Undergraduate Program

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED

Mathematics (Applied Mathematics) – Bachelor of Science
Mathematics (Pure Mathematics) – Bachelor of Science
Mathematics (Statistics) – Bachelor of Science
Secondary Education (Mathematics Education) – Bachelor of Science

 GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Admission, retention and graduation requirements for students enrolled in degree programs in the Department of Mathematics are based upon the general admission, retention and graduation requirements of the University. However, two units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry and one-half unit of trigonometry are required of all students who elect to pursue any curriculum offered in the department.

 SPECIFIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Mathematics (Applied Mathematics): The Applied Mathematics major must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours of University courses, including 44 hours in mathematics, 8 hours in physics, 5 hours in computer programming and 18 hours of applications area electives.

 Mathematics (Pure Mathematics): The Pure Mathematics major must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours of University courses. These include 53 hours in mathematics, 5 hours in computer programming and 16 hours in sciences.

 Mathematics (Statistics): The Statistics major must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours of University courses. These include 44 hours in mathematics, 15 hours in statistics, 8 hours in physics and 5 hours in computer programming.

 Secondary Education (Mathematics education): The Secondary Mathematics Education major must complete a minimum of 125 semester hours of University courses. These include 43 hours in mathematics, 8 hours in sciences and 27 hours in education. Also, majors must earn a “C” or better grade in each required mathematics course taken to fulfill the mathematics requirement. All Teacher Education admissions, retention and graduate standards apply.

MINOR IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS

The minor in applied mathematics consists of satisfaction of a prerequisite and successful completion with a grade of “C” or better in at least 19 credit hours of course work, specified as follows:

  1. Prerequisite to the Applied Mathematics minor: Students must complete one of the calculus courses, MATH 112 or MATH 131, with a grade of “C” or better.
  2. Required Course (4 credit hours): Students in the applied mathematics minor program are required to complete MATH 132 with a grade of  “C” or better
  3. Mathematics Electives (9-15 credit hours): Students in the applied mathematics minor program need to take three to five additional mathematics courses from the following list: MATH 223, MATH 231, MATH 224, MATH 240, MATH 311, MATH 431, MATH 432, MATH 440, MATH 450, MATH 480, MATH 507, MATH 511, MATH 608, MATH 612, MATH 623, MATH 650, MATH 651, MATH 690, MATH 692
  4. Application Electives (up to 6 credit hours): Students in the applied mathematics minor program may take up to two courses at 200 level or above from an application area in  biology, chemistry, physics, business and economics, computer science, or an engineering or technology discipline.

MINOR IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

All minor applications must be approved by the Department of Mathematics.

The minor in Mathematics Education consists of satisfaction of prerequisites and successful completion with a grade of “C” or better in at least 26 credit hours of course work to help qualify the minor candidate in mathematics education for a secondary school teaching license. The prerequisite and 25-26 credit hours of course work are specified as follows:

  1. Prerequisites to the Mathematics Education Minor:  a) Students must complete MATH 110 or MATH 111 and MATH 112 or MATH 131 and MATH 224, with a grade of “C” or better, b) Students must be formally admitted to the Teacher Education Program. This process includes: 1) A completed application approved by the Department of Mathematics, 2) A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.80 (on a 4.00 scale), 3) Passing scores on Praxis I, and 4) An interview by the Teacher Education Panel.
  2. Required courses (19 credit hours): Students in the mathematics education minor program are required to complete the following MATH and CUIN courses: MATH 132, MATH 205, MATH 206, CUIN, CUIN 520, CUIN 640, CUIN 660.
  3. Mathematics electives (6-7 credit hours): Students in the mathematics education minor program need to take at least two additional mathematics courses from the following list: MATH 231, MATH 242, MATH 430, or MATH 450.

All minor applications must be approved by the Department of Mathematics.

 WHY CHOOSE MATH AS A MAJOR?

Mathematics is one of the most demanding undergraduate majors. This is one reason why mathematics graduates are readily employable in a wide range of areas. Prospective employers understand and appreciate that, apart from their analytical thinking and problem-solving skills, math majors have demonstrated their ability to work hard while mastering a difficult subject.

 Did you do well in your high school math and science courses? Do you enjoy a challenge, games, and puzzles? Are you a curious person who likes to understand how things work? If your answers are "yes", then you should consider majoring in mathematics.

 Graduates with bachelor’s degrees in mathematics are hired by many types of firms, high tech and communications among them, although the job description might not explicitly mention mathematics. Firms actively recruiting mathematicians include engineering and computer companies, banking, science and financial consulting firms, as well as biomedical and imaging enterprises. Whether you decide to pursue the pure or applied mathematics major, or the statistics major, or the mathematics secondary education major, the mathematics curriculum will give you enough flexibility to take courses in other disciplines which complement and enrich your education in the way most suited to you.

 The trend of seeing mathematics as a natural counterpart to a liberal arts concentration is also reflected in the job market. The interest in quantitative methods is expanding into new areas such as medicine, psychology, cinema and advertising. Today it is more and more common to find math majors in hospital settings, financial establishments, marketing, and as main characters in movies and plays.

Pure Mathematics

The pure mathematics concentration is designed for students who value the study of mathematics, not only for application, but also for its own sake, and are interested in finding new formulae and methods while utilizing insights from a tradition of thousands of years.  The pure mathematics concentration is recommended for those interested in graduate study in pure mathematics, and those who seek a rigorous education that involves not only rote computational skills but also rigorous explanations of how mathematics works. 

 Applied Mathematics

The applied mathematics concentration is designed to provide students with training in the applications of mathematics in engineering, sciences, medicine, health care, business and finance. Applied mathematics concentration is recommended for those interested in the mathematical study of general scientific concepts, principles, and phenomena that, because of their widespread occurrence and application, relate or unify various disciplines. The use of computational methods and implementation of algorithms on computers is central in the study of applied mathematics.

 Statistics

The statistics concentration is designed to provide students with statistical tools and conceptual foundations in quantitative reasoning to extract information intelligently from data. The statistics concentration is recommended for those interested in collecting, analyzing and interpreting data statistically, as well as effectively communicating and presenting the results relying on data. Statistics is becoming more important in modern society in providing succinct information for making decisions, and is used in a wide variety of fields including science, technology, business, health, and social sciences.

 Mathematics Secondary Education

The mathematics secondary education concentration is designed to prepare students for careers as mathematics teachers from tenth through twelfth grade by providing both a strong foundation in mathematical content and pedagogical experience in the classroom. The secondary education in mathematics is recommended for those interested in content knowledge, problem solving, curriculum development, lesson and unit planning, the use of technology, and the evaluation of student knowledge. The program is designed so that students can easily double major in mathematics, giving its graduates added flexibility and expertise in mathematics.

 MATHEMATICS CAREERS

Mathematical research and education are at the heart of some careers, while other careers utilize mathematics and its applications to build and enhance important work in the sciences, business, finance, manufacturing, communications, and engineering.

 According to the Wall Street Journal: Mathematician is considered the Best Job of All Jobs.  Mathematician’s median annual income was pegged at $94,160.

5 of the 6 “Best Jobs” in terms of low stress, high compensation, autonomy, and hiring demand in the “Job Related Almanac” by Les Krantz are all math related.

“The top 15 highest-earning college degrees all have one thing in common — math skills. That’s according to a recent survey from the National Association of Colleges and Employers, which tracks college graduates’ job offers.”