Majors -- 8 Concentrations

In the Department of Liberal Studies, students may major in one of the following eight concentrations:

African-American Studies

This concentration is for you if you are trying to develop a well-informed understanding of the African-American experience.

One of its themes is the story of African Americans that began in Africa millennia ago and has continued in the United States over more than 400 years. A second theme is the study of cultural expressions. The third theme is the ideas and ideals, struggles and triumphs of African Americans. A fourth is the comparison with other peoples of African descent and other human societies.

A student might pursue a position in a local, state or federal agency that focuses on African-American, minority, ethnic or cultural issues. It may be in a health care, social work, or other agency that serves people of diverse backgrounds. It may be in a group that promotes "understanding" among different peoples. It could be in an organization that has a multinational or multicultural work force. In addition, a graduate with this concentration might serve as a teacher or official in a school system that includes the study of the lives of African Americans in its curriculum.

With these possibilities, one good idea is to combine the study of African Americans with the study of related areas, such as health care, social work, education, business, public policy and/or public administration.

After acquiring the undergraduate B.A. degree, students could study for an M.A. degree and then a Ph.D., leading to a professorship at a college or university and conducting research on many of the still-unexplored topics on the African-American experience.

Courses In

THE CONCENTRATION IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

Students must complete twenty-four (24) semester hours from the following courses, selecting a minimum of one course from each of four subject areas:


DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

ART

310

African-American Art

2 credits

ENGL

203

Humanities Perspectives of the South

3 credits

ENGL

209

The History, Literary Connections and Social Relevance of Hip-Hop

3 credits

ENGL

236

A Survey of Early African-American Women's Poetry

3 credits

ENGL

237

Standing and Testifying: African-Ameican Women Poets of the Harlem Renaissance

3 credits

ENGL

239

American Griots: Black Women Storytellers in the 20th Century

3 credits

ENGL

318

African-American Film and Culture

3 credits

ENGL

333

Survey of African-American Literature I

3 credits

ENGL

334

Survey of African-American Literature II

3 credits

ENGL

342

African-American Male Writers

3 credits

ENGL

343

African-American Women Writers

3 credits

ENGL

345

Survey of African-American Men's and Women's Autobiographical Writings

3 credits

ENGL

407

African-American Drama

3 credits

ENGL

408

The African-American Novel

3 credits

ENGL

505

Interdisciplinary Research Methods in African-American Literary Studies

3 credits

FOLA

404

Afro-Hispanic Literature

3 credits

FOLA

417

Literature in Afro-French Expression

3 credits

FOLA

424

Afro-German Studies

3 credits

HIST

201

African-American History to 1877

3 credits

HIST

202

African-American History Since 1877

3 credits

HIST

203

NC A&T State University: A Legacy of Social Activism and Aggie Pride

3 credits

HIST

215

History of Africa to 1800

3 credits

HIST

216

History of Africa Since 1800

3 credits

HIST

272

Oral History

3 credits

HIST

273

African-American History and Museum Collecting

3 credits

HIST

306

History of Women Since 1800

3 credits

HIST

320

African History Through Art and Archeology

3 credits

HIST

321

Cultural History, Ethnicity and Ethnographic Collections in America

3 credits

HIST

351

African-American History in the American West

3 credits

HIST

355

African-American Historical Perspectives on Africa

3 credits

HIST

405

African-American Religious History

3 credits

HIST

416

History of African American Culture

3 credits

HIST

417

Colonialism and Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean

3 credits

HIST

425

Topics in African-American Intellectual/Philosophical History

3 credits

HIST

440

Comparative Slavery of the Americas

3 credits

HIST

460

The Old South

3 credits

HIST

461

History of the New South

3 credits

JOMC

302

Minorities in Mass Media

3 credits

JOMC

403

Black Press in the United States

3 credits

LIBS

220

Race, Class and Environmental Quality

3 credits

LIBS

221

Genes, Race and Class

3 credits

LIBS

223

African-American Culture Through Sports

3 credits

LIBS

225

Race, Crime and Social Injustice

3 credits

LIBS

235

Race Against Empire: African-American Anti-Imperialism, 1900-1975

3 credits

LIBS

236

Africana Thought and Practice

3 credits

LIBS

402

Historical Memory

3 credits

LIBS

499

Independent Study/Senior Research Project

3 credits

PHIL

264

Contemporary African-American Philosophy

3 credits

PHIL

312

Political Philosophy of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

3 credits

PHIL

404

Philosophy, Marxism and the Africana World 

3 credits

MUSI

219

History of Gospel Music

3 credits

MUSI

220

History of Black Music in America

3 credits

MUSI

221

History of Jazz

3 credits

POLI

447

African-American Political Theory

3 credits

POLI

460

Southern Politics

3 credits

POLI

643

Urban Politics and Government

3 credits

SOCI

306

Minority Group Relations

3 credits

SOWK

414

The Black Experience

3 credits

THEA

467

African-American Drama I

3 credits

THEA

468

African-American Drama II

3 credits

Additionally, every student must take two Related Electives (select courses not listed above) and complete a senior research project (LIBS499). [Link to SRRP page of website.]
Please Note: A final grade of "C" or better is required for all Concentration Studies, Related Electives, ENGL100/101, and HIST206/207 (previously HIST100/101) classes.

Please note: In addition to 30 credit hours of Concentration courses, all Liberal Studies Majors must take the following three 3 credit courses:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

LIBS

200

Introduction to Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

300

Research Methods in Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

499

Senior Research Project

3

What should I do now?

Anyone wishing to become a Liberal Studies major with a concentration in African-American Studies should contact the Chair of the Liberal Studies Department, Dr. Beverly Grier, at 336-256-2165 (voice), or 333-256-2411 (fax), or visit the office in Room A456 of the General Classroom Building. After a review of the curriculum and admission to Liberal Studies, students are advised by an African-American Studies Concentration Coordinator for course selection, career advising, graduate school advising, etc.

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Cultural Changes and Social Development

What is Cultural Change and Social Development? How can I use this concentration when I graduate?

The one constant in our lives is change, which is going on all around us. Not only are we changing, but so is the social and cultural matrix in which we live. The concentration in Cultural Change and Social Development gives students a background in how cultures and societies work and the ways they change. It focuses on the nature and direction of cultural and social change in countries and societies. It also emphasizes the impact of globalization on this change.

The concentration includes courses in the social sciences that help students understand society and culture, develop skills in data analysis, and grasp issues in the dynamics of human populations. It provides a wide range of electives that allow students to explore geographic areas and specific topics and give them additional, but needed knowledge and skills.

Cultural Change and Social Development students are ready to play important roles in many causes and organizations or to continue their education in graduate and professional school. The organizations include the United Nations, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, private global industries, international nongovernmental organizations such as CARE, the Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, Oxfam America, and International Organization on Migration. Students can also pursue opportunities with a variety of domestic nongovernmental organizations that deal with issues of culture, diversity and poverty in the U.S., such as the Poverty Law Center, Urban League, and NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

The degree also prepares students for graduate and professional programs in sociology, anthropology, development studies, international law, and public relations, among others, leading to careers in the private or public sector and in college or university teaching and research.

COURSES IN

THE CULTURAL CHANGE AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT CONCENTRATION

Students must complete eighteen (18) required semester hours, to be allocated as follows:

SOCI

100

Principles of Sociology

3 credits

SOCI

101

Basic Quantitative Writing and Computer Skills in Sociology

3 credits

SOCI

200

Introduction to Anthropology

3 credits

SOCI

300

Topics in Cultural Anthropology

3 credits

SOCI

473

Introduction to Population Studies

3 credits

SOWK

413

The Community

3 credits

Students must complete six (6) more semester hours choosen from the following:

EASC

201

The Earth - Man's Environment

3 credits

ECON

515

Comparative Economic Systems

3 credits

HIST

312

History of Religions

3 credits

LIBS

223

African-American Culture Through Sports

3 credits

LIBS

227

Race, Class and Culture in South Africa

3 credits

LIBS

230

The HIV/AIDS Crisis in Africa

3 credits

LIBS

303

Consumer Culture

3 credits

LIBS

305

Race and Class in Caribbean Society

3 credits

LIBS

307

Food and the Global Community

3 credits

LIBS

309

Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Extraordinary Violence

3 credits

LIBS

312

Gender and Development in Africa

3 credits

LIBS

320

Doing Culture

3 credits

LIBS

401

War and Culture

3 credits

PHIL

265

World Religions

3 credits

SOCI

306

Minority Groups

3 credits

SOWK

412

Major Problems in Family Functioning

3 credits

SPAN

306

Americanos: Latino Culture in the U.S. (Taught in English)

3 credits


In addition to these 24 credit hours, students must take two Related Electives (for a total of 6 credit hours of related courses not listed above) and the 3 credit Senior Research Project (LIBS499).

Please Note: A final grade of "C" or better is required for all Concentration Studies, Related Electives, LIBS601, ENGL100/101, and HIST206/207 (previously HIST100/101) classes.

Please note: In addition to 30 credit hours of Concentration courses, all Liberal Studies Majors must take the following three 3 credit courses:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

LIBS

200

Introduction to Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

300

Research Methods in Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

499

Senior Research Project

3

What should I do now?

Anyone wishing to become a Liberal Studies major with a concentration in Cultural Change and Social Development should contact the Chairperson of the Liberal Studies Department, Dr. Beverly Grier, at 336-256-2165 (voice) or 336-256-2411 (fax), or visit the office in A455 General Classroom Building. After a review of the curriculum and admission to Liberal Studies, students are advised by a Cultural Change and Social Development Concentration Coordinator for course selection, career advising, graduate or professional school advising, etc.

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Dance

What is the Dance Concentration? What can I do with this concentration when I graduate?

COURSES IN THE DANCE CONCENTRATION

All students who seek to concentrate in Dance must audition and be accepted into the program. All majors are required to participate in on-campus and community dance company productions as performers and/or technical assistants. Students must successfully complete twenty-four (24) semester hours from the following:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

DANC

110

Introduction to Ballet

1 credit

DANC

200

Beginning Modern Dance

1 credits

DANC

210

Dance Company and Repertory (at least 2 semesters)

4 credits

DANC

220

Dance Appreciation

3 credits

DANC

300

Dunham Technique I

2 credits

DANC

301

Dunham Technique II

2 credits

DANC

330

Dances of Africa and the Caribbean

2 credits

OR

DANC

331

World Dance and Culture

2 credits

DANC

450

Blacks in Western Theatrical Dance

3 credits

DANC

500

Dance Ethnography

3 credits

DANC

550

Summer Abroad

3 credits

Please note: In addition to 30 credit hours of Concentration courses, all Liberal Studies Majors must take the following three 3 credit courses:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

LIBS

200

Introduction to Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

300

Research Methods in Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

499

Senior Research Project

3

What should I do now?

Anyone wishing to become a Liberal Studies major with a concentration in Dance should contact the Chair of the Visual and Performing Arts Department, Dr. Eleanor Gwynn, at 336-256-2137 gwynne@ncat.edu or visit the office in A321 General Classroom Building. After a review of the curriculum and admission to Liberal Studies, students are advised by the Chair for course selection, career advising, graduate school advising, etc.

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Individualized Studies Concentration

What is Individualized Studies? What can I do with this Concentration when I graduate?

The Individualized Studies Concentration of the Department of Liberal Studies serves a unique purpose for high-achieving students at North Carolina A&T State University.

  • Students who wish to design their own concentration because they cannot find an existing degree program at the University that meets their needs and interests, (e.g. Environmental Ethics, which combines politics, ethics, and science in a study of environmental sustainability).
  • In consultation with the Chairperson, an interest student applies for admission. The application packet consists of:
    • A cover letter, requesting admission;
    • A list of proposed courses from at least three disciplines from which the student will choose the concentration couses;
    • An explanation of the connections between the courses listed, along with a title for the concentration;
    • A one-page discussion of the graduate school program or career for which the concentration prepares the students; and,
    • Proof of eligibility for the University Honor's Program consideration.
    • Transfer students must have at least a 3.0 GPA.
  • The student will complete ALL general education requirements (as shown in the LIBERAL STUDIES CURRICULUM PATTERN [NEW]). They must take a minimum of eighteen (18) credit hours of Liberal Studies courses in addition to LIBS200 / Introduction to Liberal Studies, LIBS300 / Research Methods in Liberal Studies, LIBS499 / Senior Research Project, and LIBS475 / LIBS Capstone Course for a total of thirty (30) hours of Liberal Studies courses. They must take six (6) credit hours in any foreign language and allowed six (6) credit hours of Free Electives. A total of 124 credit hours are required for graduation with a B.A. in Liberal Studies, with an Individualized Studies Major.

The appropriate arrangement / paperwork will inform the Registrar of the title of the Individualized Studies Concentration to be recorded on the successful students' academic transcript.

A final grade of "C" or better is required for all General Education Courses and LIBS Courses.

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International Studies

What is International Studies? What can I do with this Concentration when I graduate?

A concentration in International Studies helps if you seek a career requiring an understanding of the parts or whole of the world. You may work in international politics and diplomacy in the U.S. State Department, a U.S. embassy abroad, the United Nations or one of its agencies such as the International Labor Organization, UNAIDS, or the UNICEF/United Nations Children Fund. Your role in U.S. national security may be at the Department of Homeland Security, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Defense Intelligence Agency, or the National Security Agency.

In international business and economics, you may work in public relations, advertising, marketing, or sales in global company such as Coca Cola or Toyota. To help U.S. (and North Carolinian) business interests abroad, apply to the U.S. (or North Carolina) Chamber of Commerce or the U.S. (or North Carolina) Department of Commerce. Or, you may seek a position with a global lender, such as the World Bank or the International Monetary Fund.

Employers in humanitarian aid include nongovernmental organizations (NGO) such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Doctors Without Borders or the Red Cross. In development, the U.S. Agency for International Development, UNICEF or UNESCO at the United Nations, or NGOs such as Oxfam America, CARE, or Operation Crossroads are possibilities. In the areas of peace and diplomacy, you might find a position at the U.S. State Department, the United Nations, or an NGO that focuses on justice, human rights or conflict resolution. If you have a particular regional interest, you may specialize in research and analysis of affairs in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, or Europe.

The Foreign Language requirement of the International Studies Concentration (4 consecutive semesters, for a total of 12 semester hours) provides graduates with language proficiency that will enable them to secure and be successful in their position in the international arena.

A degree in Internal Studies also prepares you for further studies at the M.A. and Ph.D. levels on regional and international/global issues.

Yes! The concentration prepares you for many opportunities in the "global village" of the 21st century.

COURSES FOR THE CONCENTRATION IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Students must complete six (6) consecutive semester hours of study beyond the elementary level for a total of twelve (12) hours in one language. The other eighteen semester hours must be from the following:

ECON

505

International Economic Relations

3 credits

ECON

537

International Marketing

3 credits

ENGL

230

World Literature I

3 credits

ENGL

231

World Literature II

3 credits

ENGL

242

Postcolonial Women Writers

3 credits

ENGL

243

Literature by Women of Africa and the African Diaspora

3 credits

ENGL

336

Postcolonial Novel

3 credits

ENGL

409

Literature of the African Diaspora

3 credits

ENGL

416

Major African Women Writers

3 credits

ENGL

417

African Literature from 1945 through the 1960s

3 credits

ENGL

420

Humanities III, Great Ideas of World Civilization

3 credits

FOLA

417

Literature of Afro-French Expression

3 credits

GEOG

210

World Regional Geography

3 credits

GEOG

322

Economic Geography

3 credits

HIST

215

History of Africa to 1800

3 credits

HIST

216

History of Africa Since 1800

3 credits

HIST

313

Perspectives on Globalization

3 credits

HIST

321

Cultural History, Ethnicity and Ethnographic Collections

3 credits

HIST

332

The Modern Middle East

3 credits

HIST

355

African-American Perspectives on Africa

3 credits

HIST

402

The Rise of Christianity

3 credits

HIST

407

American Diplomatic History Since 1900

3 credits

HIST

409

Modern Europe Since 1815

3 credits

HIST

412

Modernization of Africa from 1920 to Present

3 credits

HIST

414

Nationalism

3 credits

HIST

417

Colonialism and Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean

3 credits

HIST

418

Conflict and Change in Postcolonial Latin America

3 credits

HIST

421

Exploring Europe's "Others"

3 credits

HIST

422

Colonizer and Colonized: British Imperial History

3 credits

HIST

423

History of Women in Africa

3 credits

HIST

431

History of the Far East to 1800

3 credits

HIST

432

United States - East Asian Relations

3 credits

HIST

435

Global History Since 1945

3 credits

HIST

444

History of Africa Since 1945

3 credits

HIST

450

Modernization in Historical Perspective

3 credits

HIST

451

Russian History

3 credits

HIST

616

Seminar in African History

3 credits

JOMC

601

International Communications

3 credits

LIBS

220

Race, Class and Environmental Quality

3 credits

LIBS

227

Race, Class and Culture in South Africa

3 credits

LIBS

230

The HIV/AIDS Crisis in Africa

3 credits

LIBS

235

Race Against Empire: African-American Anti-Imperialism, 1900-1975

3 credits

LIBS

236

Africana Thought and Practice

3 credits

LIBS

301

Ethno-Nationalism and the Reconstruction of Nations

3 credits

LIBS

305

Race and Class in Caribbean Culture

3 credits

LIBS

307

Food and the Global Community

3 credits

LIBS

309

Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Extraordinary Violence

3 credits

LIBS

312

Gender and Development in Africa

3 credits

LIBS

320

Doing Culture

3 credits

LIBS

401

War and Culture

3 credits

PHIL

265

World Religions

3 credits

POLI

444

International Relations

3 credits

POLI

445

Problems of Contemporary Africa

3 credits

POLI

644

International Law

3 credits

SOCI

200

Introduction to Anthropology

3 credits

SOCI

300

Topics in Cultural Anthropology

3 credits

Additionally, every student must take two Related Electives (related courses not listed above) and complete a Senior Research Project (LIBS601). [Link to SRRP website.]

Please note: In addition to 30 credit hours of Concentration courses, all Liberal Studies Majors must take the following three 3 credit courses:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

LIBS

200

Introduction to Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

300

Research Methods in Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

499

Senior Research Project

3

What should I do now?

Anyone wishing to become a Liberal Studies major with a concentration in International Studies should contact the Chair of the Liberal Studies Department at 336-256-2165 (voice) or 336-256-2411 (fax) or visit the office in Room A456 General Classroom Building. After a review of the curriculum and admission to Liberal Studies, students are advised by an African-American Studies Concentration Coordinator for course selection, career advising, graduate school advising, etc.

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Pre-Law

What is Pre-Law? How can I use this concentration when I graduate?

The Liberal Studies Pre-Law Concentration is an interdisciplinary course of study designed to foster students’ logical reasoning, analytic and problem-solving skills, critical reading abilities, written composition, oral communication, and listening abilities. Although these skills are designated by the American Bar Association as ideal for providing “a sound foundation for a legal education,” a Pre-Law degree also prepares students for administrative and management careers, governmental positions, journalism and media careers, and provides excellent pre-professional training for further graduate studies.

The Pre-Law curriculum offers students broad range of interdisciplinary exposure to develop students’ writing, speaking and thinking skills and to foster an understanding of American institutions and values. The Pre-Law Concentration courses are intended to help students understand the relationship between law and morality and the role of law in society, develop skills in argument analysis, and explore various areas of the law.

Liberal Studies Pre-Law majors who select a law school career path receive intensive advising, LSAT preparation guidance, assistance with personal statement preparation, direction in letters of recommendation selection, and support throughout the Law School Admission Council’s application process. Pre-Law majors are also encouraged to participate actively in the Henry Frye Pre-Law Society, named after a distinguished A&T alumnus who in 1983 became the first African-American to serve on the Supreme Court of North Carolina. Students who are seeking a major with academic rigor and that provides training in skills essential for professional employment should consider a Liberal Studies Pre-Law major.

COURSES IN THE PRE-LAW CONCENTRATION

Students must successfully complete twenty-four (24) semester hours from the following courses, selecting a minimum of one course from each of three subject areas:

BUAD

361

Legal Environment of Business

3 credits

BUAD

462

Business Law

3 credits

BUAD

463

Commercial Law

3 credits

HIST

313

Perspectives on Globalization

3 credits

HIST

410

American Constitutional History

3 credits

LIBS

225

Race, Crime and Social Injustice

3 credits

PHIL

262

Introduction to Logic

3 credits

PHIL

314

Social and Political Philosophy

3 credits

PHIL

402

Philosophy of Law

3 credits

POLI

200

American Government and Politics

3 credits

POLI

542

American Constitutional Law

3 credits

POLI

543

Civil Liberties

3 credits

POLI

644

International Law

3 credits

CRJS/SOWK

503

Juvenile Delinquency

3 credits

CRJS/SOWK

670

Law and Society

3 credits

SPCH

552

Persuasive Communication

3 credits

In addition to these 24 credits, students must take two Related Elective courses (for a total of six (6) credit hours in related courses not listed above) and the 3 credit Senior Research Project (LIBS601).

Please note: A final grade of "C" or better is required for all Concentration Studies, Related Elective, ENGL100/101 and HIST206/207 (formerly HIST100/101) courses.

 

Please note: In addition to 30 credit hours of Concentration courses, all Liberal Studies Majors must take the following three 3 credit courses:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

LIBS

200

Introduction to Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

300

Research Methods in Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

499

Senior Research Project

3

What should I do now?

Anyone wishing to become a Liberal Studies major with a concentration in Pre-Law should contact the Chairperson of the Liberal Studies Department at 336-256-2165 or visit the office in A455 General Classroom Building. After a review of the curriculum and admission to Liberal Studies, students are advised by a Pre-Law Concentration Coordinator for course selection, career advising, professional or graduate school advising, etc.

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Race, Class, and Culture

What is Race, Class and Culture? What can I do with this concentration when I graduate?

This concentration will help you understand the role that forces such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, and religion play in shaping human societies and cultures. Integrating ideas from the humanities, social sciences and physical sciences, the concentration will teach you how to "read" your culture and others.

You will learn how to recognize how culture influences identity, representation, knowledge and power. You will learn how to identify, ask questions about and develop answers to cultural problems of contemporary societies.

You will acquire concepts and skills useful for analyzing artifacts such as music, literature, television and film, for scrutinizing institutions and systems such as health care, education and justice, and for examining technologies, industries and corporations.

You will connect the ideas and concepts you study to problems and opportunities in our local, national, and global communities. You will develop new insights into the major issues our culture and other cultures face in this age of globalization and rapid societal change.

The concentration will prepare you for advanced academic programs (M.A. or Ph.D.) that require the ability to (1) apply theory and (2) recognize how groups and societies reconcile their histories, build community and confront the future.

The Race, Class and Culture Concentration will help you succeed in positions that call for critical thinking, writing, reading, and "people" skills, whether in the private or public sector of the economy. In particular, you will be able to help make the multicultural workplace of today and tomorrow a just and humane space for human existence and productivity.

COURSES IN THE CONCENTRATION IN RACE, CLASS AND CULTURE

Students must successfully complete three (3) semester hours of LIBS201, Introduction to Race, Class and Culture, preferably in the first or second year of their concentration studies. The remaining twenty-one (21) semester hours must be selected from the following:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

BIOL

468

Biology, Technology and Ethics I

3 credits

COMP

390

Social Implications of Computing

3 credits

ENGL

206

Film and Culture

3 credits

ENGL

209

History, Literary Connections and Social Relevance of Hip-Hop

3 credits

ENGL

242

American Riots: Black Women Storytellers in the 20th Century

3 credits

ENGL

316

Hip-Hop Discourse

3 credits

ENGL

336

Postcolonial Novel

3 credits

ENGL

409

Literature of the African Diaspora

3 credits

FCS

332

Cultural Aspects of Food

3 credits

FCS

425

Fashion Motivation

3 credits

FCS

482

Global Trends and National Perspectives in Clothing and Textiles

3 credits

HIST

321

Cultural History, Ethnicity and Ethnographic Technology

3 credits

HIST

415

The Automobile and the Making of Modern America

3 credits

HIST

477

Technology, Empire and Popular Culture

3 credits

HIST

610

Seminar in the History of Twentieth Century Technology

3 credits

LIBS

220

Race, Class and Environmental Quality

3 credits

LIBS

223

African-American Culture Through Sports

3 credits

LIBS

225

Race, Crime and Social Injustice

3 credits

LIBS

227

Race, Class and Culture in South Africa

3 credits

LIBS

230

The HIV/AIDS Crisis in Africa

3 credits

LIBS

301

Ethni-Nationalism and the Reconstruction of Nations

3 credits

LIBS

302

Media Analysis

3 credits

LIBS

303

Consumer Culture

3 credits

LIBS

304

The American South

3 credits

LIBS

305

Race and Class in Caribbean Culture

3 credits

LIBS

306

Gender, Technology and Computer Culture

3 credits

LIBS

307

Food and the Global Community

3 credits

LIBS

308

Historical, Social and Cultural Perspectives of Technology

3 credits

LIBS

309

Becoming Evil: Why Ordinary People Commit Extraordinary Violence

3 credits

LIBS

312

Gender and Development in Africa

3 credits

LIBS

320

Doing Culture

3 credits

LIBS

401

War and Culture

3 credits

LIBS

402

Historical Memory

3 credits

LDAR

102

Environmental Design Ethics

3 credits

PHIL

265

World Religions

3 credits

SOCI

304

Social Aspects of Human Sexuality

3 credits

SOCI

406

Criminology

3 credits

SPAN

306

Americanos: Latino Culture in the U.S. (Taught in English)

3 credits

In addition to these 24 credit hours, students must take two Related Electives courses (related to courses listed above, for a total of six (6) credit hours ) and the 3 credit Senior Research Project (LIBS601). [Link to SRRP website page.]

Please Note: A final grade of "C" or better is required for all Concentration Studies, Related Electives, ENGL100/101 and HIST206/207 (formerly, HIST100/101) courses.

 

Please note: In addition to 30 credit hours of Concentration courses, all Liberal Studies Majors must take the following three 3 credit courses:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

LIBS

200

Introduction to Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

300

Research Methods in Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

499

Senior Research Project

3

What should I do now?

Anyone wishing to become a Liberal Studies major with a concentration in Race, Class and Culture should contact the Chair of the Liberal Studies Department at 336-256-2165 (voice) or 336-256-2411 (fax) or visit the office in Room A456 General Classroom Building. After a review of the curriculum and admission to Liberal Studies, students are advised by a Race, Class, and Culture Concentration Coordinator for course selection, career advising, graduate school advising, etc.

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Woman's Studies

What is Women's Studies? How can I use this concentration when I graduate?

A student who understands the particular roles, experiences, and challenges of women in the U.S. and around the world will realize that gender is extremely important in society. For this reason, at North Carolina A&T State University, the introduction of the Women's Studies Concentration represents one of the truly exciting and innovative curriculum changes.

As a graduate of this concentration, you could build upon the education you receive here in further education in gender studies (M.A. and Ph.D.). Then you may work as a professor at a college or university or as a researcher or leader of a social services agency that is oriented toward women's issues. B.A. graduates can seek employment with public or private agencies, organizations and corporations that interact with families, groups of women and individual women. Health care providers, public relations agencies, family support agencies, battered women's shelters, rape crisis centers, human development agencies such as those that work with formerly incarcerated women, political organizations and educational institutions are just a few of the employers who seek people who have an interdisciplinary (sociological, psychological, economic, political, religious and cultural) understanding of the historical and present-day status of women.

The roles and perspectives of women, who make up more than 50 percent of the world's population, have changed. Women's Studies graduates help all of society adjust to - indeed, make use of - those changes.

Courses In

THE CONCENTRATION IN WOMEN'S STUDIES

Students must complete HIST275, Introduction to Women's Studies, preferably before they take other concentration courses. The remaining twenty-one (21) semester hours must be from the following courses, including at least one course from at least four subject areas.

 

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

DANC

310

Comparative Study of Dance: Works of Katherine Dunham and Pearl Primus

3 credits

ENGL

224

Contemporary Women's Literature: A World View

3 credits

ENGL

232

Women Writers in Science Fiction

3 credits

ENGL

233

Images of Women in Literature

3 credits

ENGL

236

A Survey of Early African-American Women's Poetry

3 credits

ENGL

237

Standing and Testifying: African-American Women Poets of the Harlem Renaissance

3 credits

ENGL

241

Women Writers

3 credits

ENGL

242

Postcolonial Women Writers

3 credits

ENGL

243

Literature by Women of Africa and the African Diaspora

3 credits

ENGL

318

African-American Film and Culture

3 credits

ENGL

343

African-American Women Writers

3 credits

ENGL

416

Major African Women Writers

3 credits

HEFS

181

Social-Psychological Aspects of Dress

3 credits

HIST

306

History of Women Since 1800

3 credits

HIST

423

The History of Women in Africa

3 credits

HIST

501

20th and 21st Century Women Activists of the World

3 credits

HIST

622

History of Asian Women

3 credits

JOMC

608

Women in the Media

3 credits

LIBS

230

The HIV/AIDS Crisis in Africa

3 credits

LIBS

302

Media Analysis

3 credits

LIBS

306

Gender and Technology

3 credits

LIBS

312

Gender and Development in Africa

3 credits

NURS

315

Women's Health Across the Lifespan

3 credits

PHIL

310

Feminist Philosophy

3 credits

POLI

450

Women in Politics

3 credits

PSYC

551

Psychology of Women

3 credits

SOWK

320

The Feminization of Poverty

3 credits

In addition to these 24 credit hours, students must take two Related Electives courses (for a total of 6 credit hours of courses not listed above) and the 3 credit Senior Research Project. [Link to SRRP page of website.]

Please note: A final grade of "C" or better is required for all Concentration Studies, Related Electives, ENGL100/101, and HIST206/207 (formerly HIST100/101) classes.

Please note: In addition to 30 credit hours of Concentration courses, all Liberal Studies Majors must take the following three 3 credit courses:

DepartmentCourse NumberCourse TitleSemester Hours

LIBS

200

Introduction to Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

300

Research Methods in Liberal Studies

3

LIBS

499

Senior Research Project

3

What should I do now?

Anyone wishing to become a Liberal Studies major with a concentration in Race, Class and Culture should contact the Chair of the Liberal Studies Department at 336-256-2165 (voice) or 336-256-2411 (fax) or visit the office in Room A456 General Classroom Building. After a review of the curriculum and admission to Liberal Studies, students are advised by a Race, Class, and Culture Concentration Coordinator for course selection, career advising, graduate school advising, etc.

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