricultural mechanics;
  10. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into agricultural production occupations and/or to pursue further training in the subject area;
  11. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into agricultural mechanics occupations and/or pursue further training in the subject area;
  12. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into agricultural and natural resources occupations and/or pursue further training in the subject area;
  13. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into forestry occupations and/or pursue further training in the subject area;
  14. To plan and conduct a program to develop knowledge and skills needed for job entry into agricultural products and processing occupations and/or pursue further training in the subject area.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Students who successfully complete programs in Agricultural Education are prepared for careers in teaching, supervision in schools and colleges, agricultural extension, agricultural-related business firms and industries, trade and professional associations, government and private research firms, government services (legislative, administration, or professional), as well as for further study for advanced degrees.

Internationally and locally, there are thousands of jobs in Agribusiness and Food Industry Management. Many of our students have obtained jobs that combine their love of the industry with good incomes. The business side of this degree provides the students with multiple avenues that ensures a successful career.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION (Undergraduate)

AGED 101. Introduction to Agriscience Education Credit 1(1-0)
This course includes a study of the broad base of modern agriculture with emphasis on current trends and opportunities. (F)

AGED 200. Introduction to Rural Leadership Credit  3(3-0)
This special topics course is designed to provide a basic introduction to leadership by focusing on what it means to be a good leader and the impact of leadership in a rural setting. Emphasis in the course is on the practice of leadership. The course will examine topics such as: the nature of leadership, recognizing leadership traits, developing leadership skills, creating a vision, setting the tone, listening to out-group members, overcoming obstacles, and addressing values in leadership. Attention will be given to helping students to understand and improve their own leadership performance.

AGED 300. Introduction to International Agriculture Credit 3(3-0)
This is an introductory course to acquaint students with international agriculture and agricultural developments, including the relationship between agricultural systems in various countries and the impact of world agriculture on the U.S. and other countries. It provides introduction for students who plan careers in agricultural education in the U.S. or other countries. (DEMAND)

AGED 400. Instructional Technology In Agriscience Education Credit 3(3-0)
This course will cover the utilization of multimedia instructional tools, and how their applications can enhance the learning process. (F;S)

AGED 401. Leadership Theory and Youth Program Management Credit 3(3-0)
Theories in leadership development will be analyzed, and the organization of youth groups in secondary schools, cooperative extension, and other community groups will be examined. (F)

AGED 402. History and Philosophy of Agriscience Education in the American Public School System Credit 3(3-0)
The historical and philosophical structure of agriculture in the American public school system will be analyzed. (S)

AGED 403. Adult Education in Agriscience and Extension Education Credit 3(3-0)
Principles and techniques for organizing educational programs for adults involved in the food and fiber system. (F;S)

AGED 501. Materials and Methods of Teaching Agricultural Education and Extension Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the principles of teaching as applied to agriculture in secondary schools and cooperative extension. Preparing and using lesson plans and organizing teaching aids to meet educational and community needs will also be a part of this course. Prerequisites: AGED 400, 401, and 402; PSYC 320. (F)

AGED 502. Student-Teaching Credit 12(12-0)
Students will be required to spend a minimum of twelve weeks in an approved teaching center doing observation and directed student teaching. Prerequisite: AGED 501. (F;S)

AGED 503. Program Planning and Evaluation Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the process of program building and evaluation in agricultural and extension education. Prerequisites: AGED 501 and 502. (F;S)

AGED 504. Internship in Extension, Government, or Agribusiness Credit 6(6-0)
Students will be required to spend a minimum of six weeks in an approved extension program, governmental agency, or agribusiness firm doing observation and directed professional work. (F;S;SS)

AGED 520. Special Problems in Agricultural Education and Extension Credit 1-6(1-6)
Special work in problems dealing with Agricultural Education and Extension will be examined. (Enrollment by permission of department)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate

AGED 600. Youth Organization and Program Management Credit 3(3-0)
Principles, theories, and practices involved in organizing, conducting, supervising and managing youth organizations and programs will be examined. Emphasis will be on the analysis of youth organization and programs in vocational and extension education. (SS)

AGED 601. Adult Education in Vocational and Extension Education Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the principles and problems of organizing and conducting programs for adults. Emphasis is given to the principles of conducting organized instruction in agricultural education, extension and related industries. (F)

AGED 607. Environmental Education Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the principles and practices of understanding the environment and the interrelated complexities of the environment. The course will include a study of agricultural occupations related to the environment and materials that need to be developed for use by high school teachers of agriculture and other professional workers. (S)

AGED 608. Agricultural Extension Organization and Methods Credit 3(3-0)
The principles, objectives, organization, program development and methods in cooperative extension will be examined. (F)

AGED 609. Community Analysis and Rural Life Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of the educational processes, structure and function of rural society, and the role which diverse organizations, agencies, and institutions play in the education and adjustment of rural people to the demands of modern society. (SS) (DEMAND)

AGED 610. International Education in Agriculture Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines formal and informal agricultural education systems and related situations and processes which influence agricultural development in developing countries. Included are the nature and scope of the world food situation, the rationale and extent of U.S. involvement in development efforts, and the agencies and organizations involved and procedures they use. Educational programs that will enable families to improve their quality of life will be emphasized. (DEMAND)

AGED 611. Special Problems In Agricultural Education and Extension Credit 1-6 (1-6 repeatable)
Special work in problems dealing with Agricultural Education and Extension will be examined. Students should be at the graduate level or be working on their lateral or provisional license in agricultural education. (Enrollment by permission of department.)

AGED 612. Field Studies In Agricultural Education Credit 1-6(1-6 repeatable)
Field Studies involved in Agricultural and Extension Education. (Enrollment by permission of department.)

AGED 620. Rural Communities and Leadership Credit 3(3-0)
This course will focus upon the importance of grassroots leadership development within the context of rural community settings.

Course Descriptions in Agricultural AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (AGRIBUSINESS AND FOOD INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT)
(Undergraduate)

ABM 130. Introduction to Agribusiness and Food Industries Credits 1(1-0)
This course provides an introductory overview of the characteristics, scope and functions of the U.S. food and fiber production/processing/distributing system. (F)

ABM 240. Information Technology in Agribusiness Credits 3(3-0)
This course is designed to include practical use of computers and information technology to manage agribusiness topics. (F)

ABM 300. Rural Communities and Economic Development Credits 3(3-0)
This course is designed to offer participants an in depth understanding of rural communities in contemporary Western society. The central focus in this course is on the set of social and economic components that constitute the very fabric of communities in the context of rural settings. (F)

ABM 330. Applied Economics in Agribusiness Credits 3(3-0)
This course presents microeconomic and macroeconomic principles that relate to the consumption and production of food and fiber. (F;S)

ABM 335. The Economics of World Food and Resources Credits 3(3-0)
This course provides an international and multidisciplinary perspective on food security and resources. (S)

ABM 340. The Global Agricultural Economy, Hunger and Poverty Credits 3(3-0)
This course will introduce students to the interdependencies between the world's food, populations, and poverty problems. Specific emphasis will be placed on relationships between wealthy and poor countries, particularly in terms of policies, trade, and aid. (S)

ABM 406. Quantitative Analysis in Agribusiness Credits 3(3-0)
This course will introduce modern quantitative methods used in decision making in business and economics. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and interpreting standard techniques using relevant software. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and ABM 240. (F;S)

ABM 430. Agribusiness Sales and Advertising Credits 3(3-0)
This course presents the principles of professional sales techniques used by food and agricultural firms. A study of the major marketing strategies and decisions that must be made by agribusiness firms, including target market selection, marketing research, sales forecasting, product policies, distribution channels, pricing, and advertising. Prerequisite: ABM 330. (S)

ABM 432. Accounting for Agribusiness Credits 3(3-0)
This course will introduce financial accounting. Specific topics to be covered include the accounting cycle, merchandise accounting, accounting procedures for cash, receivables, payables, inventories, plant and equipment, stocks and bonds. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and ABM 330. (F)

ABM 434. Food and Agribusiness Marketing Credits 3(3-0)
This course emphasizes the principles and practices as applied to food and fiber products.  Other issues to be examined include form, place and time possession utility; the ultimate consumer's market, food and agricultural industries, the system of middlemen, exchange market operations, futures contracts, price determination, and marketing cost. Prerequisite: ABM 330 (F)

AGEC 436. Agricultural Prices Credits 3(3-0)
Information regarding agricultural price changes, index numbers, price determination, seasonal and cyclical price movements, storage problems, methods of controlling extreme price fluctuations, and government price policy will be covered. Prerequisite: ABM 330. (S)

ABM 438. Resource and Environmental Economics and Policy Credits 3(3-0)
This courses presents economic theory and concepts associated with natural resources - renewable resources (forests, fisheries and wildlife populations), and non-renewable resources (minerals and energy resources, soil); implications of market failures for public policy; design of environmental policy; theory of welfare measurement; and measuring the benefits of environmental improvement. Prerequisite: ABM 330. (S)

ABM 442. Futures and Options Markets Credits 3(3-0)
This course studies the behavior of futures markets; how public agencies, businesses, and others use those markets. It also studies nature of various strategies involving options, commodity and futures contracts. Price determination in options and futures markets are examined. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and ABM 330. (F)

ABM 444. Financial Analysis for Agribusiness Credits 3(3-0)
This course covers the principles of financial management for agribusiness firms. Topics include the time value of money, analysis of financial records and of financial feasibility. Investment analysis, risk, markets and sources of loans for agribusiness firms will be explored. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and ABM 330. (F)

ABM 446. Introduction to Agribusiness Research Methods Credits 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide a general understanding of agribusiness research through the use of various techniques of scientific methods. Subject matter includes the evaluation of research design - problem identification, literature review, data collection, methods of analysis, presentation of results, interpretation of findings, formation of conclusions, and the communication of recommendations. Prerequisite: ECON 305 or ABM 406. (S)

ABM 448. Internship Credits 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide the student with a capstone experience. The student participates in a temporary period of supervised work experience which provides him/her with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a work situation. The internship is designed to give students supervised work experience in agriculture and environmental sciences. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. (F;S;SS)

ABM 450. Agricultural Cooperatives Credits 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to an in-depth examination of the agricultural cooperative. Students will gain a working knowledge of the concepts, principles, and terminology of agricultural cooperatives through reference materials, lectures and presentations by guest speakers. The course will also explore the strengths and weaknesses of agricultural cooperative as well as its unique management and operational challenges. Prerequisite: ABM 330. (S)

ABM 480. Agribusiness and Food Industry Management Credits 3(3-0)
The economic structure and importance of the agribusiness and food industry will be discussed. Other topics to be covered include marketing, production, risk, human resource management, and financial management in agribusiness firms. Prerequisites: MATH 111 and ABM 330. (F)

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate

ABM 632. Food and Agricultural Policy Credit 3(3-0)
Principles of agricultural and food policy formulation; agricultural adjustment processes; agricultural price and income policies in relation to land use, water, and rural development policies; interrelationships among U.S. and foreign agriculture and trade policies. (S)

ABM 634. International Agribusiness Marketing Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course will examine and analyze the series of problems, issues, policies, regulations and procedures relevant to the global marketing of agricultural and related commodities by agribusiness firms. Emphasis will be on combining firm-level agribusiness marketing concepts with international agribusiness marketing and export management practices, including the development of international agribusiness marketing plans and case studies from international agribusiness firms. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (F)

ABM 638. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed for students who desire to work out special problems in the field of agricultural economics; problem definition, formulation and investigation will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairperson. (F)

ABM 640. Agribusiness Management Credit 3 (3-0)
This course emphasizes decision-making of agribusiness managers, agribusiness management consultants, and entrepreneurs of agriculturally related firms. Contemporary topics facing the agribusiness decision-maker such as how to establish an agriculturally based firm, marketing agribusiness firms through E-Commerce, examining food supply chains, establishing contractual agreements with other firms, and evaluating industrial organization within the agribusiness industry are presented. Students are expected to simulate the decision-making of the agribusiness manager/entrepreneur through the use of case studies, agribusiness projects, agribusiness research, and business plans. (F)

ABM 641. Special Problems in Agribusiness Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course relies heavily on the “Harvard Case Studies Approach” to make decisions and solve problems faced by agribusiness managers. Also, students will be exposed to quantitative techniques for analyzing and solving problems confronting the firm. Emphasis is placed on applying theoretical concepts to the real world decision-making environment. Prerequisite AGEC 640 or consent of instructor. (DEMAND)

ABM 648. Appraisal and Finance of Agribusiness Firms Credit 3(3-0)
This course evaluates principles of land valuation, appraisal and taxation. Special areas include the role of credit in a money economy, classification of credit, principles underlying the economic use of credit and the role of the government in the field of credit. (DEMAND)

ABM 675. Computer Applications in Agriculture Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to provide students with the tools to utilize computers for agricultural decision-making. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing existing software packages for microcomputers to make financial, economic and quantitative analysis of farm and agribusiness-related problems.

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Antoine J. Alston
Professor
B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University

Godfrey C. Ejimakor
Professor
B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech

Paula Faulkner
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S. North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., Penn State University

Benjamin Gray
Research Associate Professor
B.S., M.S. North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Kenrett Y. Jefferson-Moore
Associate Professor
B.S. Southern University, M.S. Alabama A&M University, Ph.D. Auburn University

Donald R. McDowell
Professor
B.S., Southern University A&M; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois

John O’Sullivan
Cooperative Extension Faculty, Kellogg Endowed Chair
B.A., Stanford University; M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles

John P. Owens
Adjunct Instructor
B.S. Appalachian State University, M.S. North Carolina A&T State University

Richard D. Robbins
Professor
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Terrence Thomas
Research Professor
B.S., University of West Indies; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Louisiana State University

Chastity Warren English
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Anthony K. Yeboah
Professor and Chairperson
B.S., University of Science and Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University

Osei-Agyeman Yeboah
Research Associate Professor
B.S. University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana, M.S. North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D. University of Nebraska

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