Research Interviews

Family and consumer sciences researchers combine service with science to address childhood obesity in a rural North Carolina church community.

High cholesterol and cardiovascular disease claimed the life of Paulette Garrett’s father at age 49. Now, the Enfield, N.C., mother wants to make sure her 9-year-old daughter avoids a similar fate. That is why, she says, she gladly enrolled in an N.C. A&T community-based participatory research project.

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 Support from land-grant research and Cooperative Extension helps the Tar Heel State’s fastest-growing livestock industry.

Although meat goat production in North Carolina is small in comparison to swine and cattle production, it now represents the fastest-growing livestock industry in the state, and North Carolina is the eighth-largest goat producer in the nation.

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An N.C. A&T biological engineer is designing sustainable biorefineries for producing biofuels, chemicals, plastics, and other products from an array of biomass feedstocks.

Where the petroleum industry stood 150 years ago, with just a smattering of hand-dug wells yielding a little tar for adhesives or kerosene for lamps, is where visionaries of green technologies see the biomass-to-biofuels industry today. Industry researchers are working to transform this sleeping giant into a viable alternative to the black gold that fueled the industrial and technological revolutions.

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Undergrad experiments with essential oils that may combat salmonella and other foodborne pathogens.

Don’t tell Kaya Feaster that academia has no relevance to the real world. Since experiencing a painful inflammatory ailment, her participation in the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program suddenly became very personal. 
            “I realized medications had their limitations. I said, ‘There has to be a better way.’”

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Undergraduate researcher explores issues in soil science.

It’s 8 o’clock sharp on a cold Monday morning in January, and Jason Shelton is already in the lab and hard at work. He carefully lines up rows of numbered and labeled bottles – 57 in all – each one containing about a half teaspoon of soil, and awaiting an infusion of acid that will remove the carbohydrates so he can measure and study them further. 

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Research scholar develops career focus while examining the economics of organic produce grown in NC.

Although she’s barely out of her teens, Jazmine Bowser already has a pretty good idea of the kind of life she wants to make for herself. She sees herself working in a corporate environment, maybe as a financial advisor, maybe as a lawyer.  She’d like to be well-off. She “definitely” has to live in a fast-paced city, she says with conviction. And that’s why she majored in agricultural economics at N.C. Agricultural and Technical State University.

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Enzymes coupled with high-fiber feed could improve animal health.

Adrienne Goode, an animal sciences major and undergraduate research scholar in A&T’s Agricultural Research Program, carefully measures a powdery brown substance into a vial, places it in a caddy with similar vials, and lowers the assembly into a mechanical feed digester. 

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Points of Pride