Frequently Asked Questions

What is an Academic Reorganization?

An academic reorganization involves the realignment of colleges, programs, departments and
schools. The goal is to establish the most strategic academic structure and program inventory necessary to advance teaching, learning, research and engagement.

What changes have been made through the academic reorganization?

  • A uniform naming convention has been established for academic units reporting directly to the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs (i.e. colleges instead of colleges and schools)
  • Three new colleges have been established including, the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, the College of Health Sciences and the College of Science and Technology
  • Reorganized the School of Education (to become a college that also includes Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) and licensure coordinators)
  • Aligned licensure concentrations under their disciplinary bachelor degrees (e.g. the physics licensure would be a concentration under the physics degree program)
  • Explored areas of opportunity in doctoral programming (e.g. agriculture and environmental sciences, social work, bioengineering)
  • Conducted ongoing academic program analyses based on productivity, relevance, and student demographics

Why is an academic reorganization important?

To establish the best academic structure to reach the goals of a preeminent land-grant
institution and to position the students and university for long-term success in a more competitive, global marketplace. The rationale for the academic reorganization is to enhance increased:

  • Undergraduate and graduate enrollment
  • Faculty research and scholarly productivity
  • External funding
  • The number of students receiving national fellowships
  • Program and university national and international rankings

When did the academic reorganization process begin?

The academic reorganization process began in 2014.

How was the proper academic structure determined?

To begin the process, a four-member External Review Committee (ERC), comprised of current and former university faculty and administrators, was charged with providing recommendations that would:

  • Greatly enhance student success (retention and progression toward graduation)
  • Provide more opportunity for innovative teaching, research and engagement
  • Strengthen and enhance the visibility of academic programs
  • Enhance synergy and collaboration in curriculum and research
  • Provide effective and efficient use of resources

The ERC submitted a report that resulted from the committee's analysis of university data as well as input from faculty, staff, students and other stakeholders. The report was submitted to the Internal Academic Restructuring Steering Committee (IARSC) - comprised of representatives from each college and school, undergraduate and graduate students, the faculty and staff senates and the library - that was charged with:

  • Responding to the ERC report
  • Identifying new programs consistent with market and enrollment trends
  • Identifying existing programs inconsistent with market and enrollment trends
  • Developing framework for the ongoing review of academic programs

IARSC recommendations were presented to stakeholders via town hall meetings, chancellor's forums and university communications. The following eight recommendations were reviewed and approved by the N.C. A&T Board of Trustees on Feb. 19, 2016, and the University of North Carolina Board of Governors on April 15:

  • Utilize a uniform naming convention for academic units reporting directly to the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs (i.e., colleges instead of colleges and schools)
  • Create the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Create the College of Health and Human Sciences
  • Create the College of Science and Technology
  • Reorganize the School of Education (to become a college that also includes Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) and licensure coordinators)
  • Align licensure concentrations under their disciplinary bachelor's degrees (e.g., the physics licensure would be a concentration under the physics degree program)
  • Explore areas of opportunity in doctoral programming (e.g., agriculture and environmental sciences, social work, bioengineering)
  • Conduct ongoing academic program analyses based on productivity, relevance and student demographics

How will the university measure the success of the Reorganization?

The university will conduct ongoing academic program analyses based on productivity, relevance and student demographics to determine viability. The expectation is that the reorganization will: 

  • Capitalize on the synergy among similar disciplines
  • Increase competitiveness of academic programs
  • Cultivate collaboration and interdisciplinary research
  • Generate greater visibility for programs in agriculture, liberal arts and more
  • Simultaneously build upon our strong foundation of STEM- related programming
  • Enhance synergy and collaboration in curriculum and research
  • Provide effective and efficient use of resources
  • Foster operational efficiencies and institutional performance
  • Create opportunities for new and innovative programming

What opportunities were given to faculty, staff and students to voice their concerns and ask questions?

Representatives from each college and school, undergraduate and graduate students, the faculty and staff senates and the library were included on the Internal Academic Restructuring Steering Committee. The university has held several town hall meetings, Chancellor's Forums, and Deans' Council Meetings soliciting ideas and opinions. Various forms of university communication have also been disseminated for information purposes. Information was also posted internally via the university intranet.

What process is being used to implement the new academic structure?

In April 2016, an Executive Transition Team (ETT)—comprised of representatives from Business and Finance, Information Technology Services, Advancement, Academic Affairs, Human Resources, Facilities, Faculty Senate, Staff Senate, Student Affairs, Division of Research and Economic Development, University Relations and Enrollment Management—was formed to implement the reorganization.

When will all the changes go into effect?

August 2016.

Will there be ongoing changes?

Yes, the university will conduct ongoing academic program analyses based on productivity, relevance, and student demographics to determine viability.

What will happen to online programs?

Online programs will remain with their home departments. They may have been realigned with another college.

What additional financial expenses will the university incur with the new Academic Reorganization?

The reorganization is revenue neutral and the new academic structure will not incur more expenses than the former academic structure.

How will employees in the reorganized areas be affected?

Most employees will not be affected by the reorganization. There will be a limited number of employees reassigned as needed.

What will happen to my major?

Majors and concentrations are realigned according to the following new departmental groupings:

College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences

Agri-Business, Applied Economics and Agri-Science Education; Animal Sciences; Family and Consumer Sciences; Natural Resources and Environmental Design

College of Business and Economics

Accounting and Finance; Business Education; Economics; Management; Marketing, Transportation and Supply Chain

College of Education

Administration and Instructional Services; Leadership Studies and Adult Education; Counseling; Educator Preparation

College of Engineering

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering; Chemical, Biological and Bioengineering; Computational Science and Engineering; Computer Science; Electrical and Computer Engineering; Industrial and Systems Engineering; Mechanical Engineering

College of Health and Human Sciences

Human Performance and Leisure Studies; Psychology; School of Nursing; Social Work & Sociology

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

English; History; Journalism and Mass Communication; Liberal Studies; Political Science and Criminal Justice; Visual and Performing Arts

College of Science and Technology

Applied Engineering Technology; Biology; Built Environment; Chemistry; Computer Systems Technology; Energy and Environmental Systems; Graphic Design Technology; Mathematics; Physics

Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoegineering

Nanoengineering (NC A& T); Nanoscience (UNCG)

The Graduate College

Name change only

How does the reorganization affect alumni?

Due to the realignment of some departments, majors and concentrations to colleges, some alumni will have new college affiliations. A detailed description of new departmental groupings is as follows:

College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences

Agri-Business, Applied Economics and Agri-Science Education; Animal Sciences; Family and Consumer Sciences; Natural Resources and Environmental Design

College of Business and Economics

Accounting and Finance; Business Education; Economics; Management; Marketing, Transportation and Supply Chain

College of Education

Administration and Instructional Services; Leadership Studies and Adult Education; Counseling; Educator Preparation

College of Engineering

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering; Chemical, Biological and Bioengineering; Computational Science and Engineering; Computer Science; Electrical and Computer Engineering; Industrial and Systems Engineering; Mechanical Engineering

College of Health and Human Sciences

Human Performance and Leisure Studies; Psychology; School of Nursing; Social Work & Sociology

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

English; History; Journalism and Mass Communication; Liberal Studies; Political Science and Criminal Justice; Visual and Performing Arts

College of Science and Technology

Applied Engineering Technology; Biology; Built Environment; Chemistry; Computer Systems Technology; Energy and Environmental Systems; Graphic Design Technology; Mathematics; Physics

Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoegineering

Nanoengineering (NC A& T); Nanoscience (UNCG)

The Graduate College

Name change only

Will my degree still be valid?

Yes.

Will degrees have to be reissued?

No, all degrees are valid so there is no need to reissue.

How can I ensure that my donation will continue to support the program(s) that I have been supporting for years?

University Advancement will work with donors to assure donations will support their program(s) of choice.

As an alum, who do I celebrate homecoming with if my department has been realigned?

It is at your discretion. Alumni have the option of celebrating with their past affiliate school or college or with their new college to develop new relationships.

What happens with my position on an advisory board for a school/college/program that has been reorganized?

At the program level there will be very little impact. At the college level membership changes may be necessary. Please contact the dean of the new college to discuss any changes in board service.

How will each college or school be affected?

The School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, School of Business and Economics, and The Graduate School will only undergo name changes to reflect the uniform college naming convention. Significant changes are below. Please see the flow charts and table for additional movement and changes to specific departmental groupings on the university website.

College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences (CAES)

The College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences remains largely unaltered with minor exceptions. Licensure concentrations are aligned under their disciplinary bachelor degrees. Academic programs will be analyzed on an on-going basis based for productivity, relevance and student demographics to determine viability.

College of Business and Economics (COBE)

The College of Business and Economics remains largely unaltered with minor exceptions. Licensure concentrations are aligned under their disciplinary bachelor degrees. Academic programs will be analyzed on an on-going basis for productivity, relevance and student demographics to determine viability.

College of Engineering (COE) and the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering (JSNN)

The College of Engineering and the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering are unaltered in the new academic structure. JSNN retains its school designation due to branding considerations and joint nature with the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

College of Health and Human Sciences (CHHS)

The College of Health and Human Sciences capitalizes upon interactive relationships among the Departments of Human Performance and Leisure Studies, Psychology, Social Work and Sociology, and the School of Nursing. The Department of Human Performance and Leisure Studies will move from the current School of Education and the Departments of Psychology and Social Work and Sociology will move from the former College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Science and Technology (COST)

The College of Science and Technology assembles the Departments of Applied Engineering Technology, Built Environment, Computer Systems Technology and Graphic Design Systems from the former School of Technology with the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Energy and Environmental Systems, Physics, and Mathematics from the former College of Arts and Sciences. The COST will enhance science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduate production in areas of national and state need, and will create a synergistic environment that enhances the transition of research from the laboratory to marketplace. In addition, the COST aligns with N.C. A&T’s STEM focused mission.

As part of the reorganization, the licensure concentrations for teaching in biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics currently reside with their respective departments as opposed to their previous location within the College of Education.

College of Education (CEd)

The departmental structure within the College of Education facilitates increased production and higher-quality pre-K through secondary education teachers. The CEd is composed of the Departments of Administration and Instructional Services, Adult Education and Leadership Studies, Counseling, and Educator Preparation. Coupled with the reorganization within the CEd is a multi-college governance structure required to produce high-quality secondary education teachers, including high-demand STEM secondary teachers, in collaboration with the Colleges of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences; Business; Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences; and Science and Technology. The multi-college governance structure supports enhancement to the Master of Art in Teaching (MAT) entry route for K-12 teachers.

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS)

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences raises the visibility of programs and enhances the quantity of students matriculating through programs and moving into the workforce and graduate studies. The new college houses the departments of English, history, journalism and mass communication, liberal studies, political science and criminal justice and visual and performing arts. Licensure concentrations for teaching in biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics currently reside with their respective departments.

The Graduate College (TGC)

The Graduate College remains largely unaltered with minor exceptions. Academic programs will be analyzed on an on-going basis for productivity, relevance and student demographics to determine vi ability. 

What happens next?

The academic reorganization has taken effect. Academic program analyses will be conducted on an ongoing basis for productivity, relevance and student demographics to determine viability. We anticipate seizing opportunities for further realignment and the creation of new programs.