Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/coe/elen/index.html

John C. Kelly, Jr., Chairperson

DEGREES OFFERED

Electrical Engineering – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Computer Engineering – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

MISSION

The mission of the Bachelor of Science program in Electrical Engineering is to educate our students with the knowledge and skills relevant to the practice of electrical engineering, to instill in them the desire for continuing education, and to maintain a supportive environment for the students, faculty and staff.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Graduates of the Electrical Engineering program will:

  1. Be employed in the electrical engineering profession or continue with graduate education.
  2. Demonstrate teamwork and leadership skills in solving interdisciplinary problems.
  3. Be active in their communities and professional societies.
  4. Enhance their professional development through life-long learning.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The electrical engineering major must complete 126 credit hours following the approved departmental curriculum. Majors must also satisfy all University and College of Engineering requirements.

ACCREDITATION

The undergraduate program in Electrical Engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) degree, is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

A degree in this field prepares a student for careers in electronics, communications and signal processing, robotics, power and control engineering, or for graduate study in electrical or computer engineering.

COMPUTER ENGINEERING PROGRAM

MISSION

The mission of the Bachelor of Science program in Computer Engineering is to educate our students with the knowledge and skills relevant to the practice of computer engineering, to instill in them the desire for continuing education, and to maintain a supportive environment for the students, faculty and staff.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Graduates of the Computer Engineering program will:

  1. Be employed in the computer engineering profession or continue with graduate education.
  2. Demonstrate teamwork and leadership skills in solving interdisciplinary problems.
  3. Be active in their communities and professional societies.
  4. Enhance their professional development through life-long learning.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The computer engineering major must complete 124 credit hours following the approved departmental curriculum. Majors must also satisfy all University and College of Engineering requirements.

ACCREDITATION

The undergraduate program in Computer Engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering degree, is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in this field prepares a student for careers in computer system design, networks and data communications, or for graduate study in electrical or computer engineering. Specific opportunities include Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) and Very Large Scale Integrated Circuit (VLSI) design, digital signal processing, electro-mechanical system design, data and signal communication, controls, embedded systems, biological and chemical system modeling/analysis, computer graphics, artificial intelligence, avionics, robotics, compiler and operating system design, computer system architecture, fault-tolerant system design, and software engineering and design.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

ECEN 101. Engineering Problem Solving Credit 3(3-0)
This course emphasizes the enhancement of engineering problem solving. Students will enhance their ability to apply mathematics to solve simple engineering problems. Study habits appropriate to engineering will be emphasized. Students will also develop their life-long learning skills.

ECEN 121. ECE Colloquium Credit 1(1-0)
This course includes lectures, seminars and activities important to the retention and matriculation of electrical and computer engineering students. Topics covered include learning styles, group dynamics, and career development. Students are also provided with group advisement regarding department, college, and university-level policies and procedures.

ECEN 200. Electric Circuit Analysis Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers circuit analysis using Kirchhoff’s Laws, loop and nodal analysis, Thévenin’s and Norton’s theorems, etc., for resistive circuits with DC sources. The transient behavior of first and second order (RC, RL, and RLC) circuits and steady state sinusoidal analysis are also covered. Prerequisite: ECEN 101. Corequisite: MATH 431. (F;S;SS)

ECEN 227. Introduction to Finite Automata and Discrete Math Credit 3 (3-0)
This course is an introduction to applied discrete mathematics. Topics include set theory, introduction to logic, functions, recursion, relations, Boolean algebra, applications of elementary graph theory, trees and applications, and mathematical techniques for algorithm analysis.

ECEN 300. Electric Circuit Analysis II Credit 3 (3-0)
This course is a continuation of ECEN 200. It covers sinusoidal steady state solutions to linear circuits in the time and frequency domain. Laplace transforms, transfer functions, Fourier series, Bode plots, passive and active filters, transformers, two-port circuits, and polyphase circuits will also be covered. Prerequisite: ECEN 200 and MATH 431.

ECEN 306. Circuits and Systems Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3)
This course covers the proper use of laboratory instrumentation, principles of measurements, experimental verification of transient and steady state response, frequency response, and resonance of systems with linear passive elements. Theoretical analyses and computer simulations of networks are compared with laboratory experimental results using actual circuits. Corequisite: ECEN 300.

ECEN 320. Electronics I Credit 3 (3-0)
This course is an introduction to electronic circuit design. It covers basic amplifiers, diode circuits, dc biasing and mid-frequency response of bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and field effect transistor (FET) amplifiers. The terminal behavior, and linear and nonlinear modeling of these devices are emphasized. Prerequisite: ECEN 200. (F;S)

ECEN 327. Digital Logic Credit 3 (3-0)
This course involves the study of fundamental combinational and sequential logic circuit analysis/design. Combinational concepts covered include Boolean algebra, k-maps, basic logic gates, and small/medium scale integrated circuits. Sequential concepts covered include basic latches/flip-flops, counters, memory registers, and basic synchronous systems. (F;S)

ECEN 328. Digital Logic Laboratory Credit 1 (0-2)
This course deals with the implementation of basic combinational and sequential logic systems. Small and Medium scale integrated circuits utilized in addition to Programmable Logic Devices. Corequisite: ECEN 327. (F;S)

ECEN 340. Electrical Circuits and Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers power and energy concepts; basic R, RC, RL, and RLC circuits; three phase circuits; ideal transformers; diodes and ideal op amp circuits; and logic circuits. The Laplace transform method will be introduced and used to solve circuit problems. Prerequisites: MATH 431 and PHYS 242.

ECEN 356. Stochastic Processes and Random Variables Credit 3 (3-0)
This course covers sample space and events, conditional probabilities, independent events, Bayes formula, discrete random variables, expectation of random variables, joint distribution, conditional expectation, Markov chains stationary processes, ergodicity, correlation and power spectrum of stationary processes, and Gausssian processes. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (S)

ECEN 375. Computer Architecture and Organization Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the design, organization and architecture of computer systems. Topics include central processing unit architecture, instruction set architecture, instruction level parallelism, microcode, system interconnections, memory systems, input/output systems; interrupt handling, peripherals and communications networks. Prerequisite: ECEN 227 and ECEN 327.

ECEN 400. Linear Systems and Signals Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of ECEN 300 that covers the time-domain and Fourier analysis of discrete-time signal and discrete-time systems, state-space analysis, frequency response, digital filter design and introduction to discrete signal processing techniques. Prerequisite: ECEN 300. (F;S)

ECEN 410. Linear Control Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to automatic control theory. It covers control components, development of block diagrams for control systems, analysis, and computer simulations based on time and s domain. Three design methods: Bode-plot, root-locus, and pole placement are discussed. Models may be chosen by minimizing quadratic performance index, ITAE or by computer simulation. Prerequisite: ECEN 300. (S)

ECEN 423. Digital Systems Design I Credit 3(3-0)
This course exposes the students to principles, techniques, and applications of modern digital systems. Design and analysis techniques for combinational and sequential circuits will be discussed. In particular, students will be exposed to: digital system top-down design and analysis, timing, power and performance issues in digital circuits. In addition, the student will be exposed to the Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL)-based system analysis and synthesis, hardware-software co-design, data-flow models, and digital system primitives. Prerequisite: ECEN 327. (S)

ECEN 425. Introduction to Electromagnetics Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of electromagnetic concepts and effects using vector analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (F;S)

ECEN 427. Introduction to Microprocessors Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces the fundamentals of microprocessors, microcomputers, and microcontrollers. Both software and hardware concepts are dealt with. Software concepts include assembly language, machine code, flowcharts, and development/debugging techniques. Hardware concepts included communication ports, interrupts, memory, and common microcontroller subsystems. Prerequisite: ECEN 327. (F;S)

ECEN 429. Digital Systems Design I Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This lab gives students experience in applying the concepts learned in the accompanying class to build actual circuits. Lab experiments include writing applications using a hardware description language (HDL) and observing simulated results. Labs also include the use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) for building circuits described in the HDL. Prerequisite: ECEN 327 and ECEN 328. Corequisite: ECEN 423. (S)

ECEN 430. Power Systems, Energy Conversion and Electric Machinery Credit 3(3-0)
Study of the electric power system as an interconnection of energy conversion and transmission devices; electric machinery; energy and power; and operation of a power system. Prerequisites: ECEN 300 and 425. (F;S)

ECEN 433. Microprocessors Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This course provides practical experience in microprocessor hardware and software, interfacing, and applications. Microprocessor evaluation boards and simulators are utilized throughout the course. Prerequisite: ECEN 328. Corequisite: ECEN 427. (F;S)

ECEN 436. Power Systems, Energy Conversion and Electric Machinery Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
A study of power circuits and the behavior of motors and generators by laboratory experimentation. Prerequisite: ECEN 306. Corequisite: ECEN 430. (F;S)

ECEN 449. Introduction to Communication Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the fundamental principles of modulation theory including amplitude, single- and double-sideband, frequency, phase, pulse amplitude, pulse duration, pulse code modulation methods; and their applications to communication systems with random signals and noise. Prerequisite: ECEN 400. Corequisite: INEN 270.

ECEN 450. Principles of Electromagnetic Waves Credit 3(3-0)
This course emphasizes the following: the basic postulates of electromagnetism; the integral laws of free space; the differential laws in free space; static fields; and time varying fields. Prerequisite: ECEN 425. (S)

ECEN 452. Wireless Communication Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introductory level of wireless communications. Fundamental theory and analysis of wireless mobile communication systems are introduced, including characterization of radio propagation, channel modeling and coding, and a summary of wireless communication standards and multiple access techniques. Also covered are an overview of information networks and a comparison of wireless and conventional communication systems. Prerequisite: ECEN 400. (F)

ECEN 459. Digital and Data Communications Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to digital and data communications. The fundamental theory and applications of modem communication systems are discussed, including a general overview of the data communications area, telephone systems, channel coding, concept of data link protocols, interface standard, modems, multiplexing, multiple access and ISDN. Prerequisite: ECEN 400. (F)

ECEN 460. Electronics II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of Electronics I. It covers the frequency response of single-stage and multi-stage transistors amplifiers, power amplifiers and the basics of analog integrated circuits. Prerequisite: ECEN 320. (F;S)

ECEN 466. Electronics II Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This course includes design and analysis of semiconductor electronic circuits using discrete and integrated circuits. Emphasis is on design and experimental verification of amplifiers switching circuits, etc. using linear active devices. Prerequisite: ECEN 306. Corequisite: ECEN 460. (F;S)

ECEN 470. Properties of Materials for Electrical Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides a study of the atomic, molecular and crystalline properties of solids as conducting, insulating and semiconducting and magnetic materials in Electrical Engineering. The emphasis is on electrical, electronic and magnetic properties and applications.  Mechanical, thermal and optical properties are also studied in the electrical engineering context. Prerequisite: ECEN 425. (F)

ECEN 475. Applied Engineering Analysis Credit 3(3-0)
This course will cover application of linear algebra, complex variable, and discrete mathematics in solving engineering problems. Prerequisites: MATH 231, 431. (F;S)

ECEN 506. Introduction to Digital Electronics Integrated Circuits Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers analysis, design and applications of basic digital integrated circuits. Prerequisite: ECEN 320.

ECEN 508. Introduction to Analog Electronics Integrated Circuits Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the analysis, design and implementation of selected analog integrated circuits. Prerequisite: ECEN 460. (F)

ECEN 510. Linear Control Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to automatic control theory. It covers control components, development of block diagrams for control systems, analysis, and computer simulations based on time and s domain. Three design methods: Bode-plot, root-locus, and pole placement are discussed. Models may be chosen by minimizing quadratic performance index, ITAE or by computer simulation. Prerequisite: ECEN 400. (F)

ECEN 521. Introduction to Embedded Systems Credit 3(3-0)
This course exposes students to the design of microprocessor-based application-specific systems. Hardware/software co-design is dealt with extensively, which includes interfacing to digital and analog peripheral devices. A popular contemporary high-level language is used for the majority of the software development, with some use of assembly language as well. An integrated development environment (IDE) popular in industry is utilized for practical experience. Several contemporary, everyday examples of embedded systems are referenced throughout the course. Prerequisite: ECEN 427.

ECEN 523. Digital Systems Design II Credit 3(3-0)
This course builds upon the experience gained in Introduction to Digital Systems by exposing students to principles, techniques, and applications of modern digital systems. Design and analysis techniques for combinational and sequential circuits will be discussed. Students will be exposed to: digital system top-down design and analysis, timing, and performance issues in digital circuits. In addition, the student will be exposed to the Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL)-based system analysis and synthesis, hardware-software co-design, data-flow models, and digital system primitives. Course includes two undergraduate projects implemented on Field Programmable Gate Arrays. Prerequisite: ECEN 423.

ECEN 524. Computer Design for Instruction-Level Parallelism Credit 3(3-0)
The complex and reduced instruction set architectures, microarchitecture design, advanced pipelining and instruction-level parallelism, memory-hierarchy design, storage systems, interconnection networks and multiprocessor design of modern computer systems are covered in this course. The design philosophies used to develop these computer systems and subsystems are also studied, modeled and analyzed with a hardware description language and other computer aided design tools. Prerequisite: ECEN 356 and 375.

ECEN 525. Introduction to Microwave Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers principles of microwave components such as transmission line, couplers, filters, power dividers, attenuators, circulators, mixers, oscillators and amplifiers. Students will be exposed to CAD tools. Prerequisite: ECEN 450.

ECEN 529. Introduction to VLSI Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces CMOS technology, MOS device characteristics, and their use in VLSI circuits. VLSI circuit building blocks such as inverters, combinational and sequential logic circuits are introduced. Interconnect and timing issues are covered. Finally, design examples including arithmetic building blocks and memory structures are presented. Prerequisites: ECEN 320 and 327.

ECEN 545. Digital Signal Processing Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the fundamental theory and application of digital signal processing including time and transform domain analysis and various digital filter design methods. Prerequisite: ECEN 400. (F)

ECEN 547. Introduction to Telecommunication Networks Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the fundamental concepts of telecommunication networks. The architecture, technology, operation, and application of telecommunication networks are discussed including design and analysis of networks for voice, data, and video applications. Prerequisite: ECEN 400. (F;S)

ECEN 557. Introduction to VLSI Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces the concept and practice of digital image processing. The topics include image representation, visual perception, quantization and sampling, image enhancement, edge analysis, two dimensional fast Fourier transform, image restoration and image understanding. Prerequisite: ECEN 400.

ECEN 570. Properties of Materials of Electrical Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides a study of the atomic, molecular and crystalline properties of solids as conducting, insulating and semiconducting and magnetic materials in Electrical Engineering. The emphasis is on electrical, electronic and magnetic properties and applications. Mechanical, thermal and optical properties are also studied in the electrical engineering context. Prerequisite: ECEN 425. (S)

ECEN 585. Selected Topics in Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This lecture course is used to introduce engineering topics of current interest to students and faculty. The subject matter will be identified before the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (F;S)

ECEN 586. Special Projects Credit 1-3 variable
This is an investigation of an engineering topic, which is arranged between a student and a faculty advisor. Project topics may be analytical and/or experimental and should encourage independent study. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (F;S)

ECEN 598. Senior Design Project I Credit 3(3-0)
This is part one of a two-part capstone design course for the undergraduate electrical and computer engineering programs. Topics covered include the design process as applied to electrical and computer  systems, application of technical design tools, and application of professional skills. Teamwork, technical writing, communications, and project management are stressed throughout the semester. Prerequisites: ECEN 433 and 466 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

ECEN 599. Senior Design Project II Credit 3(3-0)
This is a continuation of ECEN 598, Senior Design Project I. The course deals with design implementation, system block testing, interfacing, and prototype testing. Teamwork, technical writing, communications, and project management are stressed throughout the semester.Prerequisite: ECEN 598. (F;S)

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Ali Abul-Fadl
Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Idaho

Marwan Bikdash
Professor and Chair of Computational Science and Engineering
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Ward J. Collis
Emeritus Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Numan Dogan
Professor
B.S., Karadeniz Technical University, M.S., Polytechnic Institute of New York, Ph.D., University of Michigan

Christopher Doss
Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University

William Edmonson
Professor
B.S., GMI; M.S., Georgia Tech; Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Gregory C. Gilmore
Adjunct Instructor 
B.S. North Carolina State University; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology

Corey Graves
Associate Professor
B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Abdollah Homaifar
Duke Energy Eminent Professor
B.S., M.S., State University of New York-Stony Brook; Ph.D., University of Alabama

Shanthi Iyer
Professor
B.S., M.S., Delhi University; Ph.D., Indian Institute of Technology

John C. Kelly, Jr.
Associate Professor and Chairperson
B.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware

Jung Kim
Professor
B.S., Yonsei University, M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Gary Lebby
Professor
B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina, Ph.D., Clemson University

Clinton Lee
Associate Professor
B.S., California Institute of Technology; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Robert Li
Professor
B.S., Duke University; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., University of Kansas

Harold L. Martin, Sr.
Professor and Chancellor
B.S., M.S. North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

David Olson
Associate Professor
B.S., M.E., Michigan Technological University; Ph.D., University of Utah

Alvernon Walker
Associate Professor
B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Zhijian Xie
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S. University of Science and Technology of China, Ph.D. Princeton University

Chung Yu
Emeritus Professor
B.Eng., McGill University; M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University