College of Engineering to Host Chief Scientist

The College of Engineering will host Dr. Douglass Post, Chief Scientist of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) and an IPA from the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute.

The speaker series will be held on Tuesday, April 8, at 11:00 a.m. in McNair Auditorium. In his discussion on Innovating with Computational Science and Engineering, Post will speak about the high performance computing power now becoming available (1015-1018 FLOPs) that will give society the unprecedented capability to harness this power to address and solve many technical problems facing the world today. The Dean’s Distinguished Speaker Series is free and open to the public. 


About Dr. Douglass Post

Post is the Chief Scientist of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) and an IPA from the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute. He established and leads the DoD Computational Research and Engineering Acquisition Tools and Environments (CREATE) Program.

Post received his Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University in 1975.  He is the associate editor-in-chief of the AIP/IEEE Publication “Computing in Science and Engineering.” Post established and led the Tokamak Modeling Group at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory. He also led the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Physics Team for which he received the American Nuclear Society (ANS) Outstanding Technical Achievement Award for fusion science and engineering in 1992.  He led the A Division Nuclear Weapons Simulation programs at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory nuclear weapons code development programs. Post is a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society, the American Physical Society, and the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE).  He received the American Society of Naval Engineers 2011 Gold Medal Award in February 2012, for the CREATE Program and has written more than 250 publications with over 6,500 citations.