Courses

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UNDERGRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN PHYSICS

PHYS 100. Physics   Orientation

Credit 1(1-0)

The course introduces   students to the various branches of physics.  The applications of   physics in science and engineering technology as well as current advances in   physics will be discussed.  The role of physics in interdisciplinary   programs and research is discussed.  Other topics may include the role   of race, gender, religion, politics, economics, and history in physics. (F)

 

PHYS 101. Introduction to   Astronomy

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is a broad survey   of astronomy that examines the night sky, the seasons, the phases of the   moon, eclipses, gravity, light, telescopes, the solar system, stars, and   galaxies. (F;S)

 

PHYS 104.    Introduction to Cosmology

Credit 3(3-0)

This course will examine the   universe:  its size, shape and expansion; its origin, age and future;   black holes and the mysterious dark matter and dark energy. (F; S)

 

PHYS 105. Physics for   Nonscientists

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is intended for   non-science students. It is a qualitative introduction to topics at the   forefront of modern physics, with an emphasis on conceptual understanding.   Mathematics use is reduced to a minimum. The course stresses the major role   physics plays in our everyday life and aims at helping students evaluate the   importance of the new scientific developments and their technological and   socio-economical implications. It covers a wide variety of topics such as the   building blocks of matter, the evolution of our universe, superconductivity   and superfluidity, MRI and medical imaging techniques, the physics of lasers,   the physics of semiconductors and transistors, nanoscience and   nanotechnology, modern and future energy sources and their effects on the   environment. (F;S)

 

PHYS 110. Survey of   Physics

Credit 2(2-0)

This is a one-semester study   of selected topics in physics from each of the following: Newtonian   mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, atomic, and nuclear   physics, and relativity. Prerequisites: MATH 102, 110 or 111. Corequisite:   PHYS 111. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 111. Survey of   Physics Lab

Credit 1(0-2)

This is a laboratory course   to be taken concurrently with PHYS 110, Survey of Physics. Students will   perform experiments designed to verify and/or clarify physics concepts.   Corequisite: PHYS 110. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 211. Technical   Physics I

Credit 3(4-0)

This is a study of the basic   principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, wave motion, sound, electricity,   magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Emphasis is placed on applications of   physics in modern technology. Prerequisite: MATH 111. Corequisites: MATH 112   and PHYS 216. (DEMAND)

 

PHYS 212. Technical   Physics II

Credit 3(4-0)

This is a continuation of   PHYS 211. Prerequisite: PHYS 211. Corequisite: PHYS 217. (DEMAND)

 

PHYS 216. Technical Physics   I Laboratory

Credit 1(0-2)

This is a qualitative and   quantitative study of certain physical systems; critical observations and   codification of data are emphasized. Corequisite: PHYS 211. (DEMAND)

 

PHYS 217. Technical   Physics II Laboratory

Credit 1(0-2)

This is a continuation of   PHYS 216. Corequisite: PHYS 212. (DEMAND)

 

PHYS 225. College Physics   I

Credit 3(3-0)

This is an algebra-based   course. No calculus is used. The course is a study of fundamental principles   of Newtonian mechanics, heat, and thermodynamics.  Prerequisite MATH 110 or 111; Corequisite:   PHYS 235. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 226. College Physics   II

Credit 3(3-0)

This is an algebra-based   continuation of PHYS 225. No calculus is used. The course covers the   fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism, wave motion, and optics.   Corequisite: PHYS 236. Prerequisite: PHYS 225. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 235. College Physics   I Laboratory

Credit 1(0-2)

This is a course that will   emphasize the importance of experimentation and observations in the   development of a physical science. A selected group of experiments will be   undertaken. Corequisite: PHYS 225. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 236. College Physics   II Laboratory

Credit 1(0-2)

This is a continuation of   PHYS 235. Corequisite: PHYS 226. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 241. General Physics   I

Credit 3(4-0)

This is a calculus-based   physics course that covers the fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics,   heat, and thermodynamics. Corequisites: MATH 132, PHYS 251. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 242. General Physics   II

Credit 3(4-0)

This is a continuation of   PHYS 241. It is  a  calculus-based study of physics, which covers   the fundamental principles of electricity, magnetism, wave motion, and   optics. Corequisite: PHYS 252. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 251. General Physics   I Lab

Credit 1(0-2)

This is a laboratory course   where a selected group of physics experiments will be performed. Emphasis is   placed on the development of experimental technique, analysis of data, and   physical interpretation of experimental results. Corequisite: PHYS 241. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 252. General Physics   II Lab

Credit 1(0-2)

This course is a   continuation of PHYS 251. Corequisite: PHYS 242. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 280. Introduction to   Space Science

Credit 3(3-0)

This course explores major   components of space science which  include the science that studies   properties of outer space (the region beyond the Earth's atmosphere), and/or   that requires a space-based operation. Space science areas include both   remote sensing studies of Earth and more distant objects including the near-Earth   space environment. Prerequisite: PHYS 101. (F;S)

 

PHYS 290. Introduction to   Geophysics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course provides an   introduction to the use of physical measurements to determine the structure   and composition of the solid Earth. Topics include plate tectonics, the   gravity and magnetic fields, elasticity and seismic properties of the Earth,   seismic waves, earthquakeseismology, isostasy, and elementary concepts in   geodynamics. The course summarizes current knowledge of the interior of the   Earth as determined by modern geophysical techniques. Prerequisite: PHYS 242.   (F;S)

 

PHYS 400. Physical   Mechanics I

Credit 3(3-0)

This is a course in   Newtonian mechanics and includes particle dynamics, conservation laws,   vibrational motion, central field motion, rigid body dynamics, Hamilton’s   principle and Lagrange’s equations. Prerequisites: PHYS 242 and PHYS 405. (F)

 

PHYS 401. Physical   Mechanics II

Credit 3(3-0)

This is an intermediate   course on classical mechanics. Topics include: Lagrangian and Hamiltonian   formalism, and special relativistic descriptions of the dynamics of particles   and rigid bodies. Applications in engineering will be considered.   Prerequisite: PHYS 400. (S)

 

PHYS 405. Mathematical   Physics

Credit 3(3-0)

This is a course in the   applications of mathematics to solutions of physical problems. It covers   selected topics in vector analysis, differential equations, special   functions, calculus of variations, eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, and   matrices. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (F;S)

 

PHYS 406. Introduction to   Modern Physics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is a study of   the basics of special relativity, quantum, atomic, molecular, statistical,   solid state, nuclear, and particle physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 242 or 226   and MATH 132. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 411.    Atmospheric Physics I 

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers the   applications of physical laws and principles including acoustics,   electricity, wave propagation, optics and radiation to the atmosphere.   Prerequisites: Math 231, Phys 242 or consent of instructor (F; S)

 

PHYS 412.    Atmospheric Physics II

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is a   continuation of Atmospheric Physics I and will include topics from basic   principles of cloud and precipitation physics, including the study of condensation   processes, freezing nucleation, ice crystal growth and weather modification.   Prerequisites: PHYS 411 (F; S)

 

PHYS 415.   Electromagnetism I 

Credit 3(3-0)

This is an intermediate   course in electromagnetism which along with PHYS 416 includes the study of   electric fields and potentials, electric current and magnetic fields,   solutions to Maxwell’s equations, plane waves, polarization, propagation in   media, wave guides and resonant cavities, refraction, and dispersion.     Prerequisites: PHYS 242 and PHYS 405. (F)

 

PHYS 416.   Electromagnetism II

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is the   continuation of PHYS 415. It is an intermediate course in Maxwell’s theory of   electromagnetism.  Electromagnetic phenomena are presented. This   includes electromagnetic wave propagation, reflection and refraction,   absorption and dispersion, dipole and point charge radiation. Relativistic   electrodynamics is also presented. Applications to problems in engineering   will be considered. Prerequisite: PHYS 415. (S)

 

PHYS 420. Quantum Physics   I

Credit 3(3-0)

This course presents   mathematical introduction required for understanding of quantum mechanics.   The solutions of the Schrodinger equation for a free particle and a particle   in one dimensional potentials (square, barrier, etc.), and the postulates of   quantum mechanics are presented. The simple harmonic oscillator problem is   solved. Other topics include angular momentum, spin, the two-particle problem   and the hydrogen atom. Prerequisite: PHYS 405 and PHYS 406. (F;S)

 

PHYS 422. Quantum Physics   II

Credit 3(3-0)

This is a continuation of   PHYS 420. This course deals with selected applications of quantum mechanics   to problems in atomic, molecular, nuclear, solid state physics and materials   science. Topics include: approximation methods, perturbation theory, and   scattering theory. Prerequisite: PHYS422. (F;S) 

 

PHYS 430. Thermodynamics and Statistical   Mechanics 

Credit 3(3-0)

This course reviews the   principles of thermodynamics, which include macroscopic variables,   thermodynamic equilibrium, the thermodynamic laws, and kinematic theory. The   fundamentals of statistical mechanics are covered which include   microcanonical and canonical ensembles, partition functions, Bose and Fermi   statistics, and the Boltzmann equation. Prerequisite: PHYS 400. (F;S)

 

PHYS 440. Applied   Geophysics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course examines the   field procedures employed to collect different types of geophysical data and   provides an introduction to the techniques used to analyze and interpret   these data for applied and engineering purposes.  It covers the major   methods employed in geophysical research.  Case studies, field and   computer exercises are also included.  Students will be giving hands-on   exercise with geophysical survey equipment. Prerequisite: PHYS 290 (F;S)

 

PHYS 441. Geophysical   Data Analysis

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers the   fundamental principles and methods that are commonly used to analyze   geophysical data. It includes the following topics: transforms, one-sided   functions, spectral factorization, resolution, matrices and multi-channel   time series, data modeling by least squares, waveform applications of least   squares, layers revealed by scattered wave filtering, and mathematical   physics in stratified media. Prerequisite PHYS 440. (F;S)

 

PHYS 442. Structural Geology

Credit 3(3-0)

This course studies the   processes of deformation and the geometry of deformed rocks by examining rock   deformation through the analysis of structures at both the microscopic and   outcrop scales. It will cover the following topics: the description of   geological structures; the kinematics and dynamics of folding and faulting;   stress, strain, and rheology; introduction to dislocation theory;   micro-structural analysis and principles of plate tectonics. Prerequisite   PHYS 290. (F;S)

 

PHYS 445. Introduction to Computations in Physics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course will introduce   and use computational techniques to analyze and solve physical problems.   Techniques to be used include visual programming language, graphing package,   spread sheet, symbolic packages, and other applications. Prerequisites: PHYS   241, PHYS 242 and a course in programming. (F;S)

 

PHYS 450. Waves and   Optics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course explores wave   phenomena. It covers the propagation, reflection, and refraction of light and   includes studies of lenses and optical instruments, interference,   diffraction, polarization, line spectra, and thermal radiation. Prerequisite:   PHYS 242. (F;S)

 

PHYS 465. Physics of Atoms, Molecules and   Nanosystems

Credit 3(3-0)

This is a study of one and   many electron atoms, molecular structure, and molecular spectra, of diatomic and   polyatomic molecules with introductory applications to nanoscience. The   course also covers other topics that include: Limits of smallness, quantum   nature of the nanoworld, self-assembled nanostructures in nature and   industry.  Prerequisite: PHYS 406. (S)

 

PHYS 467. Solid State   Physics

Credit 3(3-0)

This is a study of the   basics of the topics of binding, crystal structure, the reciprocal lattice,   phonons, free and nearly free electron gas models, energy bands, metals   semiconductors, insulators, super-conductors, and magnetic properties.   Prerequisite: PHYS 406. (F)

 

PHYS 468. Nuclear Physics and Elementary Particles

Credit 3(3-0)

This is a study of the   properties of the nucleus, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fission and   fusion, elementary particles, and particle accelerators. Prerequisite: PHYS   406. (F)

 

PHYS 470. Intermediate Physics Laboratory

Credit 2(1-2)

This is an intermediate   level laboratory course that emphasizes performing selected experiments in   electromagnetism, optics, atomic, nuclear and condensed matter physics. The   purpose of this course is to introduce students to proper laboratory skills   in data collection, analysis and reporting as well as giving them hands-on   knowledge of experiments and ideas which revolutionized the field of physics.   Prerequisites or corequisites: PHYS 406. (F;S)

 

PHYS 480. Introduction to   Solar Physics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course examines the Sun   as a star its radius, mass, and luminosity as well as measuring of these   parameters. It also explores other characteristics of the Sun such as   variability of rotation, magnetism, chemical structure, and planetary system.   The course will also address the structure of solar bowels and atmosphere.   Contemporary research on the Sun will also be discussed. Prerequisites PHYS   406. (F;S)

 

PHYS 490. Space Radiation

Credit 3(3-0)

This is a course in space   radiation environment, space exploration and radiation protection   requirements. The course covers cosmic rays and radiation environment,   biological effect induced by space radiation, effects of space radiation on   the spacecraft on-board electronics and equipment, space radiation   measurement, monitoring and dosimetry, radiation protection for space   exploration and shield design. Prerequisite: PHYS 242, MATH 231 (F;S)

 

PHYS 500. Special Topics in Physics

Variable Credit   (1-3)

This is a junior-senior   level course on selected topics in physics not covered in other courses. A   descriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit must have received   departmental approval before scheduling. Students’ records will carry both   course number and descriptive title. The course may be repeated to earn a   maximum of six credits. (DEMAND)

 

PHYS 510. Physics   Seminar 

Variable Credit   (1-3)

This is a study of current   developments in physics. The topics and the amount of credit will be   determined before the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.   (DEMAND)

 

PHYS 520. Advanced   Laboratory

Credit 2(1-3)

This is a laboratory course   designed to give students advanced laboratory training needed to perform   research. Selected experiments from classical mechanics, electromagnetism,   optics, atomic, nuclear and condensed matter physics would be performed. This   course may be repeated to earn a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite: PHYS   407. (F;S)

 

PHYS 530. Computational Techniques in Physics

Credit 3(2-3)

This course is an   application of numerical methods to solve problems in physics. It includes   root finding, systems of equations, integration, differentiation,   boundary-value problems, and Monte Carlo methods. Prerequisite: PHYS 405.   (DEMAND)

 

PHYS 531. Experimental   Physics

Credit 3(2-3)

This course surveys   experimental methods in physics. It involves experiment development,   including techniques in instrumentation design and data acquisition. Also, it   involves oral and written presentations of experimental results.   Prerequisite: PHYS 242. (DEMAND)

 

PHYS 550. Undergraduate   Research 

Variable Credit   (1-3)

This course involves student   participation in research conducted by faculty. Topics may be analytical   and/or experimental and encourage independent study. The amount of credit   will be determined before the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: Consent   of instructor. (F;S;SS)

 

PHYS 580. Introduction to High Energy Astrophysics

Credit 3(3-0)

The course will introduce   the fundamentals of the subject, with a focus on compact objects such as   black holes and neutron stars, and will also survey recent exciting developments   in this field. Topics include general relativity, accreting neutron stars and   black holes, and gamma-ray bursts. Prerequisite:

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ATMOPSPHERIC SCIENCES AND METEOROLOGY

ASME 200. Earth System Science: Exploring the   Connections

Credit 3(3-0)

This course investigates the interactions among the   atmosphere, ocean, ice, solid-Earth and biological systems.  It   introduces students to scientific inquiry and the scientific method through a   comprehensive study of the principles of the earth system using a case study   approach and the influence of human activity on the earth system. (F;S)

 

ASME 211. Computer   Applications in Meteorology

Credit 3(2-2)

This course is an introductory lecture and lab to   familiarize students with computational, meteorological, and graphic software   packages including, but not limited to FORTRAN and UNIX/LINUX, and Matlab.   Prerequisite:   Consent of instructor. (F;S;)

 

ASME 231. Atmospheric Thermodynamics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers the general aspects of thermodynamic   physical processes occurring within the atmosphere.  Topics included are   atmospheric statics and stability, saturation point analysis, aerosols,   nucleation, the structure and content of clouds, the development of physical   characteristics of precipitation, and the dynamics of rain systems.   Prerequisite: PHYS 241. (F;S)

 

ASME 251. Fundamentals of   Meteorology

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers the general character of the atmosphere   and its weather and climate systems, phenomena, and distributions of   variables (winds, temperature, pressure, moisture). Topics included are the   formal framework of the science; the application of basic classical physics,   chemistry, mathematics, and computational sciences to the atmosphere and   climate systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 107 or consent of instructor,   co-requisite: ASME 252. (F;S)

 

ASME 252. Meteorological   Analysis Laboratory

Credit 1(0-2)

This course provides laboratory exercises to supplement   ASME 251. Lab experiences include weather observations, weather map analysis,   use of the internet, forecasting practice, and climate modeling.   Prerequisite: CHEM 107 or consent of instructor; Co-requisite: ASME 251.   (F;S)

 

ASME 275. Weather Systems

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is an introduction to the basic   characteristics, of thermodynamics, and dynamics of atmospheric weather   systems on Earth and other planets. The students are exposed to observations   of weather systems while reviewing non-dimensional analysis, dynamics and   thermodynamics. Weather systems on earth are compared to those of other   planets, and analytical tools are used to gain insights into their basic   physics (F;S)

 

ASME 285. Broadcast   Meteorology 

Credit 3(3-0)

This course provides an introduction to the principles   of broadcast meteorology. Students will develop the skills necessary to   communicate scientific information with emphasis on weather forecasts. The   campus radio station will be used by the students to present weather   forecasts.  Prerequisites:  ASME 251 (F;S)

 

ASME 422. Weather   Analysis and Forecasting I  

Credit 4(3-3)

This course covers the analysis and forecasting of   synoptic weather systems with an emphasis on the basic tools of and its   application for weather analysis, including the theories of synoptic weather;   the application of thermodynamic and dynamic concepts and models to synoptic   weather analysis and the use of numerical models for synoptic weather   forecasting.   Prerequisites: ASME 211, ASME 251, MATH 231 or   consent of instructor. (F;S)

 

ASME 423. Weather   Analysis and Forecasting II 

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers the mesoscale analysis and   forecasting of mesoscale weather systems with an emphasis on the structure,   evolution, and dynamics of atmospheric phenomena which will include   hurricanes, mountain waves, land/sea breeze, mesoscale convective complexes   (MCCs), severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, squall lines.  Students will   use data for mesoscale weather analysis from a variety of observing   platforms, mesoscale models (such as WRF), case studies, and multimedia   instructional modules.   Prerequisite:  ASME 422 or consent of   instructor (F;S)

 

ASME 433. Atmospheric   Dynamics I 

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is an introduction to fluid dynamics in the   atmosphere. The basic laws of fluid mechanics are discussed as applied in the   atmospheric context. Topics covered are geophysical wave motion, the notion   of scale in fluid mechanics, and approximations for analyzing the structure   of large-scale atmospheric flows. Prerequisites: ASME 211, MATH 431 or   consent of instructor. (F;S)

 

ASME 434. Atmospheric Dynamics   II 

Credit 3(3-0)

This course provides additional coverage of atmospheric   fluid mechanics topics. Topics covered are quasi-geostrophic energetic   fronts, mean circulation planetary and equatorial waves, an overview of the   dynamics of the middleatmosphere, wave-mean flow interaction, spectral   methods, and tropical meteorology. Prerequisite: ASME 433. (F;S)

 

ASME 440. Atmospheric   Chemistry

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers an overview of chemical kinetics and   equilibrium; sources and sinks of pollutants; Photochemistry and smog   formation; air quality and human health issues; air pollution trends and acid   rain. It provides a quantitative basis for understanding complex chemical   interactions in the atmosphere. Prerequisite: CHEM 107 or consent of   instructor. (F;S)

 

ASME 481. Atmospheric   Fluid Dynamics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers advanced atmospheric fluid dynamics   concepts such as Coriolis accelerations, scale analysis, and appropriate   approximations of the complete governing equations. Prerequisites: MATH 431,   PHYS 241 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

 

ASME 491. Chemical and Optical Instrumentation for   Atmospheric Measurement

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers principles and performance of   chemical and optical instrumentation techniques for ground and aircraft-based   measurements. Prerequisites: PHYS 450 or consent of instructor. (F;S)

 

ASME 510.  Seminar in Atmospheric Sciences and   Meteorology 

Credit 1(1-0)

This is a study of current developments in atmospheric   sciences and meteorology.  The topics will be determined between a   student, advisor, and instructor of the course.  A student is required   to take this course twice.  (F;S)

 

ASME 550. Senior Project

Credit 6(0-12)

This course is an investigation of special topics on climate,   atmospheric science, and meteorology arranged between a student and a faculty   advisor. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. (F;S)

 

ASME 563. Atmospheric   Remote Sensing

Credit 3(3-0)

This course investigates interactions between   electromagnetic radiation and matter using examples drawn from remote sensing   techniques that are commonly used in atmospheric sciences. Prerequisites:   PHYS 416, or consent of instructor. (F;S)

GRADUATE COURSES IN PHYSICS WITH DESCRIPTIONS

PHYS 600. Classical Mechanics

Credit 3(3-0)

A theoretical treatment of   particle and rigid body dynamics. Topics include variational principles,   Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the physics of rotation, oscillations,   canonical transformations and Hamilton’s equations, and Hamilton-Jacobi   theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 401or Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 601 Special Topics   in Geophysics

Credit 3(2-2)

This is a graduate and/or   advanced undergraduate course on selected topics in applied and computational   geophysics. A descriptive title and syllabus must have departmental approval   prior to scheduling the course. Students' records will carry both course   number and descriptive title. The course may be repeated to earn a maximum of   six credit hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and senior or   Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 602 Introduction to   Geophysical Research 

Credit 3 (1-4)

This course involves student   participation in research training in geophysical sciences conducted by   faculty. It offers structured education and research training activities that   guide experiences in geophysical topics, techniques and research projects   involving geophysical surveys, physical modeling and numerical simulation.   The course may be repeated to earn a maximum of six credit hours. The course   is conducted in a lecture-laboratory format with one hour of lecture and four   hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 601 or permission of   instructor.

 

PHYS 605. Mathematical   Methods

Credit 3(3-0)

Covers topics in   mathematical physics: vector calculus, complex variables, Fourier theory,   special functions and boundary value problems, variational methods, and Green   functions. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

 

PHYS 615. Fundamentals of   Electromagnetism

Credit 3 (3-0)

This course covers the   essentials of classic electromagnetism: electrostatics, Laplace’s equations,   multipole expansion, electric polarization and dielectrics, magnetostatics,   magnetization, Faraday’s law of induction, and Maxwell’s equations.   Prerequisite: PHYS 416 or Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 620. Quantum   Mechanics I

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers the basic   theory and postulates of quantum mechanics with applications to   one-dimensional potential problems. The one electron atom, theory of angular   momentum, perturbation theory, approximation methods, and the matrix   formalism of quantum mechanics will be covered. Prerequisite: Senior or   Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 630. Statistical   Mechanics

Credit 3(3-0)

Fundamentals of classical   and quantum statistical mechanics: statistical ensembles and distribution   functions, non-interacting particles, ideal Fermi and Bose systems, treatment   of interacting systems, phase transitions, approaches to collective   phenomena. Prerequisite: PHYS 430 or Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 651. Advanced   Astrophysics

Credit 3 (3-0)

This course is a study of   radiation from stars and nebulae to determine the basic stellar   characteristics and the composition and physical conditions of matter in and   between the stars. It also investigates the structural properties of our   Milky Way galaxy, as evidenced by the spatial distribution. Prerequisite: Senior   or Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 680. Advanced Solar   Physics

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is an advanced   study of solar physics. It covers topics such as the Sun as a star, solar   photosphere and outer convection zone, granulation and related phenomena,   solar chromosphere and corona, sun’s radio emission, solar-terrestrial   relations, and  magnetic structure. It also treats the theory of   convection, wave motion in the presence of magnetism and gravity, coronal   heating theories, steady and nonsteady flows, dynamo theory, and the theory   of solar flares and other transient phenomena. Prerequisite: Senior or   Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 695. Space and   Atmospheric Science 

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is a study of   space and atmospheric science. It includes space-based operation, remote   sensing studies of the Earth and distant objects, in-situ measurement of the   space environment, composition of the Earth’s atmosphere, application of   thermodynamics to atmospheric problems, and development of the fundamental   equations of fluid motion. Applications to synoptic scale atmospheric   circulations, boundary layer effects, global circulation, and physical   meteorology are also treated. Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 715. Advanced   Electromagnetism

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is an advanced   study of electromagnetic phenomena: plane electromagnetic waves and wave   propagation, wave guides and resonant cavities, radiating systems, radiation   by moving charges, special theory of relativity, and applications of   electromagnetic theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 615.

 

PHYS 720. Quantum   Mechanics II 

Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers   applications of quantum mechanics to atomic, molecular, nuclear, solid state   and semiconductor physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 620.

 

PHYS 730. Optical Properties   of Matter

Credit 3(3-0)

Classical wave properties of   light and quantum mechanical treatment of the interaction of light and   matter: interference, diffraction, absorption, scattering, and polarization   of light, interaction with atoms, atomic structure, optical absorption and   emission, laser theory. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the   instructor.

 

PHYS 735. Physics of Atoms, Molecules and   Nanosystems

Credit 3(3-0)

This course is a study of   one- and many-electron atoms, and the molecular structure and spectra of   diatomic and polyatomic molecules with introductory applications to   nanoscience. The course also covers other topics that include the quantum   nature of the nanoworld and self-assembled nanostructures in nature and   industry. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 736. Spectroscopic Techniques

Credit 3 (3-0)

This course describes the   methods and instrumentation of several spectroscopic techniques such as laser   spectroscopy, optical resonance spectroscopy, supersonically cooled molecular   spectroscopy, multiple-photon spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman   scattering, Mössbauer spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy,   electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. Prerequisites:   PHYS 465, 420 or Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 737. Physics of   Solids

Credit 3 (3-0)

An advanced study of the   physics of solids with applications to metals, semiconductors, and   insulators. Topics include electronic structures, dynamics of electrons in   solids, transport properties, optical properties, magnetic properties, and   superconductivity. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the   instructor.

 

PHYS 738. Nuclear Physics

Credit 3(3-0)

Descriptions of properties   of the nuclear force and nuclear structure: nucleon-nucleon scattering,   nuclear scattering theory, phenomenological potential models, the shell   model, collective motion, giant resonances, direct and compound reactions,   few-body systems, heavy-ion physics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or   consent of the instructor.

 

PHYS 739. High Energy   Physics

Credit 3(3-0)

Theoretical and experimental   concepts in high-energy physics. Topics include elementary particles;   conservation laws; strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions; particle   accelerators; beams and detectors; strange particles; and quark models.   Prerequisite: PHYS 738 or Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 740. Graduate   Seminar

Variable Credit   (1-3)

A survey of current   developments in physics.

 

PHYS 743. Experimental   Methods 

Credit 3 (2-3)

Theory and techniques of   measurement in experimental physics: experimental design, detector   development, signal processing techniques, data acquisition, error analysis,   statistics and the treatment of experimental data. Prerequisite: Graduate   standing or consent of the instructor.

 

PHYS 744. Introduction to Computational Methods in   the Physical & Biological Sciences  

Credit 3(3-0)

This course will offer an   introduction to computational methods used in physics, chemistry and biology.   It will survey the various methods used in those areas and give hands-on   experience with some software. This may include, but not be limited to:   quantum chemistry calculations, electronic structure, empirical force fields   and molecular mechanics, energy minimization, Monte Carlo and molecular   dynamics simulations, structure of proteins, RNA/DNA sequence search and   pattern recognition.

 

PHYS 745. Computational   Physics

Credit 3 (2-3)

Computational approaches to   advanced physical problems. Includes ordinary differential equations,   boundary value and eigenvalue problems, matrix operations, Monte Carlo   methods, nonlinear equations, curve fitting, and approximation of functions.   Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

 

PHYS 750. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics I

Credit 3(3-0)

Along with PHYS 751 covers the Dirac equation and   elementary mass renormalization, propagator theory, second quantization, the   quantization of the electromagnetic field, Feynman graphs, calculations in   quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics, gauge theories, models of   electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. Prerequisite: PHYS 720 or   Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 751. Relativistic   Quantum Mechanics II

Credit 3(3-0)

A continuation of PHYS 750.   Prerequisite: PHYS750.

 

PHYS 760. Special Topics

Variable Credit   (1-3)

Studies in physics under   faculty guidance. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 

PHYS 770. Research

Variable Credit   (1-9)

This course is supervised research under the mentorship   of a faculty mentor. It is not necessarily

intended to serve as the project or thesis topic of a   master’s student.

 

PHYS 791. Masters Project

Credit 3(3-0)

The student will conduct a   research project under the supervision of an advisor. The project could be   experimental, theoretical, or a literature survey on a topic of interest to   the student. This course is available to project option students.   Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and masters standing.

 

PHYS 792. Masters Thesis

Variable Credit   (1-6)

The Master of Science thesis   research will be conducted under the supervision of a thesis advisor to the   completion of a masters thesis. The course is available to thesis option   students. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and masters standing.

 

PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS PROGRAM

PHYS 705. Physics for Science Teachers I  

Variable Credit   (1-6)

For in-service teachers.   Course covers fundamentals of astronomy and earth science. Full descriptive   title, syllabus and the amount of credit will have received departmental   approval before scheduling. Prerequisite: MATH 111 or equivalent.

 

PHYS 706. Physics for   Science Teachers II

Variable Credit   (1-6)

For in-service teachers.   Lecture and integrated lab study of the fundamental principles of mechanics,   thermodynamics, wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern   physics. Full descriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit will have   received departmental approval before scheduling. Focus: Mechanics and   Thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 111 or equivalent.

 

PHYS 707. Physics for   Science Teachers III

Variable Credit   (1-6)

A continuation of PHYS 706.   Focus: Wave motion and electricity and magnetism.

Prerequisite: PHYS 706 or   equivalent.

 

PHYS 708. Physics for   Science Teachers IV

Variable Credit   (1-6)

A continuation of PHYS 707.   Focus: Optics and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 707 or equivalent.

 

PHYS 709. Physics for   Science Teachers V

Variable Credit   (1-6)

A continuation of PHYS 708.   Focus: Modern Physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 708 or equivalent.

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