Institutional Report Addendum

Standard 6 Responses to Validation Questions

Question 1. What professional development opportunities are provided to full-time faculty? Are the workshops open to part-time faculty?

The Unit continually provides professional development opportunities for its full- and part-time faculty related to quality academic advising practices (Exhibit 6.1 Advancement Session with Registrar), K-12 and community engagement (Exhibit 6.2 Advancement Sessions with GCS administrators), reappointment and tenure policies (Exhibit 6.3 Junior Faculty RPT Workshops), and accreditation development (Exhibit 6.4 NC A&T CAEP Conference). The unit also engaged faculty and candidates in professional development that improves their instructional ability and examines current scholarship on best practices (Exhibit 3.2 Agenda of Signature Programs).

Professional development workshops are offered at the institutional level through the Center for Leadership and Organizational Excellence (CLOE) (Exhibit 5.3 CLOE Professional Development) and the Instructional Technology Services and Distance Education (ITSDE) (Exhibit 5.4 ITSDE Professional Development). Blackboard workshops are developed by Instructional Technology Services and Distance Education (ITSDE) based on campus needs. In addition, ITSDE staff provide training on an individual basis, and faculty are encouraged to meet with ITSDE staff to have specific questions addressed, or to receive support in instructional design specific to their curriculum. ITSDE also offers specific training sessions on modules that faculty can use within BlackBoard to improve the ways they engage instructionally or to assist with the ways they assess student learning products.

Question 2. Are handbooks and other school/unit resource materials revised each year?

Various committees associated with the School of Education, Teacher Education Council, and the Office of Student Support Services engage in annual reviews of handbooks and guidelines. The unit’s assessment system does not necessitate annual revisions of handbooks and other unit resources; however, these decisions are driven by data that the unit collects, analyzes, and interprets. If these analyses dictate revisions to handbooks and resource materials, then the unit moves these decisions through the Teacher Education Council or School of Education approval process if applicable to enact these changes.

Question 3. What evidence is available that the staffing for technology support is adequate for the on-campus and off-campus programs and teacher education candidates? 

The unit does not offer off-campus programs that lead to a professional education license. The university provides information technology resources to support faculty and candidates. There are staff persons assigned to each of the 60 computer labs throughout the university (Exhibit 6.5 NC A&T Computer Labs). The unit employs two full-time individuals and two graduate assistants to support faculty, staff, and students with technological integration and technological repair. One position is a technology support person (Exhibit 6.6 Technology Support Technician Job Description) whose primary responsibility is to work closely with the university’s Division of Information Technology area to provide faculty, staff, and students with technology assistance, which may include computer hardware repair, computer software updates, computer networking issues, classroom technology repair and updates, SmartBoard assistance, and hardware provisions during workshops, events, or conferences. The other position is a University Program Specialist (Exhibit 6.7 University Program Specialist Job Description) whose primary responsibility is to work closely with faculty, staff, and candidates with the integration of various software packages and technological devices into their instructional design and implementation.

Question 4. What have been the faculty loads in the unit over the last three years?

Faculty workload policies and procedures are clearly outlined in the NC A&T Faculty Handbook. Undergraduate faculty members are expected to teach up to 12 credit hours, and graduate faculty are expected to teach no more than nine credit hours per semester. Department chairs have flexibility to provide alternative assignments based upon needs within the unit or individual faculty goals (Exhibit 6.8 Faculty Instructional Workload). 

Question 5. What is the role of cooperating teachers and other school personnel in designing the school program and experiences of student teachers?

Cooperating teachers have the opportunity to participate in the design of our school program and the experiences of student teachers through focus group sessions (Exhibit 6.9 Focus Group Responses from Student Teachers and Interns). Public school partners serve on the Teacher Education Council Field-Based and Clinical Experiences committee (Exhibit 6.10 TEC Field Based and Clinical Experience Committee Meeting Minutes). Also data from cooperating teacher evaluation forms are aggregated and used to assess the quality of the student teaching experience. School principals and cooperating teachers are also asked to give feedback via an employer survey. The Master of School Administration program engages other school personnel as members of their advisory boards (Exhibit 6.11 MSA Advisory Board Members). 

Question 6. Part-time faculty’s knowledge of unit-wide documents such as the CF. What formal and informal activities engage part-time faculty and advisory groups in the unit’s work?

The unit employs approximately 27 part-time faculty each year. Part-time faculty are encouraged and expected to attend program, department, and school meetings. These meetings provide an overview of the conceptual framework, institutional effectiveness, student advisement and other pertinent matters (Exhibit 6.12 CUIN End-of-Year Reflection Session Minutes). The Department of Curriculum and Instruction provides a handbook specifically for part-time faculty (Exhibit 6.13 CUIN Clinical Faculty and Adjunct Handbook). The Master of School Administration program engages part-time faculty as instructors and as members of its program’s advisory board (Exhibit 6.11 MSA Advisory Board Members). 

Question 7. Technician and media specialist. Is this one position adequate to support faculty, staff, and students in the unit?

The unit employs three individuals to support faculty, staff, and students in the unit with technological integration and technological repair. One person is a technology specialist whose primary responsibility is to coordinate and provide leadership for all aspects of instructional technology within the unit (Exhibit 6.14 Technology Assistant Job Description). The second person is a Technology Support Technician (Exhibit 6.6 Technology Support Technician Job Description) whose primary responsibility is to work closely with the university’s DoIT area to provide faculty, staff, and students with technology assistance, which may include computer hardware repair, computer software updates, computer networking issues, classroom technology repair and updates, SmartBoard assistance, and hardware provisions during workshops, events, or conferences. This person receives training from the university’s DoIT area to ensure his professional knowledge, technological skills, and technological policy compliance awareness are at a proficient level. The third person is a University Program Specialist (Exhibit 6.7 University Program Specialist Job Description) whose primary responsibility is to work closely with the university’s ISTE area to provide the unit’s faculty, staff, and students with technology integration in the classroom. These services may include maximizing use of BlackBoard in one’s instructional presentation, integrating elements of Taskstream into the course design, utilizing software like Respondus or Collaborate into instructional implementation, or orienting people to new technological or software innovations.  

Question 8. What is the amount of faculty development funds available per faculty member? What is the typical amount of an award? What percentage of faculty and staff participated in faculty development activities in each of the last three years? 

Faculty have access to professional development funds from multiple sources, including their departmental funds, the Dean’s Office (when applicable), and Title III via the Academy for Teaching and Learning (ATL). Faculty must submit ATL travel requests that do not exceed $2100 per academic year. There is no set amount available to the unit.  During 2013-2014, 100% of valid requests were funded. Funding support provided over the past three years evidence how the amount varies per year. The unit provided $50,453 in 2011-12, $89,950 in 2012-13, and $59,080 in 2013-14 to support faculty travel and registration fees, totaling $199,483.00 over the three year period. The unit expended $80,655.00 to assist faculty in research and grant writing activities. This amount includes funding support of $15,723 for graduate research assistants and $64,932 for undergraduate hourly and non-hourly wages. Additionally, the School of Education provides a portion of the monies received from indirect costs to support faculty engagement in professional development activities. One hundred percent of faculty participated in some form of professional development over the last three years.

During the 2013-2014 academic year, the School of Education’s Title III budget supported faculty development activities totaling $14,111.00. The Academy for Teaching and Learning (ATL) supported faculty attendance and participation at professional meetings and international travel endeavors. Faculty development activities supported through ATL total $64,606.00 within the last three academic years (2011/12 - $32,330; 2012/13 - $14,003; and 2013/14 - $18,273).  Additionally, the university offers a host of on-campus professional development opportunities that are low cost or no cost to faculty. ATL sponsors workshops and seminars to enhance learning in the classroom by strengthening faculty pedagogical skills.  The Office of Instructional Technology Services and Distance Education (ITSDE) provides professional development for faculty to model best practices through the incorporation of classroom technology. ITSDE conducts workshops, seminars, and one-on-one instruction for faculty to develop online teaching modules through the utilization of Blackboard.

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