Courses Offered

MATH 099. Intermediate Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers elementary properties of real numbers and basic algebra through solving of quadratic equations by various means. It is required of students whose mathematics SAT scores are low and whose major curriculum includes either MATH 101 or 111.

MATH 101. Fundamentals of Algebra and Trigonometry I. Credit 3(3-0)

Numbers and their properties rational expressions, rational exponents, radicals, equations and inequalities in one variable, relations and functions are studied. Prerequisite: SAT MATH scores between 440 and 480, or SAT Subject MATH Level II scores between 430 and 460, or ACT MATH scores between 16 and 18, or Math Department-developed Algebra placement test scores between 15 and19, or "C‚" or better grade in MATH 099. (F;S;SS)

MATH 102. Fundamentals of Algebra and Trigonometry II. Credit 3(3-0)

This course is a continuation of MATH 101. Quadratic functions, systems of linear equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, circular functions, trigonometric functions, analytical trigonometry and the binomial theorem will be studied. Prerequisite: "C" or better grade in MATH 101. (F;S;SS)

MATH 103. College Algebra and Trigonometry for Engineers & Scientists I. Credit 3(3-0)

This course covers number systems, exponents, radicals, functions, linear and quadratic equations, complex numbers, inequalities, and graphs of polynomial and rational functions. Prerequisites: SAT MATH scores between 440 and 480; or ACT MATH scores between 16 and 18; or SAT Subject Math Level II Test scores between 430 and 460; or NCA&T Math Department-developed Algebra placement test scores between 15 and 19, or “C” or better grade in MATH 099. (F;S;SS)

MATH 104. College Algebra and Trigonometry for Engineers & Scientists II. Credit 3(3-0)

A continuation of Math 103. The course covers exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs, also the geometry of triangles with applications. Trigonometric identities are covered, and the binomial theorem. Prerequisite: "C" or better grade in MATH 103. (F;S;SS)

MATH 105. Seminar for Freshmen and New Mathematics Majors. Credit 1(1-0)

 This course will guide and encourage proper mathematics study habits, and develop an informed mathematics major who will be prepared to move through his or her curriculum. Seminar topics include: how to study mathematics; ethics-academic honesty, respect for property, civility; technology instruction; key information: special deadlines, required tests; and other related topics. (DEMAND)

MATH 110. Pre-Calculus for Engineers and Scientists. Credit 4(4-0)

 Algebraic properties of the number system, fundamental operations, exponents and radicals, functions and graphs, solutions of equations and systems of equations, trigonometric functions and identities, inequalities, logarithms, progressions, mathematical induction, binomial theorem, permutations and combinations will be studied. Prerequisites: SAT MATH scores between 490 and 540, or SAT Subject MATH Level II scores between 470 and 530, or ACT MATH scores between 19 and 21, or Math Department-developed Algebra placement test scores at least 20, or Math Department-developed Precalculus placement test scores between 13 and16. (F;S;SS)

MATH 111. College Algebra and Trigonometry. Credit 4(4-0)

 This course is a review of basic algebra; first and second degree equations; polynomial and rational functions-systems of equations-inequalities, right triangle trigonometry; and trigonometric identities and equations. Prerequisites: SAT MATH scores between 490 and 540, or SAT Subject MATH Level II scores between 470 and 530, or ACT MATH scores between 19 and 21, or Math Department-developed Algebra placement test scores at least 20. (F;S;SS)

MATH 112. Calculus for Non-Mathematics Majors. Credit 4(4-0)

 This course includes a brief treatment of basic concepts of differential and integral calculus with applications to business, economics, social and behavioral sciences; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: "C" or better grade in MATH 102, 110, or 111. (F;S;SS)

MATH 115. Mathematics of Business and Finance. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course includes a brief review of computing with whole numbers, decimals, fractions, percent, problem solving and the metric system. Simple interest, discount, partial payments, payroll wages and commission accounts, discounts and mark-ups, retailing, taxes, distribution of ownership, transactions in corporate securities, insurance, compound interest, annuities amortization and sinking funds will also be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 101, 110, or 111. (DEMAND)

MATH 123. Discrete Mathematics I. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is an introduction to applied discrete mathematics. Topics include set theory, introduction to logic, functions, recursion, relations, properties of integers, and elementary matrix algebra. Prerequisite: None. (F;S)

MATH 131. Calculus I. Credit 4(4-0)

 Limits and continuity of functions, the derivative, applications of the derivative, the definite integral and applications of the definite integral will be studied. Prerequisite: SAT MATH scores at least 550, or SAT Subject MATH Level II scores at least 540, or ACT MATH scores at least 22, or Math Department-developed Precalculus placement test scores at least 17, or ‚ÄúC‚Äù or better grade in MATH 104 or MATH 110. (F;S;SS)

MATH 132. Calculus II. Credit 4(4-0)

 Topics in analytic geometry, differentiation and integration of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, additional techniques and applications of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, Taylor‚Äôs Formula and infinite series will be studied. Prerequisite: ‚ÄúC‚Äù or better grade in MATH 131. (F;S;SS).

MATH 205. Lab Course in Mathematics Education I. Credit 1(0-2)

This course examines the application and practice of methods, techniques, and materials on instruction in a real mathematics university classroom situation under supervision.  Students will participate and engage in activities, which will aid in developing them as teachers.  These activities include but are not limited to tutoring, serving as a supplemental instructor, assessing the work of students in lower level mathematics classes. Prerequisite: MATH 131. (F;S;SS).

MATH 206. Lab Course in Mathematics Education II. Credit 1(0-2)

This course is a continuation of MATH 205 with more focus on student learning outcome assessment, portfolio development as well as peer critique. Prerequisite: MATH 205. (F;S;SS).

MATH 223. Discrete Mathematics II. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is a continuation ofMATH 123. Topics include Boolean algebra and applications elementary graph theory, trees and applications, and mathematical techniques for algorithm analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 123 or 311. (F;S;SS)

MATH 224. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. Credit 3(3-0)

 This is a general course covering fundamentals of statistics, central tendencies, variabilities, graphic methods, frequency distributions, correlations, reliability of measures, theory and methods of sampling and descriptive and analytical measures of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 111 or Math 131. (F;S;SS)

MATH 231. Calculus III. Credit 4(4-0)

 This course will cover plane curves and polar coordinates, vector and solid geometry, vector valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, applications of multiple integrals and vector analysis. Prerequisite: ‚ÄúC‚Äù or better grade in MATH 132. (F;S;SS)

MATH 240. Introduction to the Programming of Digital Computers. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course introduces the student to problem solving using Maple, Mathematica, or Matlab. It also provides an introduction to programming in the FORTRAN language. Prerequisite: MATH 112 or 131. (F;S;SS)

MATH 242. College Geometry. Credit 3(3-0)

Postulational systems, Euclid’s Parallel Postulate, a brief study of non-Euclidean geometries, Euclidean geometry as a special case of other geometries and defects of Euclid’s system will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (DEMAND)

MATH 311. Mathematical Logic and Proof Techniques. Credit 4(3-2)

 Emphasis is placed on development or writing skills and the ability to understand and develop proofs and logical arguments. Topics include quantifiers, rules of logic, and methods of mathematical proof, with applications to sets, integers, real numbers, functions, relations, and combinatorics. In the weekly 2-hour active learning lab, exercises and proofs are given to groups of two to four. The students present solutions and the solutions are critiqued by the students and the instructor. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (S)

MATH 397. Co-Operative Industrial Experience I Variable: 1-4

 This course is a supervised learning experience in a specified private or governmental facility. The student must be in industry full time for at least one summer or one semester and must perform supervised work that will enhance his/her educational background in an area related to mathematics and/or computer science. In addition to the supervisor‚Äôs evaluation on the field, the student‚Äôs performance will be evaluated by a departmental faculty committee, based upon reports, informal portfolios and forum and/or a seminar presented by the student upon his/her return to the University. (DEMAND)

MATH 398. Co-Operative Industrial Experience II Variable: 1-4

 The description of this course is the same as MATH 397 and is normally the second Co-op experience of the student related to mathematics and/or computer science. The maximum number of credit hours that may be earned by a student in the two courses MATH-397 and MATH 398 is six. (DEMAND)

MATH 420. History of Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is a survey of the development of mathematics by chronological periods with biographical references, illustrations of national and racial achievements and discussion of the evaluation of certain important topics of elementary mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (DEMAND)

MATH 430. Use of Technology in Teaching Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers the use of graphing calculators and mathematical software in doing and teaching of mathematics at the secondary and college levels. It includes and introduction to a calculator based programming language with in-depth treatment of algorithms and control structures. Application areas include algebra, geometry, trigonometry, precalculus, calculus, statistics, and elementary linear algebra. Prerequisites: MATH 224, 132. (DEMAND)

MATH 431. Introduction to Differential Equations (Formerly MATH 331) . Credit 3(3-0)

 This course will cover first order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, matrices and determinants, systems of linear algebraic equations, systems of linear differential equations, and Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (F;S;SS)

MATH 432. Introduction to Applied Mathematics (Formerly MATH 332) . Credit 3(3-0)

 This course will cover Fourier series, partial differential equations, complex variables, Taylor and Laurent series and residue theory. Prerequisite: MATH 431. (F;S;SS)

MATH 440. Numerical Methods. Credit 3(2-2) Numerical methods as related to programming techniques, interpolation, extrapolation, approximate solutions of algebraic and transcendental equations, simultaneous linear equations initial-value, characteristic-value and boundary-value problems, partial differential equations of the hyperbolic parabolic and elliptic types will be studied. Corequisite: MATH 132 and GEEN 160 or GEEN 161 or GEEN 163 or MATH 240. (F;S;SS)

MATH 450. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory (Formerly MATH 350). Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is an introduction to linear algebra and matrix theory; the algebra of matrices and its application to the solutions of systems of linear equations, determinants, real and complex vector spaces, bases, dimension, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MATH 132. (DEMAND)

MATH 460. Numerical Analysis. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is an introduction to principles and techniques of numerical mathematics. Topics in round-off error analysis, the approximation of functions, derivatives and integrals, and the numerical solutions of non-linear equations, ordinary differential equations and the systems of linear equations will be studied. Prerequisites: MATH 231, 240 and 450. (DEMAND)

MATH 480. Introduction to Mathematical Modeling . Credit 3(3-0)

 This course explores the fundamentals of both discrete and continuous mathematical modeling of problems in various fields where mathematics is used. The course will be project oriented and will emphasize multi-disciplinary problem solving. Prerequisites: MATH 231, 431: Corequisites: MATH 432, 450. (F;S)

MATH 505. Seminar in Mathematics. Credit 1(1-0)

 Methods of preparing and presenting seminars, presentation of seminars in current developments in mathematics and/or topics of interest which are not included in formal courses will be studied. Required for mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MATH 507 or 511. (DEMAND)

MATH 507. Intermediate Analysis I. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course includes a rigorous treatment of the fundamental principles of analysis, limits, continuity, sequences, series, differentiability and integrability and functions of several variables. Prerequisites: MATH 231 and 311, or consent of instructor. (F)

MATH 508. Intermediate Analysis II. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is a continuation of MATH 507. Prerequisite: MATH 507. (S)

MATH 511. Abstract Algebra I. Credit 3(3-0)

 Elementary properties of integers, rings, integral domains, and fields, properties of groups, including abelian groups, permutations, homomorphisms, normal subgroups, and factor groups will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 231 and 311. (F)

MATH 512. Abstract Algebra II. Credit 3(3-0)

 This is a continuation of MATH 511, including topics in commutative ring theory, Galois field theory and module theory. Prerequisite: MATH 511. (S)

MATH 550. Vector Analysis. Credit 3(3-0)

 Vector and tensor calculus, covariant and contravariant components; integral theorems; applications to geometry, mechanics and electromagnetic theory will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 431. (DEMAND)

MATH 600. Introduction to Modern Mathematics for Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0)

 Elementary theory of sets, elementary logic and propositional systems, nature and methods of mathematical proofs, structure of the real number system will be studied. Evaluation of instructional software and use of computer integrated instruction to teach pertinent concepts in secondary school mathematics will also be included. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 601. Tech App Sec School Math. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers techniques of teaching algebra, advanced algebra, trigonometry, and other secondary mathematics using graphing calculators, software packages and other technology. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 602. Modern Algebra. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers mappings, binary operations, groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and some applications to coding and cryptography. Prerequisite: MATH 311 or consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 603. Introduction to Real Analysis. Credit 3(3-0)

 The following topics will be covered in this course: elementary set theory, functions, axiomatic development of the real numbers, metric spaces, convergent sequences, completeness, compactness, connectedness, continuity, limits, sequences of functions, differentiation, the mean value theorem, Taylor‚Äôs theorem, Riemann integration, infinite series, the fixed point theorem, partial differentiation, and the implicit function theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 311 or consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 604. Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0)

 Re-examination of Euclidean geometry, axiomatic systems and the Hilbert axioms, introduction to projective geometry and other non-Euclidean geometries will be included. Prerequisite: MATH 600 or consent of the Department of Mathematics. (DEMAND)

MATH 607. Theory of Numbers. Credit 3(3-0)

 Divisibility properties of the integers, the Euclidean algorithm, congruences, diophantine equations, number-theoretic functions and continued fractions will be studied. Prerequisite: Twenty hours of college mathematics. (DEMAND)

MATH 608. Methods of Applied Statistics. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course introduces the SAS programming language, and uses it in the analysis of variance, both single and multifactor. It includes various methods of hypothesis testing and constructing confidence intervals. The course covers simple and multiple linear regression, including model building and variable selection techniques. Elements of time series and categorical data analysis are covered. Prerequisite: MATH 224. (DEMAND)

MATH 610. Complex Variables. Credit 3(3-0)

 The following topics will be covered in this course: complex number systems, limits of complex sequences, complex functions, continuity, limits of functions, derivatives, elementary functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, Prerequisite: Math 431 or consent of instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 620. Elements of Set Theory and Topology. Credit 3(3-0)

 Operations on sets, indexed families of sets, products of sets, relations, functions, metric spaces, general topological spaces, continuity, compactness and connectedness will be included. Prerequisites: MATH 231 and consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 623. Probability Theory and Applications. Credit 3(3-0) This course begins with an introduction to sample spaces and probability, including combinatorics. It covers continuous and discrete random variables, including multi-variate random variables and expectations; also marginal and conditional distributions are derived. The course introduces moment generating functions, and covers the central limit theorem and its applications. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (DEMAND)

MATH 624. Theory and Methods of Statistics. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course introduces methods of statistical estimation and inference including the following topics: sufficient statistics, confidence sets, hypothesis tests, and maximum likelihood methods. The theory of uniformly most powerful tests and the Neyman-Pearson Lemma are covered. Other topics include least squares estimation, the linear model, and Bayesian methods. Prerequisite: MATH 623. (DEMAND)

MATH 625. Math Elem Teachers, K-8. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is designed for in-service and prospective teachers who have as their goal to teach the basic skills and competencies of mathematics sought in today's world. The course emphasizes that the teacher first, must have the knowledge and skills in order to accomplish this goal. It stresses fundamentals of arithmetic, sets and operations, number systems, fractions, decimals, percents, estimation, consumer arithmetic, problem solving and traditional and metric geometry and measurement. (DEMAND)

MATH 631. Linear Non-Linear Programming. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course includes optimization subject to linear constraints; transportation problems, SIMPLEX algorithm; network flows; application of linear programming to industrial problems and economic theories; introduction to non-linear programming. Prerequisites: MATH 450 and a high level programming language. (DEMAND)

MATH 632. Games and Queue Theory. Credit 3(3-0) This course is a general introduction to game theory; two-person-non-zerosum-non-cooperative games; two-person cooperative games; reasonable outcomes and values; the minimax theorem. Introduction to queuing theory; single server queuing processes; many serve queuing processes; applications to economics and business. Prerequisite: MATH 224, MATH 450, or consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 633. Stochastic Processes. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course begins with a review of Probability and Random Variables. Markov Processes, Poisson Processes, Waiting Times, Renewal Phenomena, Branching Processes, Queuing System, Service Times are covered. Prerequisite: MATH 623 or consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 650. Ordinary Differential Equations. Credit 3(3-0)

 This is an intermediate course in ordinary differential equations with emphasis on applications. Topics include linear systems and various phase plane techniques for non-linear ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 431. (DEMAND)

MATH 651. Partial Differential Equations. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course includes introduction to complex variables and residue calculus, transform calculus, higher order partial differential equations governing various physical phenomena, nonhomogeneous boundary value problems, orthogonal expressions, Green‚Äôs functions and variational principles. Prerequisites: MATH 431 and 432. (DEMAND)

MATH 652. Methods of Applied Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers matrix theory, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, eigenvalue problem and its applications to systems of linear ODEs and mechanical vibrations, the simplest problems of calculus of variations, Euler equations, boundary conditions, extensions of Euler equations, Hamilton's Principles, constraints and Lagrange multipliers, introduction to integral equations, and solutions in iterative and other methods. Prerequisites: MATH 431 and 432. (DEMAND)

MATH 665. Principles of Optimization. Credit 3(3-0)

 Algebra, linear inequalities, duality, graph, transport network; linear programming; special algorithms; selected applications. An upper level course. Prerequisites: MATH 231 or equivalent and MATH 240 and 450. (DEMAND)

MATH 675. Graph Theory. Credit 3(3-0)

 Varieties of graphs, graph theory algorithms, and applications of graph theory to other disciplines will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 450. (DEMAND)

MATH 690. Scientific Programming for Mathematical Scientists. Credit 3(1-4)

This course covers the implementation of the computer in the Mathematical sciences. MATLAB will be used to apply algorithms and solve problems in areas such as differential equations and linear algebra. Probability and statistical problems will be studied through the “R” language. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing or consent of the instructor.

MATH 691. Special Topics in Applied Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0)

 Topics are selected from differential equations, numerical methods, operations research, applied mechanics and from other fields of applied mathematics. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing and consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 692. Independent Study. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course offers guided independent undergraduate study under faculty supervision in an approved mathematical topic. The course may be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. (F;S;SS)

MATH 700. Theory Func Real Variable I. Credit 3(3-0)

 The focus of this course is a careful study of the fundamental theorems of Lebesgue theory, including Lebesgue measure, differentiation and integration on the real line. Topics from set theory and point set topology are also included in this course. Prerequiste: MATH 507 or equivalent.

MATH 701. Theory Func Real Variable II. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is a continuation of MATH-700. The following topics will be covered in this course: general measure and integration, measure and outer measure, and some basic topics from functional analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 700. (DEMAND)

MATH 705. Graduate Seminar. Credit 1(1-0)

 The seminars will present current developments and ideas in applied mathematics and computational science. Topics explored may consist of mateial from various mathematics and computational science jornals, including discussion of resea by faculty and students. This course may be repeated for up to 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

MATH 706. Categorical Data Analysis. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course will include the following topics: Two-Way Contingency Table Inference for Two-Way Table, Models for Binary Response Variables, Log-linear Models, Testing in Loglinear Models, Multinomial Response Models and Estimation Theory for Parametric Models, and Computer Analysis of Categorical Data. Prerequisite: MATH 624. (DEMAND)

MATH 708. Nonparametric Statistics. Credit 3(3-0)

 The following topics will be discussed in this course: Order Statistics, Run Test for Trend, Goodness of Fit Tests, Rank Tests for One and Two Populations, Linear Rank Statistics, One-Way and Two-Way Nonparametric Analysis of Variance, and applications to practical problems. Prerequisite: MATH 624. (DEMAND)

MATH 709. Discrete Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers topics in discrete mathematics that are taught at the secondary school level, Topics covered include a review of logic, proofs and set theory; functions and relations; recursive and non-recursive sequences; graphs and graph albgorithms; directed graphs, trees and traversal algorithms, combinatorics; introduction to probability; and applications in political theory. Methods of teaching these topics will be discussed. (DEMAND)

MATH 710. Theory Func Comp Variable. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course includes basic theory of analytic functions, including Cauchy's theorem, conformal mappings, Taylor and Laurent series, and residue theory. Prerequisite: MATH- 507 or equivalent. (DEMAND)

MATH 712. Numerical Linear Algebra. Credit 3(3-0)

 Numerical analysis for solution of linear systems, approximation methods foreign values and eigenvectors, least squares solutions, ill-posed and ill-conditioned systems and error analysis are covered. Prerequisite: One programming language, MATH-450 or equivalent. (DEMAND)

MATH 713. Internship. Credit 6(6-0)

 Internship for Master's of Arts in Teaching students. (DEMAND)

MATH 717. Special Topics in Algebra. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers selected topics in algebra. Topics covered will be determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and graduate standing. (DEMAND)

MATH 720. Special Topics in Analysis. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers selected topics in analysis. Topics covered will be determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and graduate standing. (DEMAND)

MATH 721. Multivariate Statistical Analysis. Credit 3(3-0)

 Multivariate Normal Distribution, Infrerence About a Man Vector, Comparison of Several Multivariate Means, Analysis of Covariance Structure, Analysis of Dispersion, classification and Clustering Techniques and Some Applications of Multivariate Tests will be discussed in this course. Also, practical examples of industrial use will be addressed. Prerequisites: MATH 608 and MATH 624. (DEMAND)

MATH 723. Adv Topics in Applied Math. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course is designed to cover important topics in applied mathematics that may be desired from time to time for specific students in the graduate program. It may also be used as a vehicle for development of new courses for graduate program students. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 725. Graduate Design Project. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course requires independent project work on an advanced mathematical topic of interest to the student and a faculty member acting as the student's advisor. The topic must be approved by the advisor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 730. Thesis Research in Math. Credit 3(3-0)

 Students who select the thesis option must do advanced research in an area of interest. The research topic must be approved by the thesis advisor. (DEMAND)

MATH 731. Advanced Numerical Methods. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers numerical methods for solution of parabolic, elliptic and hyperbolic boundary value problems. Problems are selected from engineering applications. Both finite difference and finite element methods are studied. Prerequisite: MATH-460 or equivalent. (DEMAND)

MATH 733. Adv Probab & Stoch Process. Credit 3(3-0)

 The following topics will be discussed in this course: introduction to Lebesque integration. probability theory and random variables, laws of large numbers, central limit theorems, random walks, martingales, Markov processes and Markov chains, ergodic theorems and Brownian motion. Prerequisite: MATH 603 or permission of the instructor. (DEMAND)

MATH 752. Calculus Variat Ctrl Theory. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course covers the following topics: Functionals, Euler's equation, Lagrange multipliers. Kuhn-Tucker conditions, Pontryagin maximum principle, Weiserstrass- Edmann corner conditions. Euler-Legrange equations; first and second variational problems. Applications to engineering areas will also be included. Prerequisites: MATH 431, MATH 432 or equivalent. (DEMAND)

MATH 781. Math & Computational Modeling. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course explores the steps required to model and simulate a system, including discussion of generic governing equations, grid generation, basic numerical schemes, simulation strategies, and data analysis. Both discrete and continuous methods used in scientific applications will be examined. Representative applications include weather prediction, molecular dynamics, scheduling problems, and engine combustion modeling. Prerequisite: MATH 480. (DEMAND)

MATH 782. Scientific Visualization. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course explores concepts and techniques for visualization and its implementation, with emphasis on the use of visualization tools in mathematical simulation modeling. The course will provide practical experience with visualization packages in both X-Windows and mainframe environments. Prerequisite: MATH 781. (DEMAND)

MATH 788. Master's Comprehensive Exam. Credit 0(0-0)

 Examination. (DEMAND)

MATH 791. Interdis Comp Sci Proj I. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course continues development of skills required for independent research or problem-solving in the realm of computational science. The course requires completion of an agreed upon computational project, based upon a sound literature review, under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: MATH 480. (DEMAND)

MATH 792. Interdis Comp Sci Proj II. Credit 3(3-0)

 This course continues development of skills required for independent research or problem-solving in the realm of computational science. The course requires completion of an agreed upon computational project, based upon a sound literature review, under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: MATH 791. (DEMAND)

MATH 999. Con't of Thesis for Math. Credit 1(1-0)

Continuation of MATH 730. (DEMAND)

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