Institutional Report Addendum

Standard 4 Responses to Validation Questions

Question 1. How are candidates prepared to communicate with students and families in ways that demonstrate cultural sensitivity and how are candidates’ proficiencies documented?

Candidates are prepared to communicate with students and families in ways that demonstrate cultural sensitivity throughout their professional education program. 

Initial Programs

In CUIN 210 Culturally Relevant Pedagogy (Exhibit 4.1 CUIN 210 Syllabus), candidates learn to take into consideration the various cultural aspects of the classroom such as race, ethnicity, gender, and P-12 student academic performance (Exhibit 4.2 Classroom Layout and Cultural Resources Directory) as they plan and implement instruction. In CUIN 410 Differentiated Instruction, faculty use Electronic Evidence 3 Thematic Unit Plan to assess candidates’ abilities to differentiate instruction along diversity variables such as race, gender, and exceptionalities (Exhibit 4.3 Electronic Evidence 3 Content Area Instructional Unit Plan Candidate Work Sample).  The unit also assesses candidates’ cultural sensitivity to diverse students and families throughout the field and student teaching experience. Faculty assess candidate performance throughout their early field experiences using the Field Experience Interns’ Performance Evaluation form. Standard II of this observation instrument assesses the intern’s ability to establish a respectful environment for a diverse population of students (Exhibit 4.4 Intern Performance Evaluation). Candidates also have opportunities to work with diverse students and families via various signature programs and events such as the Hampton Literacy Family Night at the unit’s partnership elementary school, the Hampton Elementary Partnership School (Exhibit 4.5 Hampton Family Literacy Project) or via projects like the “Help the Homeless” (Exhibit 4.6 SPED 354 Homeless Children in Our Schools). 

Advanced Programs

Candidates in advanced programs are prepared to communicate with diverse students and families. Candidates in MAT programs take into consideration information about the P-12 learner as they plan instruction (Exhibit 4.3 Electronic Evidence 3 Content Area Instructional Unit Plan Candidate Work Sample).  The unit also assesses candidates’ abilities to implement instruction with culturally and linguistically diverse students (Exhibit 1.30 Electronic Evidence 5 Differentiated Instruction Teacher Work Sample). Faculty assess candidate performance throughout their early field experiences using the Field Experience Interns’ Performance Evaluation form. Standard II of this observation instrument assesses the intern’s ability to establish a respectful environment for a diverse population of students (Exhibit 4.4 Intern Performance Evaluation).

Candidates in Master of Science, Master of Arts in Education (MAEd), and Master of School Administration (MSA) programs demonstrate their cultural sensitivity to diverse students and families through various programmatic key assessments. MSA candidates produce a Crisis Management Plan to illustrate their abilities to plan for school culture and safety (Exhibit 4.7 Culturally Responsive Crisis Management Plan). Candidates in the MAEd Elementary Education and MAEd Reading programs construct a Documented Accomplishments evidence to demonstrate their engagement with culturally diverse students and families (Exhibit 4.8 MAED READ Documented Accomplishments). Candidates in the MS Agricultural Education program produce an Diversity Management Plan (Exhibit 1.16 AGED Diversity Management Plan) to demonstrate their abilities to work with diverse students and families, and candidates in the MS Instructional Technology program construct a Leadership Project (Exhibit 4.9 MS Instructional Technology Leadership Project) to illustrate their engagement with families and students.

Question 2. When and how do candidates incorporate multiple perspectives in the subject matter being taught?

The professional education core is designed and sequenced to teach candidates how to incorporate multiple perspectives into the curriculum and field and clinical experiences.

Initial Program

Candidates in CUIN 210 Culturally Relevant Pedagogy incorporates cultural mini assignments and a final culturally relevant instructional plan where candidates must identify diversity areas to include media perceptions of learners. In CUIN 410 Differentiated Instruction, candidates initiate a Differentiated Instruction Teacher Work Sample and complete it during the student teaching experience. This evidence requires candidates to respond to the academic, disability, and cultural differences of P-12 students in their classrooms. Linked to these courses are early field experiences where candidates engage in experiential activities. This process culminates with student teaching where candidates must demonstrate their ability to use a variety of instructional methods and design a safe, nurturing environment for all students (Exhibit 4.10 BS Programs Heat Map).

Advanced Program

The MAT programs adhere to a similar progression where candidates are introduced to learning theories and teaching the whole child in CUIN 618 Learning Theories. In CUIN 715 Assessing and Evaluating 21st Century Learning and CUIN 729 Diversity Issues in K-12 Classrooms, candidates explore how and why classroom teachers must engage P-12 students through multiple perspectives. Candidates illustrate mastery of this ability in their clinical practice where university supervisors and P-12 cooperating teachers assess and evaluate via an observational protocol.

Candidates enrolled in CUIN 729 Diversity Issues in K-12 Classrooms produce a critical cultural autobiography where they explore their personal biases and subjectivities. Candidates conduct a school-based equity audit where they assess and evaluate school-based resources to determine if the environment is responsive to their students’ cultural and linguistic differences. They also construct an educational or social justice grant proposal where they must analyze School Improvement Plan data relative to diversity to propose a responsive program that improves the learning needs of all students (Exhibit 4.11 CUIN 729 Diversity Issues in K-12 Classrooms Syllabus).

Candidates enrolled in MSA 772 Educational Administration and Management produce a Culturally Responsive Crisis Management Plan (Evidence 3) where they develop a hand guide that includes an explanation of any “hidden curriculum” (e.g., school climate, informal behaviors, school-specific curriculum), gang knowledge, violent crime data, misconceptions and misguided assumptions about students and the community (Exhibit 4.12 MSA 772 Syllabus).

READ 757 Assessment and Literacy Instruction integrates case study, observation, and discussion board as modes of delivery with assignments that address gender differences in reading, internal and external variables that influence reading. Literacy strategy that takes into account students who read below, on, and above grade level (Exhibit 4.13 READ 757 Syllabus).

Question 3. How are candidates prepared to develop a classroom and school climate that values diversity? How is this data collected and where are these proficiencies documented?

Candidates are prepared to develop a classroom and school climate that values diversity by utilizing curricula grounded in a developmental growth model. Early in curricula, candidates examine and engage in discourse related to ethics of teaching where they explore what it means to teach the “whole” child. Using this information, candidates matriculate through courses where they learn the importance of learning more about their learners within their school and outside the school as well as learning more about their learners’ families and communities. These proficiencies are documented in key assessments throughout the program like Electronic Evidence #3 Content Area Instructional Unit Plan Work Sample and Electronic Evidence #5 Differentiated Instruction Teacher Work Sample (Exhibit 1.28 Electronic Evidence 3 Content Area Instructional Unit Work Sample, Exhibit 1.29 Electronic Evidence 5 Differentiated Instruction Teacher Work Sample). In candidate early field experiences and clinical practice placements, university supervisors and P-12 classroom teachers observe and rate candidates’ abilities (Exhibit 1.3 Early Field Experience Evaluation) to develop a classroom and school climate that values all learners and respects candidate diversity. Candidates also develop classroom management plans where they articulate their philosophy of teaching diverse students then structure and design a classroom layout conductive for all students to learn. Candidates write a justification that articulates how their classroom layout aligns with their philosophical beliefs grounded in theories of learning and explain how this structure would maximize student learning (Exhibit 4.2 Classroom Layout and Cultural Resources Directory). The unit’s model classroom reflects religious, gender, ethnic, racial, and disability diversity in its resources (Exhibit 3.1 Model Classroom). 

Question 4. Evidence of specific plans to improve faculty diversity. What specific plans of strategic recruitment are in place to improve faculty diversity?

All employment-related efforts within the unit aligns with the University’s Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action policies (Exhibit 4.14 Human Resources Policies on EEO/AA). The University’s Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Officer utilizes PeopleAdmin 7 to review candidates selected to interview within the unit and across the university to ensure the university's diversity initiatives are met.  The university uses a workforce analysis that identifies any underrepresentation of minorities and females then sets goals and objectives to enhance employment and advancement opportunities for females and minorities.  

In 2014, the Provost wrote a grant that included a section on improving diversity among faculty.  That grant was funded and those initiatives will go into effect in late spring 2015.  They include broadening the advertisement scope to include Latino, international, women, and other multicultural media.

Specific plans include 1) ensuring the university climate welcomes diversity, 2) teach faculty about procedures and customs of the university, 3) provide opportunities for chairs, directors, and other administrators to learn about strategies for recruiting and retaining diversity faculty, 4) address diversity concerns among current faculty, and 5) broaden advertisement and include Latino, international, and women sites.

Question 5. How are the study abroad program and domestic exchange program making positive impact on candidates and provide opportunities for candidates to interact with diverse peers? 

The unit provides opportunities for all initial and advanced candidates to participate in study abroad and domestic exchange programs that expose them to diverse P-12 students, pre-service teacher education candidates, in-service teachers, and families. Candidates have had opportunities to participate in several study abroad opportunities such as the ongoing five-week summer Jamaican experience (where they assist elementary- and middle-school aged students in Jamaica with literacy and mathematic skill development) or the five-day summer England-London/Paris experience (where candidates explore and examine school-based differences between American public schools and schools within these countries). Candidates have also had opportunities to participate in the Malawi summer experience (where they engage youth in Africa to impact their learning outcomes) (Exhibit 4.15 Study Abroad Experiences). 

Candidates unable to participate in these study abroad experiences have also had opportunities to participate in domestic exchanges such as the Rural-Urban Exchange with Western Carolina or the Muskingum University experience with pre-service teacher education candidates from Ohio (Exhibit 4.16 Domestic Exchange Experiences). With these experiences, candidates at North Carolina A&T have the opportunity to interact with other pre-service teacher education candidates at other institutions that are vastly different in terms of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. 

Regardless of the opportunities provided, candidates reflect on these experiences to articulate how meaningful and significant they are with respect to how the exchange impacted their learning, beliefs, perceptions, and attitudes (Exhibit 4.17 Student Reflections on Exchange Programs). A candidate reported that as a result of studying another culture, she now questions her own. This student goes not to note it is now her time to make an impact. She went on to set a goal for herself noting, “When I am settled into the classroom I will share my knowledge with students in hopes of them wanting to seek their own understanding of the world.” Another candidate reported the Muskingum trip not only opened his eyes as an educator but also as a person. Specifically, he cited observing and interacting with teachers and students at various schools. He left with knowing that as an educator one cannot make assumptions about students’ prior knowledge and experiences.  

The unit also provides opportunities for those candidates who traveled abroad or who participated in domestic exchange programs to share their experiences and to reflect orally with other candidates at the university, at professional conferences, and through publication opportunities (Exhibit 4.18 Professional Conference Presentations and Publications).

Question 6. What activities do candidates participate that provide these opportunities to interact with diverse peers?

The unit provides a host of opportunities for initial and advanced candidates to interact with diverse peers not only at the university but also external to the institution. The unit has sponsored and implemented a host of signature programs and meetings open for initial and advanced candidates to attend such as the Urban Education Institute, the On Common Ground Conference, the Rehabilitation of Ethnic Minorities with Behavioral Addictions (REMBA) Conference, the Graduate Students’ Reading Symposium, and the Human Performance and Leisure Studies Annual Symposium (Exhibit 3.2 Agenda of Signature Programs). Candidates also may participate in numerous student organizations like the Student North Carolina Association of Educators, DreamKeepers Living and Learning Community, Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society, or the Emergent Educational Leaders’ Seminar Series. These organizations provide opportunities for initial and advanced candidates to develop their professional identities as candidates learn to organize diverse people, facilitate meetings, plan agenda, and plan engagement activities in P-12 schools and the community. 

The unit also supports initial and advanced candidate attendance in events and activities external to the institution such as the Triad Teaching Fellows Conference or participation in professional organization meetings like the North Carolina Social Studies Conference, North Carolina Teachers of Mathematics, the Council for Exceptional Children, and the North Carolina Teacher Education Forum (Exhibit 4.19 Faculty Attendance at Professional Meetings and Conferences). Candidates also have opportunities to participate in study abroad and domestic exchange experiences. The Rural Urban Exchange with Western Carolina University allows for interaction with peers in seminars and classes on each other’s campus. Candidates also participate in an exchange with peers at Muskingum University, a private liberal arts institution in northern Ohio (Exhibit 4.15 Study Abroad ExperiencesExhibit 4.16 Domestic Exchange Experiences).

Question 7. Candidate participation and proficiency data on the afterschool program in CUIN 210 (ELL). How many students are participating in these activities? Are all candidates required to participate? Are there data to demonstrate that this program is making a difference?

Candidates enrolled in the CUIN 210 Culturally Relevant Pedagogy course are assigned to the Elimu Learning Center for their 30-hour early field experience (Exhibit 4.1 CUIN 210 Syllabus). Because this experience is an afterschool program, not all candidates are able to participate in this placement due to class or work schedule conflicts. Those candidates who are unable to participate in the Elimu Learning Center are assigned to P-12 schools where they complete the same field-based activities in their assigned environment that the candidates at the Elimu Learning Center complete. These activities are designed to explore P-12 student diversity regardless of context or placement so the same proficiencies are documented irrespective of the field experience assignment. Data from the Director of the Elimu Learning Center indicate there have been positive impacts on student learning (Exhibit 4.20 Elimu Learning Center Impact on Student Learning).

Question 8. Are there specific multiple data points that document that candidates believe that all students can learn?

The unit’s assessment system is designed to collect data at each transition point on initial and advanced candidates’ beliefs about all students having access to a quality education. 

Initial Program Data Points

  1. Admissions: Candidates articulate their beliefs about P-12 student learning via the teacher education interview and the philosophy of education
  2. Disposition survey: Candidates provide responses that illustrate their beliefs and attitudes related to all students learning
  3. Early field experience: Faculty utilize P-12 cooperating teacher and university supervisor observation ratings of candidates in their early field experiences and student teaching experience.
  4. Diversity class: Candidates enroll in CUIN 210 Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and CUIN 410 Differentiated Instruction where they learn to engage all learners.
  5. Employer survey: Specific items address candidates’ beliefs that all students can learn.

Advanced Program Data Points

  1. Admission: Candidates engage in a teacher education interview where they articulate their beliefs about P-12 student learning.
  2. Early field experience: Faculty utilize P-12 cooperating teacher and university supervisor observation ratings of candidates in their early field experiences and student teaching experience.
  3. Philosophy of Education: Candidates write a Philosophy of Education as part of their Electronic Evidence 3 and update it in their Electronic Evidence 5.
  4. Diversity course: Candidates enroll in CUIN 729 Diversity Issues in K-12 Classrooms where they learn to engage all learners.
  5. Employer survey: Specific items address candidates’ beliefs that all students can learn.
Back to Top