Department of Journalism & Mass Communication

http://www.ncat.edu/academics/schools-colleges1/cas/jomc/index.html

Gail Wiggins, Interim Chairperson

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication are as follows:

  1. to develop in students the speaking and writing skills they apply in general communication and in professional journalism and mass communication;
  2. to develop the expertise of students in their professional specialties, and provide them the opportunity to integrate multiple skill sets, in journalism and mass communication;
  3. to prepare students for employment and leadership in local, national and global media markets and to pursue career advancement and graduate study;
  4. to cultivate the practice of seeking interdisciplinary knowledge in students, and help them acquire and apply analytical and critical skills in developing views on issues;
  5. to prepare students to transcend professional and other boundaries individually and collaboratively in addressing situations, responsibilities and challenges;
  6. to cultivate in students an understanding of the historical, cultural, legal, ethical and moral contexts in which they apply their knowledge and professional skills.

DEGREES OFFERED

Journalism and Mass Communication (Mass Media Production) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Journalism and Mass Communication (Multimedia Journalism) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)
Journalism and Mass Communication (Public Relations) – Bachelor of Science (Curriculum Guide)

MINORS OFFERED

Journalism and Mass Communication (Mass Media Production) – 18 Credit Hours
Journalism and Mass Communication (Multimedia Journalism) – 18 Credit Hours
Journalism and Mass Communication (Public Relations) – 18 Credit Hours

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The admission of students into the undergraduate degree programs in Journalism and Mass Communication is based upon the general admission requirements of the University. All students are expected to maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 overall and 2.5 in the major.

The admission of students for a minor in Journalism and Mass Communication is based upon the general requirements for minors of the University. All students are expected to have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.2 to declare a minor in Journalism and Mass Communication. They must make a grade of 70 or better in the Grammar Proficiency Examination, but are exempt from the Exit Exam.

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

The Journalism and Mass Communication major must complete a minimum of 124 to 125 (depending on concentration) semester hours of University courses. Included are 42 semester hours of courses in the major. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in these major courses.

All majors must meet certain prerequisites prior to beginning sophomore-level courses in their chosen concentrations.

Majors must demonstrate computer literacy skills as defined by the College of Arts and Sciences. They also must:

     a.   Make a grade of 70 or better in the Grammar Proficiency Examination.
     b.   Make a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better in the first year of courses.
     c.   Make a “C” or better in ENGL 100 and ENGL 101.

A student admitted in the Journalism and Mass Communication program must successfully complete a minimum of 124 to - 125 (depending on concentration) hours in order to receive the bachelor of science and:

    a.   Maintain a minimum 2.5 grade point average in courses in the major.
    b.   Have a combined Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score of 800 (in-state students) or-950 (out-of–state students) and achieve a high school cumulative grade point average of “B” or better.
    c.   If criteria A and B are not met, a student may enter the University as “Undecided;” when the student achieves the cumulative GPA of 2.5, he or she may be admitted as a Journalism and Mass Communication major.
    d.   Successfully complete the required Professional Development Seminar course (JOMC 591).
    e.   Complete an internship with an approved media organization (JOMC 598).
    f.   Complete the following practicum courses with a grade of “C” or better:
         1.   Mass Media Production (1 Practicum + Mass Communication Professional Development Seminar + Mass Communication Internship)
         2.   Multimedia Journalism (1 Practicum + Mass Communication Professional Development Seminar + Mass Communication Internship)
         3.   Public Relations (1 Practicum + Mass Communication Professional Development Seminar + Mass Communication Internship)
    g.   The department administers an exit examination to students pursuing a degree in Journalism and Mass Communication. The examination emphasizes major principles and skills in the  concentration classes: Mass Media Production, Multimedia Journalism and Public Relations. Students must pass the examination before graduating from the university. The test will be given in the junior year and may be repeated until passed.
    h.   Repeat any major course in which a grade of “D” or lower was achieved and receive a grade of “C” or better.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

A bachelor of science degree in Journalism and Mass Communication will prepare students for careers in research, teaching, management, public relations, and corporate communication. Corporations, consulting firms, non-profit organizations, educational institutions, and state, federal and local government agencies may provide job opportunities.Careers in the Journalism and Mass Communication industry continue to expand. With the development of new media and modern technology, increasingly more  professional employment opportunities are becoming available.

MINORS IN JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION

Minor Field of Undergraduate Study Policy – The purpose of this policy is to establish minor fields of study at North Carolina A&T State University. The policy states that a minor may be offered only in a field for which there is a corresponding major or authorized undergraduate certificate program; an academic minor shall consist of at least 18 credits in an area apart from the major concentration of the students baccalaureate degree program; a minimum of 12 of the 18 minor credits must be in courses at the 200-level or above; a student must complete at least 24 hours of academic credits before declaring a minor and must have a minimum GPA of 2.2; and a student may not have more than two minors regardless of the student's major. The Faculty Senate Curriculum Committee must approve all minors. This policy is consistent with other institutions in the UNC System. The minor will be printed on the transcript and not the diploma.

JOMC Minor Core Classes (9 credit hours): JOMC 220 (Reporting and Writing Across Platforms), JOMC 309 (Introduction to Multimedia), and JOMC 493 (Communication Law and Ethics). Pick one of the following concentrations:

  1. Mass Media Production: JOMC 405 (Introduction to Radio and Digital Audio Production), JOMC 406 (Introduction to Video Production), and JOMC 419 (Video Nonlinear Editing). Total 18 credit hours.
  2. Multimedia Journalism: JOMC 299 (Introduction to Video Production and Editing), JOMC 324 (Editing for Online and Print Media), and JOMC 425 (Electronic News Writing) or JOMC 430 (Advanced Reporting and Writing). Total 18 credit hours.
  3. Public Relations: JOMC 276 (Introduction to Public Relations), JOMC 330 (Public Relations Writing), and JOMC 390 (Public Relations Case Studies). Total 18 credit hours.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION

JOMC 202. Interactive Communication in the Digital World Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a survey of mass media in the digital world – including newspapers, magazines, radio, television and multimedia. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 203. Social Media Credit 3(3-0)
This course is the study of traditional and emerging communication-related theories and concepts that help explain the popularity of social media primarily among young people. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 220. Reporting and Writing Across Media Platforms Credit 3(2-2)
This course is a study and practice of writing leads and elements of news stories across media platforms including copy for newspapers, radio, television and online. Students must pass the Grammar Proficiency Exam to complete this course. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 231. Practicum II Credit 1(0-2)
Students serve on the staffs of campus media organizations such as the newspaper, television studio, radio station, or
university public relations office. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 240. Media History Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines the relationship between the media and United States history. It recognizes the significance of
alternative media such as minority and non-traditional media, and analyses the relationships between media and government to explore and understand the roles they play in history. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 245. Digital Information Sources Credit 3(2-2)
This course involves instruction and practice in utilizing libraries, databases, government records and the Internet for the purpose of obtaining from electronic sources information used by professional communicators. Prerequisite: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 255. On-Air Delivery Credit 2(2-0)
This course emphasizes performance skills essential to successful communication through the electronic media. It focuses on the analysis and delivery of copy, voice quality, guidelines for pronunciation, and techniques for specialized announcing. Prerequisite: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 276. Introduction to Public Relations (Formerly JOMC 476) Credit 3(3-0)
This course will emphasize internal and external public relations concepts for corporate, government and non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 299. Introduction to Video Production and Editing Credit 3(2-2)
The course is an introduction to basic video production and editing. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 300. Photojournalism Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves instruction and practice in photographing and videotaping with an emphasis on journalism techniques. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 302. Minorities in Mass Media Credit 3(3-0)
This course presents an overview of past and present contributions of minorities in the areas of film, radio, television, newspapers and magazines. It also examines the roles of minorities in contemporary media, with an emphasis on career opportunities for minorities. Open to university. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 303. Mass Communication Research Methods Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces students to social science research methods commonly used to develop and implement mass communication research. lt covers research design, and data collection, analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 309. Introduction to Multimedia Credit 3(1-4)
This course presents the basic production elements of multimedia content and production. It develops an understanding of the ethics and application of audio and video production, still photography and the Internet. Prerequisite: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 324. Editing for Print and Online Media Credit 3(2-2)
This course emphasizes basic copy editing. It includes extensive practical work in copy editing and headline writing for print and online media. Prerequisite: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 330. Public Relations Writing Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves instruction and practice in writing for news, governmental and legislative agencies; it covers press releases and all other writing styles required of public relations specialists. Prerequisites: JOMC 220 and JOMC 276. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 366. Leadership Problems and Media Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves the analysis of issues facing media executives and their employees. It emphasizes problems and
solutions that reflect the concerns of management in print, electronic media, and public relations. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F)

JOMC 368. Practical Writing Credit 1(1-1)
This course involves instruction and practice in communication skills for students of media management who will be involved in writing policies and procedures for media organizations. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (S)

JOMC 390. Public Relations Case Studies Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on case studies in public relations, emphasizing the success and failure of public relations practices. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, JOMC 276 and Junior Standing. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 403. Black Press in the United States Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines, within a chronological framework, the development of the African American press since the early 1800s. The focus is on significant personalities and issues during major movements in African American history. Prerequisites: JOMC 220 and 240. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 405. Introduction to Radio and Digital Audio Production Credit 3(2-2)
This course focuses on practical experience in digital audio techniques and conventional studio practices; projects in radio announcing; and digital audio production. Prerequisites: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 406. Introduction to Video Production Credit 3(1-4)
This course involves basic methods and techniques in video field and studio productions: announcing, program design, lighting, audio, camera, and electronic techniques are studied. Prerequisites: JOMC 220 and Mass Media Production Concentration. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 417. Advanced Video Production Credit 3(3-0)
Video production techniques are developed through the creation of individual video programs. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, 406, and 419. (DEMAND)

JOMC 418. Digital Audio Production Credit 3(3-0)
Advanced editing and production techniques and practices are developed utilizing digital production equipment. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, 405, and 508. (DEMAND)

JOMC 419. Nonlinear Video Editing Credit 3(1-4)
This course focuses on nonlinear editing and production techniques and practices.  A nonlinear video editing system is used to produce public service and commercial announcements, and other types of video programs. Prerequisite: JOMC 220 and 309. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 424. Design for Print and Online Media Credit 3(2-2)
This course emphasizes design and layout. It includes extensive principles of typography and design principles. Prerequisites: JOMC 220, 324. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 425. Electronic News Writing Credit 3(3-0)
This course introduces students to the principles of electronic journalism – including news gathering, reporting, writing, producing, and editing across media platforms. Prerequisite: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 430. Advanced Reporting and Writing (Formerly JOMC 530) Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves advanced training in newsgathering with an emphasis on business and investigative reporting and feature writing. Students will cover assigned beats and produce stories for publication on various media platforms. Prerequisites: JOMC 220, 231. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 435. Electronic Reporting and Producing Credit 3(2-2)
This course focuses on specialized beat reporting and on producing newscasts in multimedia platforms under deadline conditions. Prerequisites: JOMC 220, 309, 425. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 437. Field Production Credit 3(3-0)
Practical application of out-of-studio production techniques and theories for audio and video programs will be emphasized. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, 406, and 419. (DEMAND)

JOMC 440. Editorial Writing Credit 3(3-1)
This course is a study of interpretation and comment in writing editorials. It also provides practical experience in writing editorials for newspapers, magazines and online. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, and 324. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 441. Media Ethics Credit 3(3-0)
This course will provide students with a working knowledge of journalism ethics, the impact that ethical decision-making by journalists has on society, and the harm that unethical reporting by journalists can do to their careers and to the lives of others. Prerequisites: JOMC 220. (F;S)

JOMC 445. Script Writing Credit 3(3-0)
This course focuses on researching and writing treatments and scripts for radio, television, corporation or educational institutions, and online media. Prerequisites: JOMC 220, 406. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 470. Converged Media Projects Credit 3(0-6)
This lab course will allow students to apply the principles of writing and reporting in a cross-media environment. Students will develop two converged media projects and a class website. Following completion of this course, students will receive a certificate. Prerequisites: JOMC 220 and junior or senior standing. (DEMAND)

JOMC 475. Special Projects Credit 3(1-4)
Students produce a weekly television news magazine, documentary production, or newscast. Content may be distributed in a multimedia format. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, 309, 425 or 445, 435 or 507. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 486. Public Relations Campaigns Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves instruction in research, planning and evaluation for public relations practice in internal and external business environments including social media. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, 276, 324, 330, and 390. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 493. Communications Law and Ethics Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a survey of legal and extra-legal limitations on press freedom. The course includes a study of legal issues –including libel, free press, contempt of court, copyright, access law. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 496. Publication Design and Layout (Formerly JOMC 596) Credit 3(2-2)
Instruction in the principles of publication design and layout, with actual practice in laboratory publications. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, 324. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 499. Seminar: Case Studies in International Media Management Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves readings, discussions and analyses of case studies in international media management strategies in an effort to highlight the issues confronting managers in international media organizations. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (S)

JOMC 500. Public Relations Seminar Credit 3(3-0)
A course on a selected aspect of public relations as it relates to advertising and marketing research and other topics such as electronic communication. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (DEMAND)

JOMC 502. Current Issues in Mass Communication Credit 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the rights, responsibilities and changing characteristics of the mass media and the problems therein. It includes use of debates, mass communication practitioners and guest speakers. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

JOMC 507. Advanced Video Production Credit 3(2-2)
This course involves project-based, hands-on, advanced video productions for in-studio and field applications. It places emphasis on producing professional quality programs for various media platforms. Prerequisite: JOMC 220, 406, 419. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 508. Advanced Radio and Digital Audio Production Credit 3(2-2)
This course involves advanced production technology – including recording, editing and production techniques and concepts. Prerequisites: JOMC 220, 405, and 445. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 522. Media Management and Legal Issues Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an examination of the principles and policies of media management; it encompasses electronic and print media. Prerequisites: JOMC 220 and 406. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 540. Feature Writing Credit 3(3-0)
This course is an intensive practicum of feature writing involving background research for in-depth reports on various topics. Prerequisite: JOMC 220. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 550. Media and Politics (Formerly JOMC 600) Credit 3(3-0)
This course examines communication as a social behavior incorporating all facets of political science such as foreign policy, the courts, political movements and elections. Prerequisites: Senior standing; POLI 200; instructor’s permission. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 551. International Communication (Formerly JOMC 601) Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves readings, discussion and papers on the development of international communication and the role of communication in international relations. Prerequisites: POLI 200; instructor’s permission. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 552. Communication Theory (Formerly JOMC 602) Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves readings and discussions examining various communication theories. Students will prepare papers on these theories. Prerequisite: Senior standing; instructor’s permission. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 553. Mass Communication Seminar (Formerly JOMC 603) Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves research, discussions, and papers on communication topics. Prerequisite: Senior standing; instructor’s permission. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 554. Media Criticism (Formerly JOMC 604) Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves an explanation of the development of media and the theory and practice of media criticism. Prerequisite: Senior standing; instructor’s permission. (DEMAND)

JOMC 555. Organizational Communication (Formerly JOMC 605) Credit 3(3-0)
This course covers the theory and practice of communication to support organizational objectives, policies, and programs. Prerequisite: Senior standing; instructor’s permission. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 556. Business Reporting (Formerly JOMC 606) Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves instruction and practice in specific reporting techniques for business and industry. The coverage of trends and strategies will be explored. Prerequisite: Senior standing; instructor’s permission. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 557. Medical and Science Reporting (Formerly JOMC 607) Credit 3(3-0)
This course involves instruction and practice in specific reporting techniques for science and the medical industries. The coverage of trends and strategies will be explored. Prerequisite: Senior standing; instructor’s permission. (DEMAND)

JOMC 558. Law in Film and Literature Credit 3(3-0)
This course explores the correlations of legal issues and theories in film and literature through intense examination, analysis and discourse. Prerequisite: JOMC 493 or approval of professor and junior or senior standing. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 580. Independent Study in Journalism and Mass Communication (Formerly JOMC 680) Credit 3(3-0)
This course will cover an area of journalism and mass communication to be determined by the student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of chairperson and instructor, and Junior or Senior standing. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 591. Mass Communication Professional Development Seminar Credit 2(2-0)
This is an intensive study of professional practices, skills, etiquette and attitudes of the mass communication industry in preparation for an off-campus field learning experience. There are different prerequisites for different concentrations: Mass Media Production (JOMC 591.01) – Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 405, 406, 419, 445; 507* or 508*; Multimedia Journalism (JOMC 591.02) – Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 309, 324,425,430, 435*; Public Relations (JOMC 591.03) – Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 276, 324, 330, 390, 486*. This course is not normally offered in the summer. (*Must be enrolled in or must have completed these courses). (F;S;SS)

JOMC 592. Cable Television Seminar Credit 3(3-0)
This course includes a review of the development of cable television in the United States – including the law governing it, technical facilities necessary for an operation, and methods of financing various types of programming. The course will also focus on the advantages and disadvantages faced by minorities in cable programming. Prerequisites: JOMC 493 and 522. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 598. Mass Communication Internship Credit 3(1-4)
This class is an off-campus journalism and mass communication experience. Academic supervision is provided by faculty members and direction in the field is provided by an approved supervisor. This course must be taken the semester after passing JOMC 591 (Mass Communication Professional Development Seminar). Junior or senior standing. There are different prerequisites for different concentrations: Mass Media Production (JOMC 598.01) – Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 405, 406, 419, 445, 507 or 508, 591; Multimedia and Journalism (JOMC 598.02) – Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 309, 324, 425, 430, 435, 591; Public Relations (JOMC 598.03) – Grammar Proficiency Exam, JOMC 220, 276, 324, 330,  390, 324, 486, 591. (F;S;SS)

JOMC 608. Women and Media Credit 3(3-0)
This course is designed to acquaint students with the major critical approaches to understanding the role of women as auteurs in film as well as editors, writers and producers in all facets of mass communication. The course also addresses gender in cinema with an examination of global diversity issues as they are explored through the readings of major film critics from national and transnational backgrounds. Readings and exercises of leading digital media scholars will also be explored. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. (F;S;SS) 

DIRECTORY OF FACULTY

Charles Atkinson
Lecturer
B.S., Appalachian State University

Linda Callahan
Professor
B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University

Bruce Clark
Lecturer
B.A., Clark College, M.A., New York University

Vanessa Cunningham-Engram
Associate Professor
B.A., M.A., University of Louisville; J.D., Louis D. Brandeis School of Law; Ed.D., Spalding University

Bonnie Newman Davis
Greensboro News-Record- Janice Bryant Howroyd Endowed Professor
B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., The University of Michigan

Dawn Nail Davis
Lecturer
B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Austin Peay State University

Dwight Davis
Lecturer
B.A., B.S., High Point University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Emily Harris
Student Newspaper Advisor and Lecturer
B.A., M.A., Marshall University

Sandra Hughes
Lecturer
B.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Allen Johnson
Lecturer
B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jacqueline Jones
Lecturer
B.A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Ball State University

Tamrat Mereba
Professor
B.S., University of Idaho, M.S., University of Wisconsin at LaCrosse, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison

Bonita Perry
Lecturer
B.A., Winston Salem State University, M.F.A., Savannah College of Art and Design

Kim Smith
Instructor
B.A., Howard University; M.M.C., Ph.D., University of South Carolina

Teresa Jo Styles
Professor
B.A., Spelman College; M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., University North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Anthony Welborne
Assistant Professor and General Manager, WNAA-FM
B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Sheila Whitley
Associate Professor
A.A., Wingate University; B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Gail Wiggins
Assistant Professor and Interim Chairperson
B.A., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University

Points of Pride