Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/coe/caee/index.html

Sameer Hamoush, Chairperson

DEGREES OFFERED

Architectural Engineering – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Civil Engineering – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

MISSION

The mission of the Bachelor of Science program in Architectural Engineering is to provide a quality educational experience through which students develop the technical and communication competencies, awareness of the profession, and work ethic expected of an entry-level architectural engineer. The educational program also prepares students with acceptable GPA’s (typically 3.0, or higher) for admission to graduate school as an engineer or as an architect. The Educational Mission is to meet, or exceed, the educational requirements for Architectural Engineering programs as defined by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Recent graduates of the Architectural Engineering Program will distinguish themselves in their chosen discipline. They will:

  1. be assigned progressively increasing technical responsibility by their supervisor.
  2. be recognized for their interdisciplinary perspective to problem-solving and for their teamwork and leadership skills.
  3. be active in a professional society and be involved in continuing education, making progress towards professional registration.
  4. contribute to society and to the diversity of their company and their profession by actively mentoring new engineering graduates.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The Architectural Engineering major must complete 127 credit hours following the approved departmental curriculum. Majors must also satisfy all University and College of Engineering requirements. Included in the 127 semester hours are 6 semester hours of architectural engineering courses selected from one of four optional blocks – Structures, Energy and Building Environmental Systems, Construction Engineering, and Architectural Design & City and Urban Planning. To be eligible to enroll in advanced architectural design courses, a student must (a) have an accumulated GPA of 2.65 for unconditional enrollment, (2) have completed all prerequisites, and (3) be of senior standing. A student, with a GPA below 2.65, may petition the Departmental Design Committee for permission to enroll in Design III. The petition must be reviewed by the Design Committee and approved by the department before the student will be allowed to enroll in Design III.

ACCREDITATION

The undergraduate program in Architectural Engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering (BSAE) degree, is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Completion of the architectural engineering program provides training for a career in the engineering profession as related to the engineering design and construction of building systems. Training in architectural engineering prepares graduates to pursue a professional career in engineering practice or business. Graduates are also employed in offices of professional engineers engaged in building systems design which include the design of structural, mechanical, lighting, and electrical systems for buildings. In addition, graduates are employed as engineers in the offices of professionals engaged in engineering systems design for architectural projects. Architectural engineering graduates also have opportunities for careers with construction firms and building materials manufacturers where their architectural engineering training is a significant asset.

DUAL DEGREE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

Some Architectural Engineering graduates may decide to pursue careers in areas that are traditionally Civil Engineering. Employment with the NC Department of Transportation is one example. For these students, a dual degree in Architectural Engineering and Civil Engineering will enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Since the two curricula are very similar, it is possible for an Architectural Engineering student to earn a second degree in Civil Engineering by completing two additional semesters of coursework.

 

CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

MISSION

The mission of the Bachelor of Science program in Civil Engineering is to provide an educational program attuned to the unique abilities of students that will prepare them to become productive civil engineers contributing to the welfare, quality of life, protection, and advancement of the community.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

To properly fulfill the Mission, the educational objectives of the Bachelor of Science program in Civil Engineering are the following:

  1. Our graduates will be gainfully employed as civil engineers, with designations of, at least, Engineer Interns, and will demonstrate the ability to work productively in the main areas of civil engineering.
  2. a.  Our graduates will demonstrate expertise in a primary area of civil engineering and the ability to function effectively on intra-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams, or be in the process of completing post-baccalaureate studies or expanding their proficiency in civil engineering.                b.  Our graduates will continue to learn and adapt to changing technologies, procedures and concepts in civil engineering
  3. Our graduates will demonstrate that they possess the skills and knowledge necessary to function effectively in roles of leadership and service in the communities where they will live and work, and that they are contributing to the welfare, quality of life, protection, and advancement of the community.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The Civil Engineering major must complete 128 credit hours following the approved departmental curriculum. Majors must also satisfy all University and College of Engineering requirements.

The Civil Engineering program requires students to take design courses in at least four of the following major areas within Civil Engineering:

  1. Environmental Engineering
  2. Geotechnical Engineering
  3. Structural Engineering
  4. Construction Engineering
  5. Transportation Engineering
  6. Water Resources Engineering

ACCREDITATION

The undergraduate program in Civil Engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE) degree, is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Civil engineers are employed in the planning, designing, construction and management of transportation, environmental, water resources, geotechnical and structural systems. They may work in private practice, government, and industry. Many civil engineers are licensed as professional engineers in the state in which they practice. Some civil engineers are employed in universities, teaching and research, which usually requires an advanced degree. Civil engineers are in demand in construction, transportation, and government, and Bachelor of Science degree holders in Civil Engineering generally receive excellent starting salaries.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN CIVIL, ARCHITECTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

CAEE 100. Fundamentals of Civil, Architectural, and Agricultural Engineering Credit 2(2-0)
This course gives an overview of the three engineering professions housed within the CAEE department. The topics include careers in these engineering fields, professional registration, application of math to engineering, engineering design process as it applies to each program, units and measuring including both US and metric, written and oral communications, and an introduction to word processing, presentation software, and spreadsheets. (F;S)

CAEE 101. Graphics in CAEE Credit 2(0-4)
This course is critical to the development of visualization skills, which are important in engineering. Covered by the course are hand drawing skills including drafting, freehand sketching, perspective sketching, and lettering. Visualization skills are developed by stressing freehand techniques. Drafting skills will include plans, elevations, details, scaling, and units (US and Metric) and will relate to the three professions housed in the department. In addition to orthographic projections, oblique and isometric drawings will be taught. A brief introduction to computer graphics package such as AutoCAD will also be presented. (F;S)

CAEE 102. Fundamentals of Computer Applications for Civil, and Architectural Engineering Credit 2(0-4)
This course introduces the student to computer hardware and software and to basic operating systems. Spread sheet programs and other computational packages, such as MathCAD, are introduced and applied to the solution of practical engineering problems. Programming and algorithms are introduced as well as the Visual Basic language. (F;S)

CAEE 121. CAEE Colloquium II Credit 1(1-0)
This course includes lectures, seminars and activities important to the retention and matriculation of civil and architectural engineering students. Topics covered include learning styles, group dynamics, and career development. Students are also provided with group advisement regarding department, college, and university-level policies and procedures. (S)

CAEE 202. Sophomore Colloquium Credit 0(0-1)
This colloquium assists students in their preparation for the End-of-Year exam required for CAEE Sophomores. Topics covered include: Math, Chemistry, Statics, Dynamics, and Strength of Materials. The course is pass/fail. Prerequisite: None. (SS)

CAEE 204. Fundamentals of Surveying Credit 3(2-3)
This course covers the theory and practice of plane, boundary, and topographic surveying instruments, theory of measurements, differential and profile leveling, traverse calculations, and topographical surveying and mapping. An introduction to horizontal and vertical roadway layout, site planning and development, and an overview of Geographic Information Systems and Global Posting Systems is also included. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

CAEE 215. Computer Aided Design Credit 2(0-4)
This course provides an introduction to a computer based design/drawing application such as AutoCAD. The student will learn how to use computers to develop 2D presentation drawings. Prerequisites: CAEE 102 and CAEE major or consent of the instructor. (F;SS)

CAEE 231. Mechanics I-Statics Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces the theory and application of engineering mechanics as it relates to statically determinant systems. Topics include basic forces, free body diagrams, vectors, resultants, equilibrium, pulley systems, rigid bodies, truss analysis, frame, pulleys, machines, internal forces in structural members, friction, center of gravity and centroids, moment of inertia, and composite bodies and areas. Prerequisites: MATH 131, PHYS 241 and CAEE 101. (F;S)

CAAE 232. Engineering Solid Mechanics I Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers stress and strain, axial and torsional loadings, bending moment and shear distributions from transverse loads, combined stress analysis, deformation and deflection of shafts and beams, transformation of stress and strain, column buckling, and an introduction of the analysis of statically determinate beams. Prerequisites: CAEE 231 and MATH 132. (F;S)

CAEE 240. Numerical Methods, Systems, and Economic Decision Analysis Credit 2(0-6)
This course covers linear algebra, matrix theory, manipulation of polynomials, interpolation, differentiation and integration.  Computational methods for the solution of mathematical problems are presented. (F;S)

CAEE 302. Junior Colloquium Credit 0(0-1)
This colloquium assists students in their preparation for the End-of-Year exam required for CAAE Juniors. Topics covered include: Math, Chemistry, Statics, Dynamics, and Strength of Materials, Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Electrical Circuits, Engineering Economics. The course is pass/fail. Prerequisite: None. (SS)

CAEE 304. Applications of Statistics, Reliability and Decision Theory in Civil Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course will introduce the students to probability theory and statistics. Reliability theory and Decision analyses are introduced. The course will incorporate simplified examples of applications of decision analysis, modeling of system response, and system reliability in the different areas of the civil and architectural engineering. The use of common statistical tools in the selection of design parameters will be presented. Students will be introduced to concepts of sampling distributions and confidence intervals. Prerequisites: Junior standing. (S)

CAEE 325. Structural Analysis Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces the concepts of structural analysis for determinate and indeterminate structural systems using both hand calculations and computer applications. Prerequisite: CAEE 232. (F;S)

CAEE 330. Construction Materials Credit 3(3-0)
The course covers the manufacture and properties of mineral and bituminous cements and mineral aggregates. It explores the mechanical and chemical properties of Portland cement concrete, bituminous concrete, masonry units, and timber products. Also, this course will introduce the student to the use of construction materials in buildings. Prerequisites: CAEE 204 and CAEE 232. (F)

CAEE 334. Engineering Mechanics II Credit 2(2-0)
This course covers the basic principles of classical mechanics applied to the motion of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies; kinematics; rectilinear and curvilinear motions; kinetics: force, mass, and acceleration; energy and momentum principles. Topics include coordinate systems, work-energy, impulse-momentum, and selected topics from three-dimensional rigid bodies. Prerequisite: CAEE 231. (F;S)

CAEE 335. Construction Materials Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This course offers an introduction to testing techniques for construction materials including concrete, masonry, wood, and bitumen and introduce the student to experimental to evaluate behavior of  structural systems such as reinforce structural members. Prerequisite: CAEE 232. Corequisites: CIEN 330. (F)

CAEE 350. Junior Fundamentals Review Seminar Credit 1(0-2)
This course will provide a review of the math, science, and engineering science concepts covered on the CAAE Junior Competency Exam. The course will culminate in re-examination using the CAAE Junior Competency Exam. The course is pass/fail. Prerequisite: Consent of department chairperson. (SS)

CAEE 362. Engineering Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics Credit 3(3-0)
This is the first level engineering fluid mechanics course which also integrates fundamental hydraulics concepts and applications pertinent to Civil, Architectural, and Agricultural Engineering. Topics include properties of fluids, hydrostatic pressure and manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, Pascal’s Law, Archimedes’ Principle, the Bernoulli and energy equation for steady state flow, Reynolds transport theorem, energy and hydraulic grade lines, head loss calculations, momentum principle, flow and velocity measurement, pumps, branched and looped pipe systems and analysis of open channel flow, sub and super-critical flow, hydraulic jump, and dimension analysis. Prerequisites: CAEE 231 and MATH 231. (F;S)

CAEE 363. Engineering Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This course includes a set of laboratory exercises designed to reinforce and demonstrate engineering fluid mechanics and hydraulics concepts. Topics include graphical analyses of experimental data, fluid properties, manometry, and hydrostatic forces on surfaces. Bernoulli and energy equations demonstrations, impact of a jet, orifice flow and coefficients of contraction, velocity and discharge, pipe friction, broad and sharp-crested weirs, water surface profiles, Hydraulic jump, and flow through sills and throats. Prerequisite: CAEE 362 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

CAEE 401. Engineering Topics Review II Credit 0(0-2)
This course is a review course for students taking the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam. Prerequisite: CAEE 232. (F;S)

CAEE 430. Structural Design in Steel Credit 3(3-0)
This course will introduce the students to the preliminary design of structural systems and element design in structural steel. The students will be taught to define structural system layouts, structural loads and design simply supported steel joists, beams, and columns. Prerequisite: CAEE 232. Corequisite: CAEE 325. (F;S)

CAEE 436. Reinforced Concrete Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of AREN 430 emphasizing the concepts of reinforced concrete theory. The design of doubly reinforced beams, continuous beams, and beam-column behavior of concrete columns is addressed. Such topics as beam deflections, reinforcing bar bond stresses, and development lengths are also presented. Prerequisites: CAEE 430 and senior standing or consent of instructor. (F;S)

CAEE 450. Construction Engineering & Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to engineering project development project, with a particular emphasis on project systems integration and process execution and engineered building and structures program management. To introduce the students to concept of project management, students will be introduced to the construction project process, legal relationships and project control and cost implications. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent or instructor. (F;S)

CAEE 480. Geospatial Data Concepts and Applications Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides a broad overview of the geospatial data, its acquisition, use and maintenance for various types of applications. It includes the integration of geographic information systems (GIS), the global positioning system (GPS), photogrammetry, and remote sensing and image analysis. GIS, GPS, airborne and satellite imagery, and the use of applicable software and equipment are also covered. Prerequisites: BOIE 216, GEOM 310 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

CAEE 481. Construction Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to construction engineering emphasizing project site and field engineering and construction cost estimating, including project planning methodology, management and material testing. The course will also introduce construction equipment and methods, contracts, project specifications, general conditions and requirements including project safety and environmental health and other related topics. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (DEMAND)

CAEE 482. Construction Project Credit 3(1-4)
This course is an introduction to engineering project management, with particular emphasis placed on the project planning and control of the engineered design project and systems including buildings and other engineered structures. Topics covered include, project planning, control, resource leveling and optimization. Manual and automated methods will be addressed. Prerequisite: CAEE 481. (S)

CAEE 498. Special Projects in Civil and Architectural Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
Study is arranged on  special civil and architectural engineering projects of interest to students and faculty. Projects discussed can be design, analysis or experimental studies. (DEMAND)

CAEE 499. Special Topics in Civil and Architectural Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
Study is arranged on a special civil and architectural engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. Topics are to reflect new technologies on the civil and architectural engineering areas. (DEMAND)

CAEE 500. General Engineering Topics Review Credit 1(0-3)
The course covers and reviews the engineering topics included in the General Engineering Sections of the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. The course emphasizes extensive problem solving and helps students prepare for the FE exam. Prerequisite/Corequisite: Senior standing in architectural engineering, civil engineering, or agricultural engineering. (F;S;SS on DEMAND) 

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING

AREN 112. History of American Architecture Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an illustrated lecture course. It provides an analytical study of the major architectural and engineering developments that have shaped the American built environment from the arrival of the Europeans to the present. (F)

AREN 215. Advanced CAD and BIM Applications for Architectural Engineers Credit 2(0-4)
This course presents an advanced series of problems for study of space analysis, space organization, form and function. The student applies the integration of design, construction methods, and methods of the organization of structural components to a design project. Prerequisite: CAEE 101. (S;F)

AREN 221. Building Sanitation and Fire Protection Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of the following: waste water, water supply and distribution; plumbing systems and fixtures; soil, water and venting systems; pipe sizing fire protection systems for buildings and pumps, sprinklers, gravity and pressure vessels, and controls. Lecture-problems course. (S)

AREN 231. Materials and Methods of Construction Credit 3(3-0)
This course will introduce the student to the use of construction materials in buildings. An evaluation of both the function and form of the major building systems such as walls, floors and roofs will be presented. (F)

AREN 326. Structural Engineering Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This laboratory course will introduce the student to laboratory methods in experimental structural analysis and tests to reinforce structural behavior. Prerequisite: CAEE 232. Corequisite: CAEE 325. (F;S)

AREN 342. Fundamentals of Illuminating Engineering Credit 2(2-0)
A study of the basic principles of illumination, lighting concepts, analysis, design, and the application of these principles to luminous environments. Topics include physics of light, vision, and visibility, units and terminology, light sources, numerical methods, and the application of these principles to lighting design. Prerequisites: PHYS 242, AREN major or consent of the instructor. Corequisite: AREN 344. (F)

AREN 343. Heat Transfer and Applied Thermodynamics Credit 2(2-0)
This course provides the concepts of thermodynamics and heat transfer. Throughout the course, applications of these concepts will be discussed. In particular, real world applications include heating and cooling buildings, and refrigeration. Specifically, the course covers the various forms of energy, how energy is transformed from one form to another, and the laws that govern energy transfer. Prerequisite: MEEN 241.(F)

AREN 344. Lighting and Electrical Power Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This laboratory provides hands on experiences that supplement the topics presented in AREN 448. Corequisite: AREN 348. (F;S)

AREN 345. Electrical Systems for Buildings Credit 2(2-0)
This course includes the analysis and design of electrical systems utilizing the National Electrical Code. The topics include basic circuits, ac and dc single phase, three-phase power, transients, capacitance and inductance, branch circuits, panelboards, motors, and electrical distribution in buildings. The course also covers design topics of system sizing, overcurrent protection, and voltage drop as they apply to electrical systems design for a building. Prerequisites: MATH 132 and PHYS 242, AREN major or consent of the instructor. Corequisite: AREN 347. (S)

AREN 347. Electrical Systems for Buildings Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This laboratory provides hands on experiences that supplement the topics presented in AREN 445. Corequisite: AREN 345. (F;S)

AREN 348. Fundamentals of Illumination and Electrical Power Credit 3(3-0)
This course combines the basic study of building lighting and electrical distribution systems. Topics include light sources, numerical methods for lighting design, energy efficiency, basic electric circuits, single and three phase power, panel boards, circuit design and protection, motors loads, and transformers. Prerequisite: 242. Corequisite: AREN 344. (F;S)

AREN 361. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Principles Credit 2(2-0)
This course is the study of the basic concepts of energy and building systems design. The course covers the subjects of psychrometrics and human comfort in buildings. The topics include heat transfer functions, heating loads, cooling loads, and the refrigeration cycle. Prerequisites: MATH 131 and PHYS 242. Corequisite: AREN 363. (S)

AREN 363. HVAC Principles / Systems Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This laboratory provides hands on experiences that supplement the topics presented in AREN 364. Corequisite: AREN 364. (S;F)

AREN 364. HVAC Principles and Systems Credit 2(2-0)
This course is the study of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) principles and systems. Topics include heating loads, cooling loads, psychrometrics, the refrigeration cycle, energy efficiency; residential, commercial, and industrial HVAC systems; and air distribution. Prerequisites: PHYS 242, AREN 343, Corequisite: AREN 363. (F;S)

AREN 382. Architectural Design I Credit 3(0-6)
The student is introduced to the basic fundamentals of design, which includes space relationships, form, and visible structure. The course includes perspective drawing, plans, elevations, sections, shades, and shadows. Prerequisites: MATH 132, CAEE 232, and junior standing. (F)

AREN 383. Architectural Design II Credit 3(0-6)
This course presents a series of problems in space organization and planning. Presentation composition and the integration of structures in the design process are studied. Prerequisite: AREN 382 or junior standing. (S)

AREN 462. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems Credit 2(2-0)
This course includes heating, ventilating, and central air conditioning system components, all air and water systems, and packaged systems. It covers the introduction to air-side and water-side system design concepts, space air diffusion, and energy recovery systems. Prerequisites: AREN 361, AREN major or consent of the instructor. Corequisite: AREN 464. (F)

AREN 464. HVAC Systems Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This laboratory provides hands on experiences that supplement the topics presented in AREN 462. Corequisite: AREN 462. (F;S)

AREN 470. Energy and the Environment Credit 3(3-0)
The course includes readings and discussions about energy, its origins, supply, transportation and use. The effect of fossil fuels on the environment and environmental protection regulations are discussed. Renewable energy and the impact of energy costs on economic growth are investigated. Prerequisite Senior standing or Consent of Instructor. (DEMAND)

AREN 472. Energy Conservation in Buildings Credit 3(3-0)
The energy use patterns in schools and hospitals are studied in terms of the relevant IES and ASHRAE Standards. The course presents various utility rate structures and energy auditing techniques along with the effect of operation and maintenance on the building energy use. Various retrofit options and computerized energy management systems are investigated culminating in design projects. Prerequisite: AREN 364, AREN 448, or Consent of instructor.

AREN 485. Senior Project I - Design Development Credit 3(0-6)
This course teaches students how to prepare the preliminary and design development documents for a building project. The materials covered include engineering calculations, preliminary and design development drawings, and preliminary cost estimate. Computer programs are used to assist the students with program development, floor plan development, site plan development, and the conceptual cost estimate. Prerequisites: Senior standing, AREN  382, CAEE 430, AREN 364, and 348 or consent of chairperson. Corequisite: AREN 462. (F)

AREN 486. Senior Project II - Construction Documents Credit 3(0-6)
This course teaches the student how to prepare a final set of discipline specific construction documents, including engineering calculations production drawings, and specifications. The student will discuss contracts, ethics, and construction administration as they relate to the project. Prerequisite: Senior standing, AREN 364,  or AREN 383, or CAEE 430, or AREN 348 or consent of chairperson. (S)

AREN 498. HVAC Design and Plumbing Systems Credit 3(3-0)
The course offers a complete and practical introduction to the design and operation of mechanical and plumbing systems in buildings. Prerequisite: AREN 364. (F;S)

AREN 542. Lighting Applications Credit 3(0-6)
This course applies the principles of lighting design to the engineering of lighting systems. It also develops methodology for solving problems in both interior and exterior lighting. (DEMAND)

AREN 545. Electrical Systems for Buildings II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of AREN 542. It covers the design of safe and reliable electrical distribution systems for commercial and industrial buildings. The topics included are circuit protection, feeder and branch circuit design, and fault analysis. Prerequisite: AREN 448.

AREN 550. Engineering Project Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to engineering project management, with particular emphasis placed on the planning and control of the engineering design of buildings. Topics covered include estimating, contracts, planning, resource leveling, and project control. Manual and automated methods will be addressed. Prerequisites: AREN 231, senior standing or consent or instructor. (F;S)

AREN 554. Facilities Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course deals with long range and master planning for facilities, including space forecasting, project management, and post occupancy evaluation. (DEMAND)

AREN 562. HVAC Systems Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course addresses the design methodology, sizing, and selection techniques of pumps, fans, heat-exchanges, and air washers, cooling towers and terminal units. Duct and pipe design methods are covered. Primary and secondary hydronic systems are covered, including system air-control techniques. Design projects are required. Prerequisite:  AREN 364 and Senior standing. (DEMAND)

AREN 570. Energy and the Environment Credit 3(3-0)
The course includes readings and discussions about energy, its origins, supply, transportation and use. The effect of fossil fuels on the environment and environmental protection regulations are discussed. Renewable energy and the impact of energy costs on economic growth are investigated. Prerequisite Senior standing or Consent of Instructor. (DEMAND)

AREN 572. Energy Conservation in Buildings Credit 3(3-0)
The energy use patterns in schools and hospitals are studied in terms of the relevant IES and ASHRAE Standards. The course presents various utility rate structures and energy auditing techniques along with the effect of operation and maintenance on the building energy use. Various retrofit options and computerized energy management systems are investigated culminating in design projects. Prerequisite: AREN 364, AREN 448, or Consent of instructor.

AREN 575. Energy Management for Buildings Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves the study of renewable and nonrenewable energy sources for buildings, energy estimating methods (manual and automated) optimizing building envelop design and comparative energy requirements for various HVAC systems. The student utilizes the solar energy F-chart method and design of efficient lighting and electrical systems to solve design problems. Topics include Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCS) waste heat recovery, energy audit procedures for existing buildings, life cycle cost and techniques. Prerequisite: Senior Standing or Consent of Instructor.

AREN 582. Architectural Design III Credit 3(0-6)
This course presents a series of problems for study of space analysis, space organization, form and function. The student learns how to integrate the architectural and the structural components. The course introduces the student to computer-aided drafting and design. Prerequisite:AREN 483, MEEN 336, Senior standing.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CIEN 101. Civil Engineering Professional Issues & Problem Solving Credit 1(0-2)
This course provides the student with some exposure to civil and environmental engineering problems. Lectures from faculty and consulting engineers are components of this course as well as working in teams and presentation techniques. This course will provide help in engineering applications of calculus, chemistry, and physics. In addition, issues related to civil engineering licensure and professional practice will be discussed. Prerequisite: Freshman standing. (F;S)

CIEN 102. Professional Issues & Problems in Civil Engineering Credit 1(0-2)
This course provides the student with exposure to civil and environmental engineering issues and problems. This is accomplished with lectures from faculty and professional engineers and other practicing civil engineers. This course will provide help in engineering applications of Calculus II, and/or Physics I and Chemistry. Prerequisite: Freshman standing. (F;S)

CIEN 212. Fundamental Principles in Environmental Engineering Credit 2(2-0)
This course is an introduction of biological, chemical, and physical principles that are foundational in environmental engineering. Topics include mass balance, biological and microbiological processes, solution precipitation reactions, Henry’s law, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and mass transfer. Prerequisites: CHEM 106, MATH 131 and 132. Corequisite: MATH 431. (F;S)

CIEN 280. Civil Engineering Graphics and Computer Aided Design Credit 1(0-2)
This course is critical to the development of important visualization skills in Civil Engineering (CE). Covered in the course are hand-drawing skills including engineering lettering, orthographic projections, oblique and isometric drawings. A brief introduction to computer graphics package such as AutoCAD will also be presented. This course will also provide an introduction to a computer based design/drawing application such as AutoDesk and AutoCAD or Bentley Microstation. A land-based design software package such as Land Development Desktop (LDD) will be used to enter, create, edit and analyze point, line and polygon objects relevant to CE applications. Basic functions include creating surfaces, contours, calculation of cut and fill volumes and the generation of finished cross-sections. Prerequisites: CAAE 100, CIEN 101 (F;S)

CIEN 281. Civil Engineering Land CAD Credits1(0-2)
A land-based design software package such as Land Development Desktop (LDD) will be used to enter, create, edit and analyze point, line and polygon objects relevant to CE applications. Basic functions include creating surfaces, contours, calculation of cut and fill volumes and the generation of finished cross-sections. Prerequisites: CAEE 101. (F;S)

CIEN 310. Environmental Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course provides an introduction to environmental pollution. Topics include physical, chemical and biological water quality parameters, water purification processes in natural systems, air pollution and solid waste management, and general design of waste control systems. Prerequisite: CIEN 212. (F;S)

CIEN 311. Environmental Engineering Laboratory Credit 1(0-3)
This course provides selected experiments on the measurement of environmental pollutants. Topics include use of microscope, Gram stain, conform analysis, pH, alkalinity, hardness, DO, BOD, and control of microorganisms. Corequisite: CIEN 310. (F)

CIEN 320. Geotechnical Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces the following topics: engineering mechanics and properties of soils, stresses and settlements in soils, earth pressures on structures, stability of slopes and embankments, and fundamentals of foundation selection and design. Prerequisites: CAEE 362 and MATH 431. (S)

CIEN 321. Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory Credit 1(0-3)
This course will provide laboratory experiences in soil identification, classification, permeability, consolidation, indexing, and laboratory evaluation of shear and bearing strength of soils. Prerequisites: CAEE 362. Corequisite: CIEN 320. (S)

CIEN 330. Construction Materials Credit 3(3-0)
The course covers the manufacture and properties of mineral and bituminous cements and mineral aggregates. It explores the mechanical and chemical properties of Portland cement concrete, bituminous concrete, masonry units, and timber products. Prerequisites: CIEN 204 and CAEE 232. (F)

CIEN 335. Construction Materials Laboratory Credit 1(0-2)
This course offers an introduction to testing techniques for construction materials including concrete, masonry, wood, and bitumen. Prerequisite: CAAE 232. Corequisite: CIEN 330. (F)

CIEN 350. Transportation Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on one mode of transportation, highway engineering. The major aspects of highway engineering covered are administration and finance, traffic engineering, traffic operations and safety, geometric design, highway materials, structural design, and highway planning and economics. Corequisite: CAEE 330. (S)

CIEN 364. Engineering Hydrology Credit 3(3-0)
This is a study of hydrologic cycle with emphasis on the application of surface and subsurface hydrology in water systems. Topics include hydrologic cycle and hydrologic abstractions, Rainfall-runoff relationships, characterization of watersheds, unit hydrograph analysis, stream flow measurement, flood routing, storm water management and design of detention systems, and frequency analysis of hydrologic data. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (S)

CIEN 366. Hydraulics and Hydrology Credits 3(2-2)
This is an integrated course in basic hydraulics and hydrologic applications. Topics include fluid statics, the continuity, momentum, and energy equations, friction, headloss, pressurized and open channel flow, rainfall, abstractions, travel time, runoff, municipal regulations, stormwater sewer design, and stormwater management design. Prerequisites: MATH 132 and PHYS 226. (F;S;SS)

CIEN 403. Senior Seminar Credit 1(0-2)
This course is used to prepare the student for the Senior Exam, which is given as the final exam for the course. Included also are discussions on the ethics and professionalism. Each student prepares and presents to the class an original paper on a topic of engineering importance. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F)

CIEN 404. Applications of Statistics, Reliability and Decision Theory in Civil Engineering Credit 2(2-0)
This course will introduce the students to probability theory and statistics. Reliability theory and Decision analyses are introduced. The course will incorporate simplified examples of applications of decision analysis, modeling of system response, and system reliability in the different areas of the civil engineering curriculum. The use of common statistical tools in the selection of design parameters will be presented. Prerequisites: Senior standing. (S)

CIEN 410. Environmental Engineering Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course defines the analysis and design of water and wastewater treatment systems. Topics included in the course are analysis and functional design of physical, chemical and biological treatment processes, pump stations, and sludge treatment processes. CIEN 310. (S)

CIEN 416. Solid Waste Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of the collection, storage, transport and disposal of solid wastes. Examination of various engineering alternatives with appropriate consideration for air and water pollution control and land reclamation will take place. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (DEMAND)

CIEN 420. Geotechnical Engineering II Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a continuation of CIEN 320 with emphasis on the behavior and design of retaining walls and shallow and deep foundations. Also, it will introduce the following topics: earth pressure, bearing capacity, settlement, behavior and design of anchored bulkheads, excavation bracing and buried structures, and response of deep foundations to vertical and horizontal loads. Prerequisites: CIEN 320 and 321. (F)

CIEN 460. Water Resources Engineering Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves the application of hydrologic and hydraulic principles in the analysis and design of water resources systems. The measurement of ground water parameters and general water quality parameters is covered. Topics covered include water supply and distribution, reservoirs, water law, hydroelectric power, flood control, water resources planning and development, and storm water drainage. The use of HEC-RAS software for flood plain modeling is introduced. Prerequisites: CIEN 364 and CAEE 363. (F;S)

CIEN 480. Construction Engineering Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an introduction to construction engineering emphasizing heavy and highway construction; organization of construction industry; construction equipment, methods, and management; safety and environmental health in construction; and project planning and scheduling. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (DEMAND)

CIEN 482. Construction Project Credit 3(1-4)
This course provides an integrated approach by student teams to designing, estimating, planning, scheduling and management of construction projects. Prerequisite: CIEN 480. (DEMAND)

CIEN 498. Civil Engineering Systems Design I Credit 1(0-3)
In this course students work in teams to solve a practical and comprehensive civil engineering design project. Real world parameters including local codes, ordinances, and pertinent engineering practices are emphasized. Professional-level team presentation of civil engineering design projects using modern presentation tools/software is required. A final report and presentation are required. Corequisite: At least 2 of: CIEN 410, 420, 450, 460, CAEE 430, 436. (F;S)

CIEN 499. Civil Engineering Systems Design II (Capstone) Credit 2(0-4)
This is the capstone design course for the Civil Engineering program. Team solution, working with inter/intra-disciplinary sub-teams, and professional-level team presentation and reporting are emphasized. A comprehensive final report with professional-quality drawings and a presentation to a panel of faculty and local professionals is required. Prerequisite: CIEN 498. (F;S)

CIEN 522. Foundation Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course emphasizes the design of foundations for structural systems using geotechnical analysis and subsurface explorations. Designs considered include shallow and deep foundations, retaining structures, earth slope stability systems, and soil and site improvements. Prerequisite: CIEN 320. (DEMAND)

CIEN 540. Structural Engineering Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course will introduce the student to the design of reinforced concrete, steel, and timber structures. Consideration will be given to simple structural systems as designed for each material. Prerequisite: CIEN 340. (S)

CIEN 550. Transportation Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces students to the transportation design process through a series of comprehensive transportation design projects. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of existing facilities and creation of efficient new facilities through transportation systems management techniques. Energy, environment, mobility and community impacts are considered as measures of effectiveness in the design process. Prerequisite: CIEN 350. (F)

CIEN 560. Water Resources Engineering Design Credit 3(2-2)
This course involves the application of hydrologic and hydraulic principles in the analysis and design of water resources systems. The measurement of ground water parameters and general water quality parameters is covered. Topics covered include water supply and distribution, reservoirs, water law, hydroelectric power, flood control, water resources planning and development, and storm water drainage. The use of HEC-RAS software for flood plain modeling is introduced. Prerequisites: CIEN 366 or equivalent; and CAAE 363. (F;S)

CIEN 570. Construction Design Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers construction engineering design applications in the construction of buildings, highways, and other civil and industrial facilities. Emphasized materials include Portland cement concrete mix design and asphalt cement mix design. Construction problem solutions include crane selection, positioning, and loading; scheduling of construction materials and personnel; and computer aided design and construction management. Prerequisites: CIEN 330, CIEN 335, CAEE 325, and CIEN 341. Corequisites: CIEN 320 and 321. (DEMAND)

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Taher Abu-Lebdeh
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Yarmouk University, Jordan; Ph.D., Louisiana State University; Professional Engineer

Ronnie S. Bailey
Associate Professor
B.A., Howard University; M.U.P., University of Wisconsin

Shoou-Yuh Chang
Professor and DOE Samuel Massie Chair
B.S., M.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Professional Engineer

Wonchang Choi
Assistant Professor
B.S., Kyung-hee University; B.S., M.S., Hong-ik university; Ph.D., North Carolina State University

Ellie Fini
Assistant Professor
B.S., Isfahan University of Technology; B.S., M.S., Sharif University of Technology ; Ph.D., University of  Illinois Urbana Champaign

Sameer A. Hamoush
Professor
B.S., University of Damascus; M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Professional Engineer

Manoj K. Jha
Assistant Professor
B.E., Tribhuva University; M.E. Asian Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University

Stephanie Luster-Teasley
Assistant Professor of Civil and Chemical Engineering
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University

Ahmed  Megri
Assistant Professor
B.S., Constantine University (Algeria), M.S. and Ph.D., INSA (Lyon Institute of Technology) at Lyon (France), HDR (Habilitation), Pierre-and-Marie-Curie University, Sorbonne Universities (Paris VI), France

Nabil Nassif
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of Damascus; B.S., M.S., University of Damascus; Ph.D., Quebec University, Canada

Miguel Picornell
Professor
B.S., Madrid Polytechnic University; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University; Professional Engineer

Robert Powell
Assistant Professor
B.S., Stanford University; M.Arch., M.I.T.

Harmohindar Singh
Professor of Architectural and Mechanical Engineering and Director, Center for Energy Research and Training
B.Sc., M.Sc., Punjab University; M.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University; Professional Engineer

Points of Pride